Welcome

Dear Students in Harvard College:

For almost four centuries, Harvard College has been educating responsible citizens and citizen-leaders for our society. When you join the Harvard community, you are embarking on a liberal arts and sciences education that is meant to be transformative – academically, socially, and personally. The Handbook for Students is designed to orient you to Harvard College as you begin this journey. It contains information on the academic, social, and personal development opportunities available to you and the many resources to help you find advice and make good choices.

The Handbook can be your guide to academic requirements, our residential system, and the many activities that take place outside the classroom. You will also find in these pages the broad outlines of the concentrations and secondary fields offered by the College. Importantly, the Handbook clarifies the values and standards we hold as a community and that we expect you to honor in your conduct as a student in the College. If you ever have questions about any of these standards, please do not hesitate to reach out to your professors, TFs, tutors, proctors, or Allston Burr Resident Dean or Resident Dean of First-Year Students. As members of an academic community committed to the search for truth and knowledge, we all share the responsibility for upholding these standards. To that end, the College has adopted an honor code. The Honor Code is the result of several years of open discussion and collaboration between students, faculty and staff. A copy of the code can be found on the Honor Code website.

As you read this Handbook, I hope you will consider the numerous possibilities it suggests. The next four years provide the best possible opportunity for you to stretch, take a chance, in your curricular and extra-curricular life. There is no one best way to “do Harvard,” and students who are open to new experiences get the most from their time here. Your years at Harvard will be well spent if you venture beyond your “comfort zones” both inside and outside the classroom. Take time to reflect on who you are and who you are trying to become. Take classes in subjects that introduce you to fields and ideas outside of your concentration and help you develop new ways of thinking and understanding. Participate in activities you have never tried. And most important of all, reach out to and connect with people who are different from you. The Harvard community is staggeringly diverse in interests, talents, backgrounds, demography, and values. Our ability to meaningfully engage in a diverse community can set the patterns for the changes we want to see in our larger society.

Life at the College, as anywhere, can be confusing and feel overwhelming. Remember that there are many people available here to help you work through these moments and think through your choices, both academic and otherwise. Seek out advisers you like and trust, and never be afraid to ask for some of their time. We hope that you will read this Handbook carefully and use it to find the support you need. You don’t have to earn the right to ask for help. Everyone at the College wants you to flourish.

I look forward to meeting many of you at functions both formal and informal. Please feel free to come to my office hours to discuss any issues of concern to you, or just to get acquainted. If you see me on campus, please introduce yourself. You can also email me at rkhurana@fas.harvard.edu.

If there is anything we in the College offices can do to help you better navigate your college life, I hope you will let me know. We want you to feel a part of the rich and varied community that is Harvard. I wish you a happy, healthy, and fruitful year.

Rakesh Khurana
Danoff Dean of Harvard College
Marvin Bower Professor of Leadership Development, Harvard Business School
Professor of Sociology, Harvard University
University Hall, 119
617-495-1560 or rkhurana@fas.harvard.edu

Introduction

Notice to Students

 

This website contains a review of the rules and procedures of Harvard College with which students are expected to be familiar. Included are the College-wide requirements for the AB and SB degrees. Specific requirements for each of the fields of concentration and secondary fields can be found under the Fields of Concentration and Secondary Fields headings. Also included here is information on a number of the services, programs, and organizations that have been created to bring assistance and enrichment to a student’s undergraduate experience. Throughout this website, “the Registrar” refers to the Office of the Registrar of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.

Harvard University makes all decisions concerning applicants, students, faculty, and staff on the basis of the individual’s qualifications to contribute to Harvard’s educational objectives and institutional needs. Discrimination on the basis of race, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, age, national or ethnic origin, political beliefs, veteran status, or disability unrelated to job or course requirements is inconsistent with the purposes of a university and with the law. Harvard expects that those with whom it deals will comply with all applicable anti-discrimination laws.

In May of 2018, the completion or graduation rate for students who entered Harvard College as first-year students in September 2012 was 98 percent.

Review of academic, financial, and other considerations leads to changes in the policies, rules, and regulations applicable to students. The Faculty of Arts and Sciences therefore reserves the right to make changes at any time. These changes may affect such matters as tuition and all other fees, courses, degrees and programs offered (including the modification or possible elimination of degrees and programs), degree and other academic requirements, academic policies, rules pertaining to student conduct and discipline, fields or areas of concentration, and other rules and regulations applicable to students.

While every effort has been made to ensure that this book is accurate and up to date, it may include typographical or other errors. Changes are periodically made to this publication and will be incorporated in new editions.

Lauren Mulcahy, Case Manager, Office of Academic Integrity and Student Conduct
Brigitte Libby, Assistant Dean, Office of Academic Integrity and Student Conduct
Michael Burke, Registrar of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences
Sarah Champlin-Scharff, Director of Academic Policy, Office of Undergraduate Education
Brett Flehinger, Associate Dean of Academic Integrity and Student Conduct
Charlie Stuart, Case Manager, Office of Academic Integrity and Student Conduct
Khaleem Ali, Case Manager, Office of Academic Integrity and Student Conduct

The Official Register of Harvard University
Published by the Office of the Dean of Harvard College 617-495-1560 or hcdean@fas.harvard.edu

The Mission of Harvard College

Harvard College adheres to the purposes for which the Charter of 1650 was granted: “The advancement of all good literature, arts, and sciences; the advancement and education of youth in all manner of good literature, arts, and sciences; and all other necessary provisions that may conduce to the education of the … youth of this country.” In brief: Harvard strives to create knowledge, to open the minds of students to that knowledge, and to enable students to take best advantage of their educational opportunities.

To these ends, the College encourages students to respect ideas and their free expression, and to rejoice in discovery and in critical thought; to pursue excellence in a spirit of productive cooperation; and to assume responsibility for the consequences of personal actions. Harvard seeks to identify and to remove restraints on students’ full participation, so that individuals may explore their capabilities and interests and may develop their full intellectual and human potential. Education at Harvard should liberate students to explore, to create, to challenge, and to lead. The support the College provides to students is a foundation upon which self-reliance and habits of lifelong learning are built: Harvard expects that the scholarship and collegiality it fosters in its students will lead them in their later lives to advance knowledge, to promote understanding, and to serve society.

A Brief History of Harvard College

Harvard was founded in 1636 by vote of the Great and General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and named for its first donor, the Reverend John Harvard, who left his personal library and half his estate to the new institution. Although nothing remains of its earliest buildings, brass markers in the middle of Massachusetts Avenue now indicate where the Goffe and Peyntree Houses once stood. The charter granted to Harvard by the Colony in 1650, with amendments and John Adams’s further definition in the fifth chapter of the Massachusetts Constitution of 1780, is the authority under which the University of today operates.

Like any institution, Harvard has a rich and complex history. Many of our graduates and faculty members, as scholars and citizens, have shaped the political, social, and economic landscape of our nation in countless ways that have contributed to the well-being of society and humanity. As a human institution, we have also sometimes fallen short of our aspirations.  There are parts of our history that we can and should learn from. Our falling short in no way detracts from the power of our ideals. Rather, our failures remind us that we should never take for granted what we do and how we do it; we must recognize that as a community devoted to learning, our work is never complete.

The Early Centuries

For its first two hundred years Harvard College followed a set curriculum consistent with the instructional style of the period. It emphasized rhetorical principles, rote learning, and constant drilling. The faculty was very small, yet already distinguished. John Winthrop (AB 1732), who held the Hollis Professorship and taught mathematics and natural philosophy from 1738 to 1779, was one of America’s greatest men of science in the colonial era.

Harvard’s oldest buildings date from the eighteenth century. Massachusetts Hall (1720), Wadsworth House (1726), and Holden Chapel (1744) are the earliest. Hollis Hall has been a dormitory since it was built in 1763. Harvard Hall (1766) stands on the site of a seventeenth-century building of the same name. It burned down one wintry night in 1764, destroying the 5,000-volume college library (then the largest in North America), and the scientific laboratory and apparatus. Old Stoughton College suffered so much damage from occupation by Continental troops during the Revolution that it had to be torn down in 1781. A new Stoughton Hall (1805), Holworthy Hall (1812), and University Hall (1815) form the outline of the original Yard.

Established to provide a learned ministry to the colonies, Harvard only later created graduate programs beginning with medical studies in 1782; law and divinity did not become graduate departments until 1816 and 1817, respectively. Even so, the College did not take on the aspect of a true university until mid-century, when a library building (1841), an observatory (1846), a scientific school (1847), a chemistry laboratory (1857), and a natural history museum (1860) were built.

The Coming of the Modern University

Under the presidency of Charles William Eliot (1869–1909) the number and variety of courses multiplied, the lecture system supplanted the older method of recitation, and students were permitted a free choice of courses. However, long before he succeeded Eliot as president of the University, A. Lawrence Lowell came to believe that there was “too much teaching and too little studying” in Harvard College. Accordingly, throughout his presidency (1909–1933), Lowell emphasized scholarship and honors work, eventually introducing the system of “concentration and distribution,” together with general examinations and tutorials, which continues essentially unchanged today.

Early in the twentieth century the professional schools each acquired a new building: Medicine in 1906, Law in 1907, and Business Administration in 1926. The great central library building, named for Harry Elkins Widener, dates from 1915, the present Fogg Museum from 1927, the Mallinckrodt chemical laboratory from 1929. A similar burst of physical expansion marked the concluding years of James Bryant Conant’s presidency (1933–1953) and the entire term of Nathan Marsh Pusey (1953–1971).

Pusey and Bok: The Growth of the University

During the Pusey period, government subsidy for science made possible the building and renovating of major facilities in the areas of medicine, public health, and the basic and applied sciences. Fund-raising campaigns improved the faculty salary structure and related benefits, increased student financial aid, and created many new professorships.

Pusey’s successor was Derek Curtis Bok, whose twenty-one-year presidency (1971–1991) was a period of unprecedented growth for the University. At the beginning of Bok’s presidency, a reduction in government assistance and the effect of inflation on operating costs began to take their toll. It was necessary to seek private sources of support in order to achieve the President’s goals. Under Bok’s aegis, a capital campaign was completed.

It included a $350 million effort to improve the College and strengthen the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and programs in public service. Crucial to these efforts was the development of policies that encouraged the recruitment and appointment of outstanding women and minority scholars to permanent faculty positions. While reaffirming the principle that every Harvard undergraduate should be broadly educated, the new Core Curriculum emphasized the study of approaches to knowledge in seven areas considered indispensable to the contemporary student: Foreign Cultures, Historical Study, Literature and Arts, Moral Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning, Science, and Social Analysis.

Harvard into the Twenty-First Century: Rudenstine, Summers, Faust, and Bacow

Neil L. Rudenstine, Harvard’s 26th president, took office in 1991. He concluded his tenure as president in June 2001, after a decade of service. The Rudenstine years were marked by efforts to strengthen collaboration among the different parts of Harvard, to advance an array of programmatic initiatives across the arts and sciences and the professional schools, to expand Harvard’s international agenda, to adapt the University to the new information age, and to keep Harvard’s doors open to outstanding students from across the economic spectrum. Rudenstine is credited, among other things, with guiding the creation of the new Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, born of the merger of Radcliffe College with Harvard; with initiating steps toward an eventual new Harvard campus in the Allston section of Boston; with vigorous advocacy of the educational importance of student diversity; and with leading an unprecedented University-wide campaign that raised a record $2.6 billion for student financial aid.

In July 2001, Lawrence H. Summers, (PhD 1982), became Harvard’s 27th president. The former Nathaniel Ropes Professor of Political Economy at Harvard, he also served in a number of prominent public policy roles, including Vice President of Development Economics and Chief Economist of the World Bank, and Secretary of the U.S. Treasury. As Harvard’s president, Summers spurred attention to renewing the undergraduate experience, guided the launch of innovative interdisciplinary initiatives in the sciences and beyond, and strongly expanded Harvard’s international agenda. Under his leadership, the University reached out to many more undergraduates from low-income families and also strengthened financial aid for graduate and professional students pursuing careers in public service. Harvard also achieved dramatic faculty growth, undertook major investments in an array of new facilities, and took the first steps toward building Harvard’s extended campus in Allston during Summers’ presidency. Summers stepped down in June 2006, and became a University Professor. In July 2006, Derek Bok returned to the office as interim president while a search for a new Harvard president was launched. As interim president, Bok devoted himself to bringing to a successful conclusion an ongoing review of undergraduate education, planning for the development of University land in Allston, and identifying organizational changes necessary to promote interdisciplinary research, such as reform of the academic calendar.

Drew Gilpin Faust took office as Harvard’s 28th president on July 1, 2007. Faust, a historian of the Civil War and the American South, is also the Lincoln Professor of History in Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Previously she had served as founding dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, a post she took up on January 1, 2001. As the first dean of the Radcliffe Institute, Faust guided the transformation of Radcliffe from a college into a wide-ranging institute for advanced study. Under her leadership, Radcliffe emerged as one of the nation’s foremost centers of scholarly and creative enterprise, distinctive for its multidisciplinary focus and the exploration of new knowledge at the crossroads of traditional fields. Before coming to Radcliffe, Faust was Annenberg Professor of History and director of the Women’s Studies Program at the University of Pennsylvania, where she served for 25 years on the faculty.

Lawrence S. Bacow took office on July 1, 2018 and is the 29th President of Harvard University.

One of higher education’s most widely experienced leaders, President Bacow is committed to supporting scholarship and research, encouraging civic engagement, and expanding opportunity for all. From 2001 to 2011, he was president of Tufts University, where he fostered collaboration and advanced the university’s commitment to excellence in teaching, research, and public service. Prior to Tufts, he spent 24 years on the faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he held the Lee and Geraldine Martin Professorship of Environmental Studies and served as Chair of the Faculty (1995-97) and as Chancellor (1998-2001).

An expert on non-adjudicatory approaches to the resolution of environmental disputes, President Bacow received an S.B. in economics from MIT, a J.D. from Harvard Law School, and an M.P.P. and Ph.D. in public policy from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. Prior to his election to the Harvard presidency in February 2018, he served as a member of the Harvard Corporation (2011-18), the Hauser Leader-in-Residence at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government (2014-18), and a President-in-Residence at the Harvard Graduate School of Education (2011-14).

President Bacow was raised in Pontiac, Michigan, by parents who were both immigrants. He and his wife, Adele Fleet Bacow, were married in 1975 and have two adult sons.

Radcliffe and Harvard

Radcliffe College had been founded in 1879 “to furnish instruction and the opportunities of collegiate life to women and to promote their higher education.” From its inception, one aspect of Radcliffe’s commitment to that goal was to provide women access to the Harvard faculty. From 1879 to 1943, Harvard professors repeated to Radcliffe students the lectures they gave at Harvard. In 1943, the instruction of Radcliffe undergraduates became a formal responsibility of the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Three years later all courses were made coeducational, except for some of the large freshman courses, which remained segregated for several more years. Then, in the 1960s the pace of integration quickened. Harvard degrees were awarded to Radcliffe students for the first time in 1963, and in the same year women were admitted to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. In 1967 the doors of Lamont Library were opened to women. However, it remained for Derek Bok to make the most dramatic initial steps in the process of integration. In 1975 the two Colleges combined their separate admissions offices and an equal-access admissions policy was adopted. In 1977, Harvard and Radcliffe agreed that Radcliffe would delegate to Harvard all responsibility for undergraduate education of women and the management of undergraduate affairs. After the 1977 Agreement, Radcliffe College devoted increasing attention to cultivation and development of research and postgraduate programs, having turned over almost all responsibility for collegiate affairs to Harvard College. A unified House system brought coeducational living into being, using both Radcliffe’s Houses in the Radcliffe Quadrangle and the River Houses of Harvard.

On September 14, 1999, the governing bodies of Harvard and Radcliffe completed the merger of the two institutions. Harvard College assumed full responsibility for the education of undergraduate women. At that point Harvard College created the Ann Radcliffe Trust, “a set of programs for Harvard undergraduates that seeks to raise the awareness of women and women’s issues at Harvard.” In fall 2006 the Harvard College Women’s Center opened in Harvard Yard, providing a space both for meetings and for relaxation. The Center absorbs the Ann Radcliffe Trust and continues the work of developing and implementing a comprehensive outreach and support structure for undergraduate women individually, and for their student organizations.

As a result of the merger, the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study was established. “Building on Radcliffe’s current programs,” to quote its mission statement, “and its continuing commitment to the study of women, gender and society, the Radcliffe Institute is an interdisciplinary center where leading scholars can promote learning and scholarship across a broad array of academic and professional fields within the setting of a major university. The institute offers non-degree instruction and executive education programs.” It was the intention to create a center for advanced study of the first rank.

Harvard Today

Today Harvard comprises a Faculty of Arts and Sciences, including Harvard College, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Division of Continuing Education, and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. There are eight other faculties: Business Administration, Design, Divinity, Education, Government, Law, Medicine (including Dental Medicine), and Public Health; and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Its total campus area occupies about 500 acres, concentrated in Cambridge and Boston. Its faculty and staff number about 20,000 individuals, many of them part-time. The University has a regular enrollment of 17,000 plus some 30,000 other students who take credit courses, non-credit courses, and seminars in University Extension, the Summer School, and other programs in continuing education.

Academic Calendar

Academic Year 2019-2020

Fall Term

August 1, Thursday

  • Final degree applications for November 2019 degree candidates due.

August 19, Monday

August 27, Tuesday

  • Dormitories open for first-year students to move in from 9 am to 3 pm.

August 31, Saturday

  • Houses open for upperclassmen at 9 am.

September 2, Monday

  • University holiday: Labor Day.

September 3, Tuesday

  • Academic year begins.
  • Last day for all undergraduates to check-in online.

COURSE REGISTRATION DEADLINE

September 9, Monday

  • Course Registration for all students (upperclassmen, first-year students, visiting undergraduates, and new transfer students) are due by 11:59 pm.
  • Fall Session 1 course registration deadline.
  • Students must submit enrollments for their minimum course load – typically 16 credits - on my.harvard by 11:59 pm. Students who do not submit enrollments by this time will be charged a fee. 
  • After this date students must obtain permission from all instructors to enroll in courses.

September 9, Monday

  • Last day upon which undergraduates may check-in/register late for the fall term in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
  • Last day upon which undergraduates may cancel their check-in/registration for the fall term without payment of tuition.
  • Plans of Study/Declaration of Concentration due for transfer students who entered in fall 2018 with second-semester Sophomore or Junior class standing.

September 16, Monday

  • Makeup Examinations for 2018-2019 begin.
  • Last day upon which undergraduates may drop or add any Fall Session 1 course without a fee.

September 23, Monday

  • Last day upon which undergraduates may drop or add any course without a fee.
  • Last day upon which undergraduates may withdraw from any Fall Session 1 course, a notation of WD will be permanently recorded on the transcript.

October 1, Tuesday

  • Applications for degree credit for study out of residence for the spring term are due at the Office of International Education.

FIFTH MONDAY

October 7, Monday 

  • No full-semester or year-long course may be dropped from or added to a student’s record after this date.
  • No course may be changed from letter-graded to Pass/Fail or from Pass/Fail to letter-graded status for the fall term after this date.

October 7, Monday

  • Students leaving the College by this date are charged one quarter of tuition and the Student Services Fee. After this date, students will be charged one half of those costs. See the chart under Financial Information for details of room and board charges.

October 14, Monday

  • University holiday: Columbus Day (Federal), Indigenous Peoples' Day (City of Cambridge).

October 18, Friday

  • Fall Session 1 ends.

October 18, Friday

  • Deadline for applying for spring housing if you were not living in student housing during the fall term. The Returning Student Housing Application can be found here

SEVENTH MONDAY

October 21, Monday

  • Last day upon which students may withdraw from a fall term course, a notation of WD will be permanently recorded on the transcript. After this date students are responsible for all courses in which they are enrolled.

October 21, Monday

  • Fall Session 2 begins.

October 25, Friday

  • Fall Session 2 course registration deadline.

October 28, Monday

  • Students leaving the College by this date are charged one half of tuition and the Student Services Fee. After this date, students will be charged three quarters of those costs. See the chart under Financial Information for details of room and board charges.

November 1, Friday through November 2, Saturday

  • First-Year Family Weekend.

November 4, Monday

  • Last day upon which undergraduates may drop or add any Fall Session 2 course.

November 11, Monday

  • Deadline to submit a spring term Inter-House Transfer Application.

November 11, Monday

  • University holiday: Veterans’ Day (observed for staff). Classes will be held on a regular Monday Schedule.
  • Deadline for students in the fall term to notify the College they are not returning to the College housing for the spring term without financial penalty.

November 12, Tuesday

  • Last day upon which undergraduates may withdraw from any Fall Session 2 course, a notation of WD will be permanently recorded on the transcript.

November 14, Thursday

  • Declaration of Concentration due for class of 2022.

November 27, Wednesday, through December 1, Sunday

  • Thanksgiving recess.

December 2, Monday

  • Final degree applications for March 2020 Degree Candidates due.
  • Last day to change concentration for March 2020 Degree Candidates without Administrative Board approval.
  • Last day upon which March 2020 Degree Candidates may submit an approved foreign language citation study plan to the Office of the Registrar.
  • Last day upon which March 2020 Degree Candidates may submit an approved petition for a secondary field to the Office of the Registrar.
  • Advanced Standing-eligible students planning to graduate after six or seven terms in March 2020, or to begin a fourth year AM program in spring term 2020, must file an Advanced Standing Activation Form by this date.

December 3, Tuesday

  • Last day of fall term classes.
  • Fall Session 2 ends.

December 4, Wednesday

  • Students leaving the College by this date are charged three-quarters of tuition and the Student Services Fee. After this date, students will be charged the full amount of those costs. See the chart under Financial Information for details of room and board charges.
  • Last day in the fall term upon which undergraduates will ordinarily be granted a leave of absence from the College.
  • Students leaving the College after this date are charged full housing / room fees.

READING PERIOD

December 4, Wednesday, through December 9, Monday

EXAMINATION PERIOD
See the Registrar’s website for exam times and locations for fall term courses.

December 10, Tuesday, through December 19, Thursday

December 20, Friday

  • All first-year students must vacate the dorms by 3 pm.
  • Upperclassmen must vacate the Houses by 5 pm.
  • Students not continuing in residence for spring term 2020 must leave their rooms by noon.
  • Students transferring from one House to another must move on this day after noon. Check with your new House Administrator for a specific time.

December 20, 2019, Friday, through January 26, 2020, Sunday

  • Winter recess.

January 17, Friday, through January 26, Sunday

  • Wintersession.

January 17, Friday

  • All Houses and Dorms open at 9 am for the spring term.

January 20, Monday

  • University holiday: Martin Luther King Day.


Spring Term

CHECK-IN
For specific times and locations, refer to the Registrar’s website.

January 13, Monday

January 27, Monday

  • Last day for all undergraduates to check-in online.

January 27, Monday

  • Spring term begins. First meeting of spring term classes.
  • Spring Session 1 begins.

COURSE REGISTRATION DEADLINE

January 31, Friday

  • Course registrations for all students (upperclassmen, first-year students, visiting undergraduates, and new transfer students) are due by 11:59 pm.
  • Spring Session 1 course registration deadline.
  • Students must submit enrollments for their minimum course load – typically 16 credits - on my.harvard by 11:59 pm. Students who do not submit enrollments by this time will be charged a fee. 
  • After this date students must obtain permission from all instructors to enroll in courses.

January 31, Friday

  • Last day upon which undergraduates may check-in/register late for the spring term in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
  • Last day upon which undergraduates may cancel their check-in/registration for the spring term without payment of tuition.

February 10, Monday

  • Last day upon which undergraduates may drop or add any course without a fee.
  • Last day upon which undergraduates may drop or add any Spring Session 1 course without a fee.
  • Makeup examinations for 2019-2020 fall term begin.
  • Deadline to submit a fall term Inter-House Transfer Application (Round 1).
  • Deadline to submit a Returning Student Housing Application for fall housing if you were not living in student housing during the fall term. The Returning Student Housing Application can be found here

February 17, Monday

  • University holiday: Presidents’ Day.

February 18, Tuesday

  • Last day upon which undergraduates may withdraw from any Spring Session 1 course, a notation of WD will be permanently recorded on the transcript.

February 21, Friday, through February 22, Saturday

  • Junior Family Weekend.

FIFTH MONDAY

February 24, Monday

  • Last day upon which a full-semester course may be dropped from or added to a student’s record. No course may be changed from letter-graded to Pass/Fail or from Pass/Fail to letter-graded status for the spring term after this date.
  • Last day upon which students may petition to divide a year-long indivisible course with approval.

February 24, Monday

  • Students leaving the College by this date are charged one quarter of tuition and the Student Services Fee. After this date, students will be charged one half of those costs. See the chart under Financial Information for details of room and board charges.

March 1, Sunday

  • Applications for degree credit for study out of residence for the fall term are due at the Office of International Education. 

SEVENTH MONDAY

March 9, Monday

  • Last day upon which students may withdraw from a spring term course. Last day upon which students may withdraw from a year-long course. A notation of WD will be permanently recorded on the transcript. After this date students are responsible for all courses in which they are enrolled.

March 13, Friday

  • Spring Session 1 ends.

March 14, Saturday, through March 22, Sunday

  • Spring recess.

March 23, Monday

  • Spring Session 2 begins.

March 27, Friday

  • Spring Session 2 course registration deadline.

April 1, Wednesday

  • Final degree applications for May 2020 Degree Candidates due.
  • Last day to change concentration without Administrative Board approval for May 2020 and November 2020 Degree Candidates.
  • Last day upon which May 2020 and November 2020 degree candidates may submit an approved foreign language citation study plan to the Office of the Registrar.
  • Advanced Standing-eligible students planning to graduate after six or seven terms in May 2021 or November 2021, or to begin a fourth year AM program in fall term 2020, must file the Advanced Standing Activation Form by this date.
  • Last day upon which May 2020 and November 2020 Degree Candidates may submit an approved petition for a secondary field to the Office of the Registrar.

April 1, Wednesday

  • Students leaving the College by this date are charged one half of tuition and the Student Services Fee. After this date, students will be charged three quarters of those costs. See the chart under Financial Information for details of room and board charges.

April 1, Wednesday

  • Applications for degree credit for study out of residence for the summer are due at the Office of International Education.

April 6, Monday

  • Last day upon which undergraduates may drop or add any Spring Session 2 course.

April 9, Thursday

  • Declaration of Concentration due for out-of-phase members of the Class of 2022.

April 13, Monday

  • Last day upon which undergraduates may withdraw from any Spring Session 2 course, a notation of WD will be permanently recorded on the transcript.

April 29, Wednesday

  • Last day of spring term classes.
  • Spring Session 2 ends.

April 30, Thursday

  • Students leaving the College by this date are charged three quarters of tuition, and the Student Services Fee. After this date, students will be charged the full amount of those costs. See the chart under Financial Information for details of room and board charges.
  • Last day in the spring term upon which undergraduates will ordinarily be granted a leave of absence from the College.
  • Students leaving the College after this date are charged full housing/room fees.

READING PERIOD

April 30, Thursday, through May 6, Wednesday

EXAMINATION PERIOD
See the Registrar’s website for exam times and locations for spring term courses.

May 7, Thursday, through May 16, Saturday

May 11, Monday

  • Deadline to submit a fall term Inter-House Transfer Application (Round 2).
  • Deadline to submit a Housing Contract Cancellation form for the fall term without financial penalty.

May 17, Sunday

  • Non-graduates must vacate their rooms by noon.

May 25, Monday

  • University holiday: Memorial Day.

May 28, Thursday

  • Harvard University Commencement.

May 29, Friday

  • Graduating seniors must vacate their rooms by 5 pm.

Late Fees

Fees for late housing cancellation, late check-in, late course registration, and change-of-course petitions are waived only when the University is responsible for the difficulty or when the situation involves a serious illness of the student (usually including hospitalization) or a death in the student’s immediate family.

Check-In

Any student in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences who fails to complete the check-in process on my.harvard by the deadline will be charged $50. Additionally, the Dean of Harvard College may place a student on involuntary leave of absence for failing to complete the check-in process and register for courses as required at the beginning of the term. (See also: The Check-In Process and Course Registration.)

Course Registration

A student who fails to register for courses on or before the deadline will incur a late fee of $40 per week. Failure to complete the course registration process may subject the student to disciplinary action and an involuntary leave of absence.

After the fifth Monday of the term, the Administrative Board's approval is also required. No courses added after the fifth Monday may be taken Pass/Fail.

Course Changes

Any student adding/dropping/withdrawing from a course will be charged according to the following schedule. Students are not charged for any drop/add submissions completed by the third Monday of the term. All students pay a $10 fee for drop/add submissions between the third Monday and the fifth Monday of the term. After the fifth Monday, drop/add petitions may no longer be filed. Withdrawal submissions filed between the fifth Monday and the seventh Monday also cost $10. A notation of WD will be permanently recorded on the student’s transcript. Withdrawal petitions may not be filed after the seventh Monday of the term. There is no charge for changing the grade status of a course.

Changes to a student's schedule after the deadlines require approval by the Administrative Board and will incur an additional fee of $25 plus the $10 change-of-course fee.

Plan of Study

An overdue Plan of Study will make the student liable for a late fee of $25 for the first week, $50 thereafter, and for disciplinary action, including requirement to withdraw. 

 

Future Academic Calendars

Academic calendars for upcoming years are available on the Registrar's website. Please note that they are subject to change.

 

Examination Scheduling

Exam dates are posted on the Registrar's website within three weeks of the start of the term. Exam dates and course deadlines ordinarily correspond to class meeting times and change if the meeting time changes. Occasionally, the Registrar will assign an Exam/Final Deadline Group that does not correspond to the meeting time of the course.

Many factors must be considered when scheduling eighteen Exam/Final Deadline Groups in a nine-day Examination Period, including student conflicts, room availability, and personnel resources. Unfortunately, the Registrar is unable to accommodate individual requests to assign alternative Exam/Final Deadline Groups to courses.

Since the days and hours for courses are subject to change, official dates and times for examinations are published on the Final Examination Schedule that is posted online approximately three weeks into the term. This posted schedule is subject to change.

In selecting courses, students should understand that two Exam/Final Deadline Groups will be scheduled on the same day.  Students who want to avoid having two exams on one day should consult the Final Exam Schedule when enrolling in courses.

Students who have two exams scheduled for the same time will be reassigned an exam time other than the one posted for one of the courses. Students will be informed of this alternate exam time at least one week prior to the first day of exams. If students have questions regarding an exam conflict they should contact the Registrar’s Office at exams@fas.harvard.edu.

 

Exam/Final Deadline Groups and Dates

The table below shows the dates of final examinations associated with each of the Exam/Final Deadline Groups. For most courses, an Exam/Final Deadline Group is posted on my.harvard within the course description. Exam/Final Deadline Groups correspond to course meeting days and times and ordinarily change if the course meeting days and times change. Occasionally, the Office of the Registrar may need to assign an Exam/Final Deadline Group that does not correspond to the meeting days and times of a course. All students are therefore advised that they should not make any travel plans until the official Final Examination Schedule is published. Students are expected to be in residence for the duration of the Final Examination Period. For the fall term, the Final Examination Period is Tuesday, December 10 through Thursday, December 19. For the spring term, the Final Examination Period is Thursday, May 7 through Saturday, May16.

 

Exam and Course Deadline Group

Fall Final/Midyear Examination

Spring Final Examination

1

Tuesday, Dec. 10

Thursday, May 7

2

Tuesday, Dec. 10

Thursday, May 7

3

Wednesday, Dec. 11

Friday, May 8

4

Wednesday, Dec. 11

Friday, May 8

5

Thursday, Dec. 12

Saturday, May 9

6

Thursday, Dec. 12

Saturday, May 9

7

Friday, Dec. 13

Monday, May 11

8

Friday, Dec. 13

Monday, May 11

9

Saturday, Dec. 14

Tuesday, May 12

10

Saturday, Dec. 14

Tuesday, May 12

11

Monday, Dec. 16

Wednesday, May 13

12

Monday, Dec. 16

Wednesday, May 13

13

Tuesday, Dec. 17

Thursday, May 14

14

Tuesday, Dec. 17

Thursday, May 14

15

Wednesday, Dec. 18

Friday, May 15

16

Wednesday, Dec. 18

Friday, May 15

17

Thursday, Dec. 19

Saturday, May 16

18

Thursday, Dec. 19

Saturday, May 16

 

Academic Information

The Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science Degrees

Requirements for the Degree

Credit Requirements

Residency Requirement

Requirements for the Degree

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences offers undergraduates a wide range of courses to satisfy individual objectives and interests. In defining the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees, the Faculty has sought to accommodate those objectives and interests and, at the same time, to establish a framework for study in the College that ensures involvement with important areas of general knowledge (the General Education requirements) and in-depth study of one specific area (the concentration requirement). In addition, students must demonstrate competence in certain skills reflective of the complex demands of modern society (writing, quantitative reasoning with data, and language requirements) and achieve a satisfactory level of performance in their work. Each of these requirements is set forth in detail below. (For the rules concerning the Bachelor of Science degree, see "Engineering Sciences".) Students are responsible for knowing the rules that apply to their candidacy for the AB or SB degree.

Exceptions to the rules may be made only by special vote of the Administrative Board of Harvard College (hereafter referred to as the Administrative Board) or by those administrative officers or committees to which the Faculty, for certain matters, has delegated authority to act on its behalf.

Credit Requirements

All candidates for the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree must pass 128 credits (the equivalent of thirty-two 4 credit courses) and receive letter grades of C– or higher in at least 84 credits of them (at least 96 credits to be eligible for a degree with honors). A “course” is equivalent to 4 credits and normally is the length of a semester; a “course” is equivalent to the “half-course” designation in earlier Handbooks. The only non-letter grade that counts toward the requirement of 84 satisfactory letter-graded credits is Satisfactory (SAT); only one (8 credit) senior tutorial course graded Satisfactory may be so counted. Credits taken either by cross-registration or out of residence for degree credit will not be counted toward the letter-graded credit requirement unless they are applied toward concentration requirements or the requirements for the Undergraduate Teacher Education Program (UTEP).

Forty-eight of the required 84 letter-graded credits should normally have been completed by the end of the sophomore year. Ordinarily, no first-year student or sophomore may take fewer than three letter-graded courses (4 credits per course) in any term. First-year students who wish to complete fewer than 16 credits per term must obtain the approval of their Resident Dean.

Advanced Standing students graduating in six semesters and sophomore transfer students (16 credits granted) must pass 96 credits at Harvard and receive letter grades of C– or higher in at least 60 of them (at least 72 to be eligible for a degree with honors). Advanced Standing students graduating in seven semesters must pass 112 credits at Harvard and receive letter grades of C– or higher in at least 72 of them (at least 84 to be eligible for a degree with honors). Junior transfer students (64 credits granted) must pass 64 credits at Harvard and receive letter grades of C– or higher in at least 40 of them (at least 48 to be eligible for a degree with honors). All degree recipients must have been degree candidates for at least four regular semesters and have passed at least 64 credits as degree candidates during regular terms (fall or spring semester) in Harvard College. The precise number of letter-graded credits with C– or higher required of transfer students will be subject to evaluation at the time of matriculation at Harvard.

Residency Requirement

Students will not ordinarily be recommended for the AB or SB degree without having paid for eight terms of residence. (Any student currently registered in the College is considered here to be “in residence,” regardless of actual domicile.) Exceptions to the residence requirements are made for students who graduate in fewer than eight terms by exercising Advanced Standing or who matriculated with transfer credit. Some students may complete Harvard degree requirements in fewer than eight terms as a result of course work done elsewhere that is approved in advance and counted by Harvard toward degree requirements (see Requirements for the Degree), or as a result of course work done at the Harvard Summer School (see Harvard Summer School), or as a result of having worked at a rate of more than sixteen credits per term.

No student will be recommended for the AB or the SB degree who has not completed a minimum of four regular terms in the College as a candidate for that degree and passed at least sixty- four credits during regular terms in Harvard College.

Students who have not completed the degree requirements within the allotted number of terms (“lost degree" candidates) may complete degree requirements only by enrolling in the Harvard Summer School, by successfully petitioning the Administrative Board for an additional term (see Additional Term), or, if eligible, by enrolling in a program of study approved by the Committee on Education Abroad (see Study Abroad).

 

College Requirements

General Education Requirement

The General Education program is the cornerstone of the Harvard College curriculum. Focusing on urgent problems and enduring questions, Gen Ed courses are unusually explicit in connecting the subjects students study to the people they will become and the world beyond the classroom. Transcending disciplinary divisions, these courses demonstrate the value of embedding what students will learn in their concentrations within the broader context of the liberal arts.

Starting in Fall 2019, students graduating in May 2020 or later must complete four General Education courses, one from each of the following four General Education categories:

  • Aesthetics & Culture 
    • Aesthetics and Culture courses engage diverse artistic genres and cultural traditions, helping students situate themselves and others as products of and participants in art and culture.
  • Ethics & Civics
    • Ethics and Civics courses engage with large questions about right and wrong, helping students grapple with the nature of civic virtue and the ethical dimensions of what they say and do.
  • Histories, Societies, Individuals
    • Histories, Societies, Individuals courses engage questions of identity and social change, helping students understand the histories and traditions that they will encounter in a global context.
  • Science & Technology in Society
    • Science and Technology in Society courses engage students in the study of scientific innovations and their social contexts, helping students assess the promise and pitfalls of current and future innovations using methods of scientific inquiry.

Three of these courses must be letter-graded. One may be taken pass/fail, with the permission of the instructor. However, if that same course is being used to fulfill a concentration or secondary field requirement, there may be limitations on pass/fail options. Students should check with their advisers.

There are no constraints regarding the timing of these courses, as long as all are completed by graduation.

General Education requirements will not be reduced for Advanced Standing, Transfer Students, or Term Time Study Abroad.

Only courses approved by the Standing Committee on General Education can be used to fulfill General Education requirements. Students may not petition to have courses count.

Designated Harvard Summer School and Harvard Summer Study Abroad courses may count for General Education. Ordinarily, summer courses count if they are identical to courses that receive General Education credit during the academic year and are taught by the same Harvard faculty members who teach them during the academic year (or by a member of the same department).

For questions, students should contact the General Education Office (617-495-2563, Smith Campus Center Fourth Floor).

 

Distribution Requirement

The distribution requirement exposes students to the diversity of scholarly disciplines at Harvard. Starting in Fall 2019, students graduating in May 2020 or later must complete one departmental (non-Gen Ed) course in each of the three main divisions of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) and the Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS):

  • Arts and Humanities
  • Social Sciences, and
  • Science and Engineering and Applied Science.

Courses used to fulfill the distribution requirement may be taken pass/fail, with the permission of the instructor. However, when the same courses are being used to fulfill a concentration or secondary field requirement, there may be limitations on pass/fail options. Students should check with their advisers.

All courses in every division will count toward the distribution requirement except elementary and intermediate-level languages, some graduate-only courses, courses in Expository Writing, and Freshman and House Seminars.

There are no constraints regarding the timing of these courses, as long as all are completed by graduation.

Transfer students may fulfill the distribution requirement with courses taken at their previous undergraduate institution. Courses taken during Term Time or Summer Study Abroad, and courses taken at Harvard Summer School may also count for the distribution requirement.

For questions, students should contact divdist@fas.harvard.edu.

 

Quantitative Reasoning with Data Requirement

The Quantitative Reasoning with Data requirement introduces students to mathematical, statistical, and computational methods that will enable students to think critically about data as it is employed in fields of inquiry across the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.

Starting in Fall 2019, students in the class of 2023 (and in later classes) must complete one course in Quantitative Reasoning with Data.

Students in the classes of 2020, 2021, 2022, and earlier must fulfill the QRD requirement by completing either one course that fulfilled the Empirical and Mathematical Reasoning requirement (to include courses in the departments of Applied Mathematics, Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics) or one course in Quantitative Reasoning with Data. Returning students can consult a list of courses previously approved for Empirical and Mathematical Reasoning.

Courses used to fulfill the Quantitative Reasoning with Data requirement may be taken pass/fail, with the permission of the instructor. However, when the same courses are being used to fulfill a concentration or secondary field requirement, there may be limitations on pass/fail options. Students should check with their advisers.

There are no constraints regarding the timing of this requirement, as long as it is completed by graduation.

For questions, students should contact qrd@fas.harvard.edu.

 

Expository Writing Requirement

Degree candidates admitted as first-year students must enroll during their first year of residence in a prescribed course in expository writing offered by the Harvard College Writing Program. A final grade of D– or better in Expository Writing 20 ordinarily fulfills the writing requirement; however, the Director of the Harvard College Writing Program may require particular students to do additional work during the following term in order to satisfy the requirement. Courses taken on a Pass/Fail basis may not be used to fulfill the Harvard College writing requirement. Harvard Summer School courses in expository writing or creative writing may not be used to fulfill the Harvard College writing requirement. Harvard Summer School courses in expository writing may not be used for degree credit.

All transfer students are expected to satisfy the same writing requirement as students admitted as first-year students unless they have demonstrated superior writing ability in the English language before they arrive at Harvard. Transfer students who seek exemption from the writing requirement must provide the Director of the Harvard College Writing Program with a substantial sample of their own written work in the summer before matriculation at Harvard. Such a sample should include at least twenty double-spaced, typewritten pages. Papers submitted to and evaluated by a faculty member at the college the student attended before coming to Harvard constitute an appropriate sample. The Director will evaluate the papers and decide if an exemption should be granted. Transfer students seeking exemption should contact the Harvard College Writing Program at 617-495-2566 or expos@fas.harvard.edu for more information.

Any student who fails to complete the writing requirement during the first year of residence must enroll in an appropriate Expository Writing course during each subsequent term of residence until the requirement is met.

 

Language Requirement

Degree candidates must meet a language requirement in a language other than English that is taught at Harvard or for which an appropriate examination can be given. The College affirms that the learning of a language other than English is an essential component of a liberal arts and sciences education and that this learning should allow a student to develop first-hand understanding of linguistic and cultural variety.  The language requirement demands rigorous study but does not require a particular format of study or examination.  Students should be taught in all forms of a language that are customary in the practice of that language. The requirement can be satisfied in one of the following ways:

  • Earning a minimum score of 700 on a College Entrance Examination Board SAT II Test in a language other than English, a score of 5 on a relevant Advanced Placement examination, or a score of 7 on a relevant International Baccalaureate examination;
  • Earning a passing score as determined by the department on a placement examination administered by certain language departments;
  • Passing with a letter grade one appropriate year-long course (8 credits) or two semester-long courses (4 credits each) in one language at Harvard, or the equivalent as determined by the appropriate language department. These courses may not include foreign literature courses conducted in English;
  • Passing with a letter grade a language course or courses at the appropriate level taken in Harvard programs abroad, as approved by the appropriate language department. Study completed at other institutions may also fulfill the requirement if approved by the appropriate language department whether through examination or on the basis of achieving a minimum grade;
  • A student whose high school education was conducted in a language other than English may satisfy the language requirement with evidence of the official high school transcript.
  • A student who claims fluency in a language other than English may satisfy the language requirement through satisfactory completion of an examination in the relevant language, provided that an appropriate examination can be given.  If the language is not one that is offered at Harvard, and if a qualified examiner, as determined by the Office of Undergraduate Education, cannot be identified, the student must meet the language requirement with another language.
  • No student may take the relevant departmental examination more than once for the purpose of meeting the language requirement.

Details on language placement exams, including the process for registering for these exams and FAQs, can be found on the Placement Exams Information website.

Any student who has not met the language requirement upon entrance ordinarily is required to enroll in and complete with a passing letter grade an appropriate year-long language course (8 credits) or two semester-long language courses (4 credits each) in a single language before the start of the junior year. (An appropriate course is one for which a student qualifies by previous instruction or placement test.) Most introductory courses in all languages taught at Harvard may count towards fulfillment of the language requirement; exceptions are noted in the course listings in my.harvard.

Exceptions to the ordinary means of satisfying the requirement, or to the timing of the requirement, can be granted only by the Administrative Board upon the recommendation of the student’s Resident Dean. Students who fail to meet the requirement by the beginning of the junior year, or in the timeframe specified by the Administrative Board, are subject to disciplinary action.

Placement exams in a few languages will be available online to entering students over the summer before they arrive at Harvard; students looking to place into courses in these languages, or who plan to satisfy the language requirement in these languages, are strongly encouraged to take the exam over the summer before the start of their first year. A student whose score on the online exam indicates sufficient mastery of the language to satisfy the requirement will need to take a brief, proctored follow-up exam after arriving on campus and before the course registration deadline. Placement exams in these languages, as well as many others, will also be administered to first-year students at a designated time during Opening Days. Upperclassmen interested in taking a language placement exam should be in touch with the relevant department prior to the start of the term.

Students wishing to fulfill the language requirement in a language for which the College does not provide a standard placement exam will need to consult with the the Office of Undergraduate Education by contacting placement-help@fas.harvard.edu as soon as possible upon admission to the College. Students may request to take a special examination in any language in which an appropriate examination can be given by a member of the Faculty familiar with the standards of the language requirement or by a qualified examiner identified by the Office of Undergraduate Education. Special language examinations will be scheduled as quickly as possible, but students should plan to take either a placement examination in another language if possible or a first-year course in another language to maximize their options pending the result of the special examination. Students who plan to fulfill the language requirement by special examination should consult with their Resident Dean prior to registering for courses.

Students who plan to continue language study beyond the requirement level may wish to qualify for a citation in that language (see Citations in Foreign Language.)

 

The Core Curriculum Requirement

All students who entered Harvard College prior to September 2009 must meet the requirements of the Core Curriculum in order to graduate, unless they choose to switch to the Program in General Education. Students should consult the General Education Office (gened@fas.harvard.edu, 617-495-2563, Smith Campus Center Fourth Floor) to discuss options for completing Core Curriculum requirements or for switching to General Education requirements.

 

The Concentration Requirement

All degree candidates must fulfill the requirements of one of the recognized fields of concentration, an approved joint concentration, or an approved special concentration. A student’s concentration is a commitment to a particular discipline, field, or specialization. All concentrations provide students with opportunities for appreciating, assimilating, and making applications of a coherent body of knowledge.

Harvard currently offers fifty fields of concentration, some of which have multiple tracks. Each concentration is overseen by a faculty member serving as the Head Tutor or the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Overviews of each concentration, its specific requirements, and how to obtain more information about the concentration are included in Fields of Concentration and Secondary Fields.

In many concentrations, students may pursue either a basic program or one that makes them eligible for honors in the field. Honors-eligible programs generally differ from basic programs in that they require a senior thesis and/or advanced course work. To be awarded the degree with honors in the field of concentration, the student must complete the honors requirements within the concentration, receive an honors recommendation from the department or committee that supervises the concentration, and meet the College-wide requirements for an honors degree. Students should understand that completing the degree requirements for an honors-eligible program does not guarantee that they will graduate with honors (see "Requirements for Honors Degrees”).

Several concentrations may limit enrollment by selecting their concentrators from those students who apply. These concentrations include Environmental Science and Public Policy; History and Literature; Comparative Literature; and Art, Film, and Visual Studies. Each of these programs attempts to select those students whose needs and interests will best be served by its offerings and will admit as many students as its teaching resources allow.

 

Choosing a Concentration

The choice of a concentration is an important decision, requiring inquiry and reasoned judgment and some creative research on the part of the student. First-Year student advisers, sophomore advisers, other resident advisers, concentration advisers, and faculty are available to help students make this decision. Fields of Concentration and Secondary Fields lists the names of individuals who can provide specific information about each concentration. Students may also consult the Advising Programs Office website for up-to-date contact information.

Students should plan their concentration program with a representative of the concentration who will approve the Declaration of Concentration and Plan of Study. This procedure constitutes official admission to the field of concentration. Students ordinarily must fulfill concentration requirements as they were defined in Fields of Concentration and Secondary Fields the year the Plan of Study was approved, although in those situations in which a concentration subsequently changes its requirements, the Head Tutor or Director of Undergraduate Studies may allow students to substitute the new requirements.

Students who entered as first-year students in the fall of 2006 or later must submit a completed Declaration of Concentration and Plan of Study using the Declaration of Concentration tool via my.harvard near the end of the fall term of their second year (see “Academic Calendar” for specific deadlines). Students who are out of sequence because of leaves or withdrawals must submit a completed Declaration of Concentration and Plan of Study no later than two weeks before the end of classes of their third term of enrollment. An overdue declaration will make the student liable for a late fee of $25 for the first week, $50 thereafter, and for disciplinary action. Students who are working at a reduced rate should consult the Office of Undergraduate Education to determine the appropriate filing deadline.

As preparation for choosing a concentration, every student is required to have a documented advising conversation with a representative from one or more prospective concentrations near the end of the second term of enrollment. In order to facilitate these conversations, the Advising Programs Office works in conjunction with the concentrations to hold advising conversation events during Advising Fortnight, which begins one week after the conclusion of spring recess. These advising conversations do not indicate any binding decision on the part of the student. Concentrations choose their own criteria for defining these advising conversations, so the form and context may vary from program to program. Please consult the Advising Programs Office for more information at advising@fas.harvard.edu.

 

Changing Concentrations

After submitting a Declaration of Concentration and Plan of Study, students may change concentrations or add or delete a field that forms part of a joint concentration by using the Declaration of Concentration tool via my.harvard. Because there are implications with respect to a student’s overall academic program when changing the field of concentration, students should consult with and have the petition approved by both the Head Tutor or Director of Undergraduate Studies of the proposed new concentration and their Resident Dean before formally filing a change of concentration.

A change of field on the student record and transcript is not complete until the petition has been approved by the department and the change is reflected on my.harvard.

After the deadline for degree applications in a student’s final term in the College, a change of concentration will be granted only with the approval of the Administrative Board. Ordinarily, approval will be granted to facilitate a student’s completion of degree requirements, but not to enhance the level of honors awarded.

 

Joint Concentrations

Every year, some students find that their interests are best accommodated by pursuing a joint concentration that combines two fields. The two fields combined in a joint concentration must each be an undergraduate concentration offered in its own right. A joint concentration is meant to integrate the two fields into a coherent plan of study and ordinarily culminates in an interdisciplinary thesis written while enrolled in the thesis tutorial of one concentration only. Some concentrations do not participate in joint concentration programs. Students should consult with the Head Tutor or Director of Undergraduate Study in the relevant fields for more information.

For students who do not wish to integrate the work of two separate fields into one coherent program, but wish still to pursue a second disciplinary area, a secondary field option may be more appropriate (see Fields of Concentration and Secondary Fields).

Students who wish to combine two fields in a joint concentration must file with the Registrar a Declaration of Concentration and Plan of Study that designates the two fields and has been approved by both concentrations. One of the concentrations is designated the primary concentration. To grant approval, both of the participating concentrations must be satisfied with the coherence and merit of the student’s plan and be prepared to supervise the program in detail. Nevertheless, students who undertake joint concentrations often find that they themselves must take some initiative in ensuring communication between the advisers of the two fields and in keeping these advisers apprised of their progress and their needs. Any student combining fields who wishes to change or eliminate one of the fields must submit a Change of Field of Concentration using the Declaration of Concentration tool via my.harvard by the degree application deadline in the student’s final term at the College.

 

Special Concentrations

Each year there are a few students whose particular objectives require that they pursue a program of their own design. Under the guidance of a Resident Dean and faculty advisers, and with the cooperation of the appropriate departments, these students may propose concentration programs to the Faculty Standing Committee on Degrees in Special Concentrations (see Special Concentrations in Fields of Concentration). In making its decisions, the committee looks for coherence in the program as well as an appropriate balance of breadth and depth, the student’s ability to thrive outside the standard concentration structures, and the availability of appropriate academic resources. Students often find it useful to enter such programs in the junior year after spending part of the sophomore year in one of the established concentrations.

Students interested in pursuing a Special Concentration should consult with the Director of Undergraduate Studies for Special Concentrations, who can provide advice about constructing a plan of study and about the application process. The committee meets to consider applications three times per year. Those students whose applications are accepted must submit a Change of Field of Concentration using the Declaration of Concentration tool via my.harvard.

 

Tutorial

Each field of concentration has jurisdiction, within FAS guidelines, over its own tutorial program. These programs are outlined under the individual requirements for each field in Fields of Concentration and Secondary Fields. Except for those tutorial courses graded SAT/UNS (see Non-Letter Grades for more information), letter grades ordinarily are reported for tutorials given for credit. A field of concentration may bar any student from the tutorial program because of unsatisfactory work.

Ordinarily, the work in a senior tutorial centers on the writing of a thesis. A student who does not complete the thesis but nevertheless wishes to receive credit for the tutorial course may be required by the concentration to submit a paper or other substantial piece of work before any credit can be awarded. Students are advised to learn in advance whether their concentration has such a requirement.

 

General Examinations

Some concentrations require that students pass a General Examination before being recommended for the degree or being recommended for the degree with honors in the field. These examinations are often designed to test a student’s understanding of the entire field of concentration rather than detailed knowledge of the subject matter of such courses as have been taken in that field. Through their courses, independent reading, or any other effective means, students are expected to have attained a grasp of the intellectual approaches underpinning their field of concentration and to be able to apply that thinking. No student concentrating in a field where General Examinations are required is eligible for the degree, whatever the student’s record in courses may be, until the student has passed this examination to the satisfaction of the concentration.

Students in concentrations with General Examinations should consult with the concentration's tutorial office about the scheduling of these examinations. In some cases, General Examinations are scheduled for the spring term only. As a result, students who will complete all other academic requirements (including the thesis) in the fall term and do not plan to enroll for the spring term may need to speak with their concentration, their Resident Dean and the Registrar in order to sit for the General Examination.

 

Accessible Education

The Accessible Education Office (AEO) serves as the central campus resource for students who have disability-related accessibility needs at Harvard College, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS), and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS). AEO staff are available for both general consultations and more structured Access Meetings to determine formal accommodation plans, and some students may simply want to discuss difficult situations and not request any accommodations at all. The accommodation process for students with disabilities in University-sponsored programs and activities is a collaborative one, with students expected to take the lead in self-disclosing to AEO in a timely manner, providing requested documentation that will assist in determining reasonable accommodations.

Students are encouraged to make initial contact with AEO upon admission or as soon as health-related concerns arise. To begin the registration process, students are asked to fill out a form on the AEO website under the new or returning student section. A staff member will then reach out to schedule a meeting to discuss together the impact of potentially inaccessible environments and course elements that may require academic adjustments or the use of auxiliary aids. Students may want to learn more about permanent or temporary academic or housing accommodations, accessible transportation, assistive technology, and other academic adjustments by reviewing the website and contacting AEO directly. For a more comprehensive description of AEO services, policies and documentation requirements, visit the AEO website, contact AEO at aeo@fas.harvard.edu, or call 617-496-8707. Students who are dissatisfied with their accommodations may wish to exercise their right to submit a grievance and may refer to the AEO website for details about the grievance procedure.

Other Academic Opportunities

Secondary Fields

Study Abroad

Citations in a Foreign Language

Advanced Standing

Study at Other Boston-Area Institutions

Teacher Education Programs

Research & Scholarly Integrity

Secondary Fields

Secondary fields provide the opportunity for focused study (four to six courses) outside of the primary area of concentration, but they are entirely optional and are not required for graduation. A secondary field may complement the primary area of study in the concentration, or it may be entirely separate. Unlike a joint concentration, no integrative work between the secondary field and the primary concentration is required. The successful completion of a secondary field will appear on a student’s transcript. No student may receive credit for more than one secondary field.

While secondary fields provide new opportunities for Harvard College students, they also come at a cost. Students who pursue a secondary field will have fewer free electives and may have to give up some advanced work or research opportunities in the concentration. Interested students should discuss the possibilities of work in a secondary field with the relevant adviser in the sponsoring program. They are also encouraged to discuss their plans with the Head Tutor or Director of Undergraduate Studies in their own concentration, with their Resident Dean, or with other academic advisers before embarking on a secondary field program.

Each secondary field program has its own set of requirements, and some programs offer multiple options for a secondary field. A few rules, however, apply to all programs: only one course (4 credits) may count simultaneously towards a secondary field and the concentration; courses taken through cross-registration (if allowed by the secondary field program) will not count towards the College grade point average; and students must adhere to the guidelines and procedures for obtaining credit for study abroad in order to count such courses for a secondary field.

No student may sign up for a secondary field before declaring a concentration. Students are responsible for notifying secondary fields of their interest in the program, for tracking their requirements, for obtaining required signatures, and for submitting all electronic information and signed paperwork to the Office of the Registrar no later than the deadline published in this Handbook.

See Secondary Fields for a list of programs and their requirements. The online tool for tracking requirements and sending electronic information to the Registrar is also available on this site.

Study Abroad

Harvard views study abroad as an invaluable part of every student’s undergraduate education, through encouraging students to explore the possibilities of earning degree credit by studying in another country. Details about term-time study abroad may be found on the Office of International Education (OIE) website.

Options for Study Abroad

Rising sophomores, juniors and seniors may study abroad through direct enrollment in a foreign university, in programs sponsored by U.S. universities, or in programs organized through private study abroad organizations. The OIE maintains a list of approved programs, which is reviewed and updated on a regular basis. If a student finds a program that is not on the approved list, the student must follow the formal petition process for approval.

Getting Started

It is important to begin the study abroad planning process early: first-year students are encouraged to begin thinking about how to incorporate this important part of their Harvard experience into their studies. A student should seek assistance from the Office of International Education as well as their concentration Head Tutor, Director of Undergraduate Studies, and their Resident Dean for more specific information.

Applying to Study Abroad

Each application to study abroad is a two-part application process. Students must apply directly to the foreign school or study abroad program for admission, and to the OIE for transfer credit.

Online application instructions and materials are available on the OIE website. The deadlines for submitting applications are as follows:

  • For Fall Term study: March 1
  • For Spring Term study: October 1
  • For Summer study: Summer Funding, early February;
                                   General, April 1

Students should carefully monitor the OIE website for updated or changed information. 

To be approved for study abroad, a student must be in good academic and disciplinary standing during the term immediately preceding the proposed period of study. Unless granted permission by the Administrative Board in advance, a student cannot be granted degree credit for course work that begins when the student is on probation for any reason.

OIE suggests that students consult the OIE website for detailed guidance on the process for obtaining credit for study abroad, and for links to various electronic resources.

The Harvard College Policy on Undergraduate Travel Abroad clarifies specifics regarding credit and sponsorship for undergraduates wishing to travel internationally. Students can find this policy as well as pre-departure health and safety requirements on the Harvard Global Support Services website.

Students eligible for financial aid must submit a Financial Aid Supplement to the Griffin Financial Aid Office, and consult their designated financial aid officer for more detailed information.

All students earning credit abroad during the academic year will be assessed the student services fee; students will also automatically be billed for health insurance, which may be waived by the deadline with proof of comparable coverage.

Students abroad will maintain their Harvard University Identification Number (HUID) and Personal Identification Number (PIN), and will retain access to Harvard libraries and services.

Students may consult the Office of Career Services, and the Funding Sources Database for more information about summer funding opportunities.

Earning Degree Credit for Study Abroad

Students participating in term-time for-credit study abroad, will reduce by one the number of terms for which they may register at Harvard College.

It is expected that students who study abroad for a semester or academic year will take a full-course-load, as determined and approved by the OIE, and consistent with the College's policies for students studying on campus.

Credits earned abroad are considered transfer credit, for which up to a full year of credit may be earned. No more than 16 credits may be earned per term for term-time study abroad, and no more than 8 credits may be earned per summer for summer study abroad. A maximum total of 32 transfer credits may be earned from studying abroad. Credit earned abroad may transfer in as concentration and/or elective credit and may also contribute to a secondary field or language citation. Additionally, students may take courses to satisfy the Harvard College departmental distribution requirement. Specific information about these options is provided through the Office of Undergraduate Education or by emailing divdist@fas.harvard.edu

Students planning to study abroad in non-English speaking countries are encouraged to complete at least one year of study in the host country’s language before studying abroad. Additionally, students are expected to take either a language instruction course or a course taught entirely in a language of the host country.

Harvard does not ordinarily grant credit for study out of residence at other U.S. institutions, except in rare cases when such study is judged to offer a “special opportunity” unavailable to the student at Harvard. Information on the process for petitioning for credit for study out of residence within the U.S. can be obtained from the student’s Resident Dean; if the student’s petition is approved by the Administrative Board, the OIE will be notified by the appropriate Dean and will instruct the student on how to apply for transfer credit.

Citations in a Foreign Language

Advanced training in a foreign language is a valuable component of a liberal arts education; it allows students to employ another language in cultural exchange, research, and work. To foster such training, many of the “language and literature” and “language and civilization” departments offer programs in which undergraduates may earn a citation in a modern or ancient language. Those languages in which citations are offered and the specific requirements for each are listed below. The award of a foreign language citation will be noted on the transcript at the time degrees are voted, and will be included in the commencement program. Students will also receive printed citations along with their diplomas.

Each language citation program consists of four courses (4 credits per course or equivalent) of language instruction beyond the first-year level and/or courses taught primarily in the foreign language. At least two of these courses must be at the third-year level or beyond. Appropriate courses taken in approved programs of study out of residence for which the student receives Harvard degree credit may be counted toward a citation. Courses that satisfy the requirements for a citation may also be counted toward the distribution requirement, Secondary Field, and/or concentration requirements, as appropriate.

Students must complete all courses to count toward the citation with letter grades of B– or better. Regardless of the level at which a student enters a language program at Harvard, all citations require the completion of four courses (4 credits per course or equivalent) taken at Harvard or counted for Harvard degree credit. Language courses that meet these criteria but are bracketed on the transcript may be counted toward a language citation. Some programs require that courses be taken in a particular sequence; students should consult the relevant language advisers for more information.

Students who plan to satisfy the requirements for a foreign language citation must complete a Foreign Language Citation Study Plan with the Head Tutor or Director of Undergraduate Studies of the relevant department and file this form with the Registrar no later than the deadline for degree applications in their final term in the College. Students are encouraged to file their intentions to satisfy the requirements for a foreign language citation as early as the declaration of a concentration so that they may benefit from advising by the department that will provide the recognition. Students will benefit from planning ahead and taking courses in consecutive terms, so as not to lose ground between language courses; this is especially important at the early stages of language study. Students planning their courses around study undertaken while abroad must consult with relevant advisers and obtain pre-approval of all courses they hope to count towards the citation, as such courses must be taken for Harvard degree credit. Those students who later decide not to complete the requirements for a citation in a foreign language are asked to complete a new Plan of Study indicating this fact in order to inform the relevant department and the Registrar.

Concentrators, including joint concentrators, in African and African American Studies, the Classics, East Asian Studies, Germanic Languages and Literatures, Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, Romance Languages and Literatures, Slavic Languages and Literatures, or South Asian Studies, whose concentration work is built on a particular language or set of languages, are not also eligible for citations in those languages.

American Sign Language (ASL)

A citation in ASL requires four courses: Ling 73c, Ling 73d, Ling 90a, and Ling 90b. Language courses at or above this level of ASL taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for these courses only after assessment via consultation with the ASL Language Coordinator. 

African Languages (See Gikuyu, Igbo, Swahili, Twi, Yoruba, Zulu)

For all other African languages, please consult the Director of the African Language Program.

Classical Arabic

Four of the following courses: Arabic Ba, 130a, 130b, 140, 141, 160r, 240r, 245r, 248r.

Other courses taught primarily in Arabic or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for the above courses with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations concentration.

Modern Standard Arabic

Four of the following courses, including at least two from the third-year or beyond list:

Second-year level: Arabic 110, Bb.

Third-year or beyond: Arabic 131a, 131b, 241a, 241b.

Other courses taught primarily in Arabic or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for the above courses with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations concentration.

Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian (BCS)

Four courses beyond the Elementary level (beyond the A-level courses BCS Aa-Ab). Typically the citation consists of two semesters of Intermediate BCS (BCS Ba-Bb) and two semesters of Advanced BCS (BCS Cr).

Courses taken out of residence (language study abroad) for Harvard degree credit or Slavic 91r (if conducted in BCS) may be substituted for these courses with the permission of the Director of the Slavic Language Program or the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Slavic Languages and Literatures concentration. 

Catalan

Consult the Director of Language Programs in Romance Languages and Literatures for information on a citation in Catalan.

Chinese

Four courses beyond the first-year level. Choose courses from the following, of which at least two must be at the third-year level or beyond:

Second-year level: Chinese 120a, 120b, 123xb.

Third-year level or beyond: Chinese 130a, 130b, 130xa, 130xb, 140a, 140b, 140xa, 140xb, 150a, 150b, 163, 166r, 168r, 187.

Chinese Ba, Bb and Bx do not count for a language citation.

Other courses taught primarily in Mandarin Chinese or language courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for the above courses only after assessment via a Chinese placement test and with the permission of the East Asian Language Coordinator (eal@fas.harvard.edu).

Students who plan to satisfy the requirements for a foreign language citation in Chinese must complete a Foreign Language Citation Study Plan with the Language Program Coordinator in EALC (5 Bryant St., Room 205, eal@fas.harvard.edu).

Literary Chinese

Chinese 106a, 106b, 107a, and 107b.

More advanced courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for these courses with the permission of the East Asian Language Coordinator (eal@ fas.harvard.edu).

Students who plan to satisfy the requirements for a foreign language citation in Literary Chinese must complete a Foreign Language Citation Study Plan with the Language Program Coordinator in EALC (5 Bryant St., Room 205, eal@fas.harvard.edu).

Czech

Four courses beyond the Elementary level (beyond the A-level courses Czech Aa-Ab). Typically the citation consists of two semesters of Intermediate Czech (Czech Ba-Bb) and two semesters of Advanced Czech (Czech Cr).

Courses taken out of residence (language study abroad) for Harvard degree credit or Slavic 91r (if conducted in Czech) may be substituted for these courses with the permission of the Director of the Slavic Language Program or the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Slavic Languages and Literatures concentration.

Danish

Two courses beyond beginning Danish (Scandinavian 90r.a-c) and two further courses conducted in Danish. These may consist of any tutorial in Danish, Supervised Reading and Research conducted on Danish (Scandinavian 91r), or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit and approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Scandinavian.

Finnish

Two courses beyond beginning Finnish (Scandinavian 90r.a-c) and two further courses conducted in Finnish. These may consist of any tutorial in Finnish, Supervised Reading and Research conducted on Finnish (Scandinavian 91r), or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit and approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Scandinavian.

French

Four of the following courses: French 20, 30, 40, 50, or any French course at 60 or above conducted in French.

Other courses taught primarily in French or a maximum of two courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for the above courses with the permission of the undergraduate adviser in French or the Director of Language Programs for RLL.

Students who plan to satisfy the requirements for a foreign language citation in French must complete a Foreign Language Citation Study Plan with the Director of Language Programs in Romance Languages and Literatures (Boylston Hall 436, 617-495-2524).

German

Four of the following courses: German 20a, 20b, any 60-level course, 101, 102, or any 100-level or 200-level course conducted in German. German 20ab earns 8 credits.

Other courses taught primarily in German or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for the above courses with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies in German.

Gikuyu

The equivalent of four courses selected from among the following: Gikuyu B (a year-long course; 8 credits), Gikuyu 101ar, Gikuyu 101br, or AAAS 90r (if conducted in Gikuyu, with permission from the Director of the Language Program).

Other advanced courses in Gikuyu taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit or AAAS 91r (if conducted in Gikuyu) may be substituted for these courses with permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Department of African and African American Studies. In the case of summer study, the course must last six weeks or consist of at least 50 class hours; in addition, students must submit some graded written work done for the course.

Greek

Four courses chosen from the following: Greek 2x, 3, H, K, or any 10-level or 100-level Greek course, including those in Byzantine Greek. At least two of the courses must be 100-level, Greek H, or Greek K.

Other advanced courses or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for one or more of the above with the permission of the Preceptor in Ancient Greek and Classical Latin, Dr. Ivy Livingston (livings@fas.harvard.edu).

Modern Greek

Four courses (or equivalent) chosen from the following: Modern Greek B (a year-long course; 8 credits) or any 100-level course in which the reading is done in Modern Greek.

Other advanced courses or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for one or more of the above with the permission of the Preceptor in Modern Greek, Dr. Calliope Dourou (dourou@fas.harvard.edu).

Classical Hebrew

Four of the following courses: Classical Hebrew 120a, 120b, 130ar, 130br; Hebrew 150a, 150b, 153, 165, 168, 171, 174, 176.

More advanced courses or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for these courses with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations concentration.

Modern Hebrew

Four of the following courses: Modern Hebrew 120a, 120b, 130r, 131r, or Near Eastern Civilizations 91r if focused on contemporary Israeli literature and culture and conducted in modern Hebrew at the third-year level or beyond.

Courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for two of these four courses with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations concentration.

Hindi-Urdu

The equivalent of four terms selected from among the following: Hindi-Urdu 102 (a full course), 103a, 103b, 104, 105r, 106.

Courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit or other advanced courses may be substituted with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for South Asian Studies

Icelandic

Two courses beyond beginning Icelandic (Scandinavian 90r.a-c) and two further courses conducted in Icelandic. These may consist of any tutorial in Icelandic, Supervised Reading and Research conducted on Icelandic (Scandinavian 91r), or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit and approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Scandinavian.

Igbo

Four terms of AAAS 90r (conducted in Igbo), beyond the first year of language study. Two courses must be at the third-year level or beyond.

Other advanced Igbo courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit or AAAS 91r (if conducted in Igbo) may be substituted for these courses with permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Department of African and African American Studies. In the case of summer study, the course must last six weeks or consist of at least 50 class hours; in addition, students must submit some graded written work done for the course.

Italian

Four of the following courses: Italian 20, 30, 40, 50, or any Italian course at 60 or above conducted in Italian.

Other courses taught primarily in Italian or a maximum of two courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for the above courses with the permission of the undergraduate adviser in Italian or the Director of Language Programs for RLL.

Students who plan to satisfy the requirements for a foreign language citation in Italian must complete a Foreign Language Citation Study Plan with the Director of Language Programs in Romance Languages and Literatures (Boylston Hall 436, 617-495-2524).

Japanese

Four courses from the following: Japanese 120a, 120b, 130a, 130b, 140a, 140b, 150a, 150b.

Language courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for these courses only after assessment via a Japanese placement test and with the permission of the East Asian Language Coordinator (eal@fas.harvard.edu).

Students who plan to satisfy the requirements for a foreign language citation in Japanese must complete a Foreign Language Citation Study Plan with the Language Program Coordinator in EALC (5 Bryant St., Room 205, eal@fas.harvard.edu).

Korean

Four courses from the following: Korean 120a, 120b, 123xb,130a, 130b, 140a, 140b, 150a, 150b.

Language courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for these courses only after assessment via a Korean placement test and with the permission of the East Asian Language Coordinator (eal@fas.harvard.edu).

Students who plan to satisfy the requirements for a foreign language citation in Korean must complete a Foreign Language Citation Study Plan with the Language Program Coordinator in EALC (5 Bryant St., Room 205, eal@fas.harvard.edu).

Latin

Four courses chosen from the following: Latin 2x, 3, H, K, or any 10-level or 100-level Latin course, including those in Medieval Latin. At least two of the courses must be 100-level, Latin H, or Latin K.

Other advanced courses or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for one or more of the above courses with the permission of the  Preceptor in Ancient Greek and Classical Latin, Dr. Ivy Livingston (livings@fas.harvard.edu).

Norwegian

Two courses beyond beginning Norwegian (Scandinavian 90r.a-c) and two further courses conducted in Norwegian. These may consist of any tutorial in Norwegian, Supervised Reading and Research conducted on Norwegian (Scandinavian 91r), or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit and approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Scandinavian.

Persian

Persian 120a, 120b, 140ar, 140br.

More advanced courses or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for these courses with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations concentration.

Polish

Four courses beyond the Elementary level (beyond the A-level courses Polish Aa-Ab). Typically the citation consists of two semesters of Intermediate Polish (Polish Ba-Bb) and two semesters of Advanced Polish (Polish Cr).

Courses taken out of residence (language study abroad) for Harvard degree credit or Slavic 91r (if conducted in Polish) may be substituted for these courses with the permission of the Director of the Slavic Language Program or the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Slavic Languages and Literatures concentration.

Portuguese

Four of the following courses: Portuguese 20, 30, 40, 50, or any Portuguese course at 60 or above conducted in Portuguese.

Other courses taught primarily in Portuguese or a maximum of two courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for the above courses with the permission of the undergraduate adviser in Portuguese or the Director of Language Programs for RLL.

Students who plan to satisfy the requirements for a foreign language citation in Portuguese must complete a Foreign Language Citation Study Plan with the Director of Language Programs in Romance Languages and Literatures (Boylston Hall 436, 617-495-2524).

Russian

Four courses beyond the Polish A-level courses selected from among the following: Russian Ba-Bb, Russian Bta-Btb, or Russian Bab (the equivalent of two semesters), Russian 101, Russian 103, Russian 102, or any advanced Russian language courses (Russian 111, 112, 113, 114, 115).

Other courses taken out of residence (language study abroad) for Harvard degree credit or Slavic 91r (if conducted in Russian) may be substituted for these courses with the permission of the Director of the Slavic Language Program or the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Slavic Languages and Literatures concentration.

Sanskrit

Sanskrit 102ar, 102br, and any two courses in Sanskrit beyond 102br.

Courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit or Sanskrit 91r may be substituted for these courses with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for South Asian Studies.

Slavic Languages

See Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian (BCS), Czech, Polish, Russian, and Ukrainian.

For information about studying other Slavic languages, please speak with the Director of the Slavic Language Program or the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Spanish

Four of the following courses: Spanish 20, 30, 40, 50, or any Spanish course at 60 or above conducted in Spanish.

Other courses taught primarily in Spanish or a maximum of two courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for the above courses with the permission of the undergraduate adviser in Spanish or the Director of Language Programs in RLL.

Students who plan to satisfy the requirements for a foreign language citation in Spanish must complete a Foreign Language Citation Study Plan with the Director of Language Programs in Romance Languages and Literatures (Boylston Hall 436, 617-495-2524).

Swahili

The equivalent of four terms selected from among the following: Swahili B (a year-long course; 8 credits), Swahili 101ar, Swahili 101br, or AAAS 90r (if conducted in Swahili, with permission from the Director of the Language Program).

Other advanced courses in Swahili taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit or AAAS 91r (if conducted in Swahili) may be substituted for these courses with permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Department of African and African American Studies. In the case of summer study, the course must last six weeks or consist of at least 50 class hours; in addition, students must submit some graded written work done for the course.

Swedish

Four courses beyond the first-year level, including Swedish 20 and two courses in Swedish language and culture at the third-year level or above. These may consist of any tutorial or 100-level course conducted in Swedish, Supervised Reading and Research courses conducted in Swedish (Scandinavian 91r), or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit and approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Scandinavian.

Tamil

Tamil 102a, 102b, and any two courses beyond 102b.

Courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit or other advanced courses may be substituted with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for South Asian Studies.

Classical Tibetan

Tibetan 102a, 102b, and any two 200-level courses in Tibetan.

Courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit or other advanced courses may be substituted with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for South Asian Studies.

Turkish

Four of the following courses: Turkish 120a, 120b, 130a, 130b, 149.

More advanced courses or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for these courses with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations concentration.

Twi

The equivalent of four terms selected from among the following: Twi B (a year-long course; 8 credits), Twi 101ar, Twi 101br, or AAAS 90r (if conducted in Twi, with permission from the Director of the Language Program).

Other advanced courses in Twi taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit or AAAS 91r (if conducted in Twi) may be substituted for these courses with permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Department of African and African American Studies. In the case of summer study, the course must last six weeks or consist of at least 50 class hours; in addition, students must submit some graded written work done for the course.

Ukrainian

Four courses beyond the Elementary level (beyond the A-level courses Ukrainian Aa-Ab). Typically the citation consists of two semesters of Intermediate Ukrainian (Ukrainian Ba-Bb) and two semesters of Advanced Ukrainian (Ukrainian Cr).

Courses taken out of residence (language study abroad) for Harvard degree credit or Slavic 91r (if conducted in Ukrainian) may be substituted for these courses with the permission of the Director of the Slavic Language Program or the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Slavic Languages and Literatures concentration.

Urdu (see Hindi-Urdu)

Vietnamese

Four courses from the following: Vietnamese 120a, 120b, 130a, 130b, 140, and 140b.

Language courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for these courses only after assessment via a Vietnamese placement test and with the permission of the East Asian Language Coordinator (eal@fas.harvard.edu).

Students who plan to satisfy the requirements for a foreign language citation in Vietnamese must complete a Foreign Language Citation Study Plan with the Language Program Coordinator in EALC (5 Bryant St., Room 205, eal@fas.harvard.edu).

Yiddish

The equivalent of four terms selected from among the following: Yiddish B, Ca, Cb, 102r, 103r, 105, 200r, 202r, 204.

Other courses taught primarily in Yiddish or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for the above courses with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations concentration.

Yoruba

The equivalent of four terms selected from among the following: Yoruba B (a year-long course; 8 credits), Yoruba 101ar, Yoruba 101br, or AAAS 90r (if conducted in Yoruba, with permission from the Director of the Language Program).

Other advanced courses in Yoruba taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit or AAAS 91r (if conducted in Yoruba) may be substituted for these courses with permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Department of African and African American Studies. In the case of summer study, the course must last six weeks or consist of at least 50 class hours; in addition, students must submit some graded written work done for the course.

Zulu

Four terms of AAAS 90r (conducted in Zulu), beyond the first year of language study. Two courses must be at the third-year level or beyond.

Other advanced Zulu courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit or AAAS 91r (if conducted in Zulu) may be substituted for these courses with permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Department of African and African American Studies. In the case of summer study, the course must last six weeks or consist of at least 50 class hours; in addition, students must submit some graded written work done for the course.

Advanced Standing

Beginning with the Class of 2024, the option of Advanced Standing will no longer be offered. As an alternative, students will have the opportunity to apply to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences for a master’s degree pursued concurrently with the bachelor’s degree. Full information concerning Advanced Standing is found on the website for the Office of Undergraduate Education. Questions about the program should be addressed to the Resident Dean or the Advanced Standing adviser in the Office of Undergraduate Education.

Advanced Placement

Students who are eligible for Advanced Standing using Advanced Placement Examination or International Baccalaureate scores, should be mindful that in the case of a few of the exams our faculty have determined that the material covered by the exam overlaps with content taught in a corresponding course at Harvard. The AP or IB course and Harvard course are deemed to be “equivalent” in the context of Advanced Standing, and the College will not give a student credit for both the exam and the equivalent course if the student were to activate Advanced Standing using that score. Not all AP or IB exams have equivalent courses at Harvard, but students considering Advanced Standing should be aware of this possibility and consult their placement and score records in my.harvard and the Advanced Standing section of the website for the Office of Undergraduate Education.

College Board Advanced Placement exams can be helpful indicators for level placement in certain subjects. Students are encouraged to send their scores to Harvard College through the Registrar’s Office. In most instances, students will be expected to take placement exams even in subjects in which they may have taken an AP exam. The placement exam score and AP score are often considered together in the determination of placement recommendations.

Advanced Standing

New students, excepting all those admitted as transfer students, through the Class of 2023, will be eligible for Advanced Standing if they have received credit toward Advanced Standing at Harvard by receiving qualifying scores on the College Board Advanced Placement examinations, International Baccalaureate examinations, or certain international examinations. Consult the Office of Undergraduate Education and the Advanced Standing adviser for details. A small number of Harvard departmental exams may be used in combination with AP exam scores to meet Advanced Standing criteria; consult the Office of Undergraduate Education website.

Advanced Standing is designed for students through the Class of 2023 who wish to accelerate their study and for those ready to undertake specialized work early. An eligible student who wishes to use Advanced Standing to graduate after only six or seven terms in the College or, if accepted, remain a fourth year to pursue one of several specific master’s degree programs, must activate Advanced Standing by the advertised deadline for degree applications during the third term before the student intends to complete the undergraduate requirements (consult this webpage, and Academic Calendar for details). Students may not activate Advanced Standing until they have declared a concentration.

Students eligible for Advanced Standing who are considering pursuing the AB/AM degree program may, with the permission of the Administrative Board, bracket certain courses in their second, third, or fourth year. Bracketed courses are not counted toward the bachelor’s degree, GPA calculations, or honors recommendations, but count toward the master’s degree. (Bracketed courses are so called because they appear in brackets on the transcript.) The last date for bracketing courses is the fifth Monday of the term in which the course is being taken. Petitions to retroactively bracket courses may be considered by the Administrative Board from candidates admitted for the AM or SM degree as part of the AB/AM program. If a student does not enroll in the AB/AM program, or does not complete the AB/AM program, any courses that the student may have bracketed earlier will be automatically unbracketed.

For specific information on the number of letter-graded courses and the total credit requirements for the degree required of Advanced Standing students, see Credit Requirements for the Degree.

Concurrent Master's Degree

Beginning with the Class of 2022, students will have the opportunity to apply to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences for a master’s degree pursued concurrently with the bachelor’s degree. As part of the concurrent degree program, students will be allowed to double-count up to sixteen credits for the Bachelor of Arts and either the Master of Arts or the Master of Science. An undergraduate pursuing the concurrent degree will complete both of these degrees by the end of eight terms of residency, or the equivalent. Students wishing to pursue this option may consult the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences for a list of approved programs.

Students admitted to the College prior to 2020 and who were eligible for advanced standing will be allowed to apply for and pursue the fourth-year master’s degree in accordance with the rules for advanced standing that were in place when the students matriculated. Uniquely qualified students who will be juniors in the College before the fall of 2020 and who are not eligible for advanced standing, may petition the Office of Undergraduate Education for an exception allowing them to apply to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences for a concurrent master’s degree.

Foreign Credentials

Students presenting foreign credentials (e.g., British A levels, French Baccalauréat, Swiss Maturité scores) may be eligible for Advanced Standing upon evaluation of individual credentials. Students who have earned the International Baccalaureate diploma with scores of 7 on three Higher Level examinations may also qualify. For further information, please consult the Advanced Standing adviser in the Office of Undergraduate Education.

Study at Other Boston-Area Institutions

From time to time, students with strong academic plans wish to incorporate in those plans one or more courses at a local college or university with which Harvard does not have a cross-registration agreement, while continuing to be enrolled and take courses in the College. (The Faculty of Arts and Sciences has cross-registration agreements with the other Harvard Faculties and with MIT; see Cross-Registration.) With the exception of students who may be enrolled in one of the double degree (AB/MM) programs supported by the College (between the College and New England Conservatory or between the College and Berklee College of Music), Harvard undergraduates wishing to earn Harvard degree credit during a given term, up to 8 credits that are not available at Harvard, must demonstrate that these courses will contribute to a compelling academic plan tied to their concentration. This plan must be endorsed by the student's Head Tutor or Director of Undergraduate Studies, and then the student may petition the Administrative Board by the appropriate deadline for the term in which the student wishes to include courses elsewhere in their plans of study. Harvard College students who are enrolled in Harvard's double degree (AB/MM) program with New England Conservatory or Berklee College of Music may petition the Administrative Board by the appropriate deadline in order to be allowed to take up to 8 credits in a given term at New England Conservatory or Berklee College of Music. Double degree students must demonstrate that the course will contribute to a compelling academic plan tied to their work in the double degree program and that the course is not offered at Harvard. The student's plan must be endorsed by the adviser to the double degree program in Harvard's Department of Music.

It is each student’s responsibility to gain admission to and pay for the instruction at the other institution and to present a transcript from the other institution for the work completed at the end of the term, following the usual procedures for study out of residence. Harvard tuition is reduced for these students on a per-course basis for each course taken elsewhere for Harvard degree credit, and those students eligible for financial aid may apply their aid to the costs of studying at the other institution. Provided that their combined program at Harvard and the other institution adds up to a full load, students may continue in College housing subject to the ordinary eligibility rules. All other administrative procedures and limitations on the overall amount of credit a student may earn out of residence follow the policies for full-time study out of residence (see Procedures for Earning Degree Credit for Study Abroad). For more information, students should consult their Resident Dean.

The Undergraduate Teacher Education Program

The Undergraduate Teacher Education Program (UTEP) is a four-course sequence (16 credits) that permits a student to obtain a license (or “certificate”) to teach in middle and/or secondary public schools in Massachusetts and the 40+ states with which Massachusetts has reciprocity. UTEP is not a concentration in itself but meant to complement a concentration.

Participation in the program requires approval of the UTEP admissions committee, which considers applications from students as early as the spring term in their sophomore year, or as late as the fall term in their senior year. The admissions process includes an interview and submission of an application, academic records, recommendations, a résumé, and a Plan of Study. Students should have a B– or higher cumulative grade point average when they apply, and should also have some experience working with youth (e.g., as a camp counselor, tutor, coach).

To be eligible for licensure through UTEP, students must fulfill the following requirements:

Three Perspectives Courses: One course addressing psychological perspectives on human development; one course addressing educational perspectives on schools, curricula, and teachers; and one course focused on planning curricula in the subject for which the student is seeking a license. A list of eligible courses is available in the Teacher Education Program Office, Longfellow Hall, Room 310A, Graduate School of Education, or on the UTEP website.

Field Work (pre-practicum): One term of weekly classroom observations (six hours per week; 78 hours total) in an approved public school setting.

Student Teaching (practicum): 360 hours of supervised student teaching. This experience counts as one 4 credit course and must be taken at the Graduate School of Education after satisfying the pre-practicum fieldwork requirements.

Subject Matter Background: All UTEP candidates must have content expertise in an academic field taught in middle or secondary schools. UTEP offers preparation to teach biology, chemistry, earth science, English, general science (middle school only), history, mathematics, physics, and political science/political philosophy (social studies).

Ideally, all UTEP courses and field work should be completed within the junior and/or senior year. Students enrolled in the Undergraduate Teacher Education Program (UTEP) may receive credit for summer courses taken in the Graduate School of Education in order to satisfy UTEP program requirements. Students may also apply for special-student status in the Harvard Graduate School of Education to complete the student teaching and curricular planning requirements in the first term after graduation. This is known as the Term-After Option. UTEP is also piloting another option for completing the program requirements. This would require students to spend a summer student teaching at the Cambridge-Harvard Summer Academy, along with relevant coursework at the Graduate School of Education. This would be followed, in the fall semester, by the practicum, teaching methods course, and the course on educational perspectives. This allows undergraduates to complete the UTEP requirements with as little disruption as possible to their college coursework.

Interested students are encouraged to inquire about the program at any time. Questions should be directed to the UTEP Director, who is responsible for advising program participants. For further information, please contact the Undergraduate Teacher Education Program Office at the Graduate School of Education, Longfellow Hall, Room 310A, 617-495-2783, or visit the UTEP website.

Harvard Teacher Fellows Program

Harvard College seniors and alumni are eligible to apply to the Harvard Teacher Fellows (HTF) program at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. HTF is a fellowship that offers a fully funded teacher licensure pathway, a year-long teaching placement, and the option to earn an Ed.M. from HGSE. Seniors apply to the program during the fall term of their senior year; admitted applicants begin coursework during the subsequent spring term by enrolling in T200: Introduction to Teaching and Learning. T200 is offered through cross-registration at HGSE and earns 4 undergraduate credits; it is a pre-requisite for the HTF program and does not count toward the Ed.M. degree. For more information visit the HTF webpage.

Human Subjects Research

Harvard University policy and federal regulations require that all research involving human subjects that meets the federal regulatory definition of human subjects research be reviewed and approved by an Institutional Review Board (IRB) before the research begins. This requirement applies to all human subjects research meeting the federal definition conducted by faculty, staff and students, on- and off-campus, regardless of funding. The IRB for Harvard University-Area researchers is the Committee on the Use of Human Subjects (CUHS).  

The purpose of the IRB is to weigh risks and benefits of participation in research and to protect the rights and welfare of the research participants. The guiding ethical principles of the IRB - respect for persons, beneficence and justice - are embodied in the "Belmont Report": Ethical Principles and Guidelines for the Protection of Human Subjects of Research. 

Applications to the IRB must be submitted through the Electronic Submission, Tracking and Reporting system (ESTR). Please consult the CUHS website or contact CUHS at 617-496-2847 or cuhs@harvard.edu to find out more information about: 

  • The types of research that require IRB review;
  • The process for submitting applications;
  • The training required for investigators and their Faculty Sponsors; 
  • Appropriate forms, templates and guidance documents;
  • And, the special process and training program for undergraduate research (http://cuhs.harvard.edu/urtp-portal).

Research and Teaching Involving Animal Subjects

Research Administration Services 

Office of the Vice Provost for Research

The use of live animals in research and teaching is a societal and individual privilege that is taken seriously at Harvard and is a highly regulated activity. University policies and local, state, and federal government regulations require advance review and approval of all vertebrate animal and cephalopod research prior to its commencement. The Faculty of Arts and Sciences’ federally mandated Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) is responsible for reviewing and approving proposed studies.

IACUC administrative services are provided by staff in the FAS Research Administration Services (RAS) office. All individuals using vertebrate animals or cephalopods in research and/or teaching must participate in the institution’s occupational health program, complete assigned training courses, and attend new researcher orientation that provides an overview of Harvard policies and applicable local, state, and federal regulations regarding the use of animals.

The Office of Animal Resources (OAR) is the unit responsible for the housing, daily care and health of vertebrate animals used on campus in the FAS. All mammals and other select vertebrates housed in OAR-managed facilities must be ordered through the OAR’s Animal Ordering system; questions regarding orders may be sent to animalorders@fas.harvard.edu.

Any concerns or questions about the care and use of laboratory animals should be directed promptly to any of the following contacts listed below. In accordance with the University’s Whistleblower Policy, the University will protect from retaliation members of the Harvard community who make good faith reports of suspected violations of law or University policy. The University’s Compliance Hotline is a resource for members of the Harvard community who are uncomfortable reporting through the recommended contacts and prefer to anonymously report any suspected violations of law or Harvard policy.

  • Craig P. Hunter, PhD, Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology, IACUC Chair: (617) 495-8309, craig_hunter@harvard.edu
  • Leslie A. Kirwan, Dean for Administration and Finance of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Institutional Official of the IACUC: (617) 496-8729, leslie_kirwan@harvard.edu
  • Kathleen Pritchett-Corning, DVM, Attending Veterinarian and Interim Director of the Office of Animal Resources: (617) 384-6642, pritchettcorning@fas.harvard.edu
  • Denise M. Moody, Senior Director of Research Compliance: (617) 496-3090, denisemoody@fas.harvard.edu
  • IACUC administrative office: iacuc@fas.harvard.edu
  • Compliance Hotline: 877-694-2275 FREE

Check-In Process and Course Registration

The Check-In Process

Students are required to complete the check-in process online at the opening of each term by the date designated in the academic calendar. A student who fails to complete the check-in process by the deadline is subject to disciplinary action and will incur a $50 charge. Information about the check-in process is available on the Registrar’s web site. (For additional check-in information, see the Academic Calendar and Check-In and Course Registration.)

 

 

Choice of Courses

Every student is required to select FAS courses from those listed in my.harvard, with the guidance of a first-year student adviser, sophomore adviser, or concentration adviser or tutor. (For enrollment in non-FAS courses, see Cross-Registration.) Selection should be made with a view toward satisfying concentration and General Education requirements and other degree requirements not already met. Students must qualify for each selected course according to the course’s guidelines and prerequisites stated in my.harvard or otherwise satisfy the instructor that they are properly prepared to enroll in it.

Courses in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences are numbered according to the following scheme:

  • 1–99 or 910–999: Primarily for Undergraduates
  • 100–199 or 1000–1999: For Undergraduates and Graduates
  • 200–299 or 2000–2999: Primarily for Graduates
  • 300–399 or 3000–3999: Graduate Courses of Reading and Research

Courses numbered in the 100s or 1000s or below and courses designated by capital letters ordinarily are open to all students who have met the prerequisites unless the instructor’s permission is required (indicated on my.harvard), or unless enrollment is restricted by the size of the room or by similar limitations of resources. Undergraduates may not enroll in courses numbered in the 300s or 3000s. The appropriate course level is indicated in the course record (‘for undergraduates’, ‘for undergraduates and graduates’, etc.) Exceptions are Advanced Standing students in their fourth year of residence who are candidates for the master’s degree. They may enroll in such courses with the instructor’s permission.

It is inappropriate for students to receive credit for the same work for which they are financially compensated. Thus, undergraduate course assistants may not receive academic credit in any form, including Independent Study and Supervised Reading and Research course credit, for courses with which they are assisting. Research for which students receive a grant may inform their academic work. Research performed for other financial compensation may inform academic work in subsequent semesters only, and only with the express permission of the employer, including a laboratory head.

Course Registration

Prior to registering for courses, students must meet with their first-year student adviser, sophomore adviser, or concentration adviser. After the meeting, the adviser will release the advising hold. Students officially register for courses by submitting them online at my.harvard. Registration is not complete until students have enrolled in their minimum required course load – typically 16 credits – and any required petitions for cross-registration or Independent Study have been approved (students need to submit their petitions after receiving approval to enroll in courses; the final step belongs to the student).

Course registration may be held for a variety of reasons, such as unpaid term bills, immunization, or meeting with adviser. Failure to clear the hold by the course registration deadline is not a legitimate reason for a late fee waiver. Students should visit my.harvard to see what holds may exist on their student account that may prevent them from registering for courses. Financial holds indicate that students must clear their accounts with the Student Financial Services Office before being allowed to register. A medical hold usually requires the submission of further immunization documentation to Medical Records at Harvard University Health Services. The International Office may also place a hold on the registration of a foreign student if the proper credentials have not yet been presented to that office. Holds may also be placed if a student has a disciplinary case pending before the Administrative Board, or for other reasons as indicated in my.harvard. Students should contact the appropriate office and make arrangements to clear the hold.

Course registration deadlines appear in the Academic Calendar. A student who fails to register for courses on time with the minimum required course load (typically 16 credits) will incur a charge of $40 per week until they are fully enrolled. Students who fail to register for a minimum required course load are subject to disciplinary action and may be placed on an involuntary leave of absence. Ordinarily, no students, including those who have not been able to clear holds for financial reasons, will be allowed to register for courses after the second Friday following the course registration deadline. Students enrolling after the course registration deadline will need to follow the “add” process, meaning that the permission of each instructor is required. After the fifth Monday of the term, the Administrative Board's approval is also required. The deadline to change the grading basis of a course to Pass/Fail or back to Letter Grade is the fifth Monday of the term.

It is the responsibility of students to confirm their course enrollment for that term. A student is considered registered only for those courses listed in My Classes on my.harvard for the current term. A student may not sign any other person’s name or initials, or falsify in any way, a Plan of Study, change-of-course petition, registration form, or any other official form or petition, hard copy or electronic. Violation of this rule makes the student subject to disciplinary action, including requirement to withdraw.

Course Credit Without Letter Grades

Freshman Seminars (Graded SAT/UNS)

Courses Taken by Cross-Registration

Courses Graded Pass/Fail

Courses Graded SAT/UNS

Independent Study (Graded Pass/Fail)

Students enrolling in courses without letter grades are reminded of the following requirements:

  • Each term students must take for credit at least one letter-graded course offered by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Courses taken in the Graduate School of Education under the UTEP Program constitute an exception to this rule.
  • Of the 128 credits students must pass to receive the degree, at least 84 credits (96 credits for a degree with honors) must be letter-graded C– or higher and be given by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. The only non-letter grade that may be counted towards the requirement of 84 satisfactory letter-graded credits is Satisfactory (SAT). Please see the section below on Courses Graded SAT/UNS for an explanation of which SAT courses may be considered. 
  • No more than one of the four required General Education courses (Aesthetics & Culture, Ethics & Civics, Histories, Societies, Individuals, and Science & Technology in Society) may be taken pass/fail.
  • Writing, foreign language, and certain concentration requirements can only be satisfied by letter-graded courses.
  • Ordinarily, no first-year student or sophomore may take fewer than three letter-graded courses (4 credits per course) in any term.

Transfer, term-time study abroad, and Advanced Standing students should see Credit Requirements for the Degree and other previous sections referring to them.

Freshman Seminars (Graded SAT/UNS)

First-year students admitted to Freshman Seminars may earn non-letter-grade credit up to a maximum of 2 courses (4 credits per course). First-year students may not ordinarily enroll in both a Freshman Seminar and another non-letter-graded course in any one term (with the exception of COMPSCI 50 and a Freshman Seminar). A Satisfactory (SAT) grade in a Freshman Seminar may not be counted towards the requirement of 84 satisfactory letter-graded credits unless the Seminar fulfills a concentration requirement.

Courses Taken by Cross-Registration

Courses taken either by cross-registration or out of residence for degree credit will not be counted toward the letter-graded credit requirement and will not factor into the grade point average (GPA) unless they are applied toward concentration requirements or the requirements for the Undergraduate Teacher Education Program (UTEP). (See Cross-Registration

Courses Graded Pass/Fail

Any undergraduate may, with the permission of the instructor, enroll in a course on a Pass/Fail basis. There is no limit on the number of courses a student may take Pass/Fail as long as the student satisfies the requirements for letter-graded courses as outlined above. To enroll in a course on this basis, a student must submit a Pass/Fail form to the Registrar’s Office and obtain the signature of the course instructor by the deadline indicated on the form. Refer to the Registrar's website for more information. No course may be added Pass/Fail nor may the grading status of a course be changed after the fifth Monday of the term. 

Courses Graded SAT/UNS

Some courses, most notably tutorial courses (see Non-Letter Grades) and Freshman Seminars, are graded SAT/UNS. In addition, House Seminars may be graded SAT/UNS at the option of the course instructor and with the approval of the Committee on Freshman Seminars. When so graded, House Seminars will not count toward the 84 satisfactory letter-graded credit requirement. A Freshman Seminar will not count towards the 84 satisfactory letter-graded credit requirement unless it is being used to fulfill a concentration requirement. Only one year-long (8 credit) senior tutorial course graded Satisfactory (SAT) may be counted towards the requirement of 84 satisfactory letter-graded credits.

Independent Study (Graded Pass/Fail)

Independent Study is designed to provide credit for field research, academic study not available in regular course work, or practice or performance in the arts. It is not suitable for group instruction, paid work, or activities outside the competence or concern of one of Harvard’s departments.

For example, studying the financial accounting system of a business firm might be an appropriate project, but working in an accounting office to gain business experience would not by itself merit academic credit. Investigating child development through observation in a day care center could qualify, but simply tutoring a child would not. Analyzing the organization of a political group might be a suitable subject, whereas organizing a political campaign would not alone suffice. In each case what distinguishes the suitable project is the application of analytical skills to the object of the Independent Study, not the intrinsic worthiness or instructiveness of the experience itself.

Any sophomore, junior, or senior whose previous record is satisfactory may petition to undertake Independent Study for non-letter-graded credit. A student may petition to take up to a total of 16 credits of Independent Study. Independent Study courses are subject to the same rules for dropping and withdrawing as any other course.

A petition to undertake Independent Study, available on the Office of Undergraduate Education website, requires two signatures:

  1. That of a qualified adviser (ordinarily a voting member of a Harvard Faculty) who must be an officer of the University, and whose professional competence is appropriate for the subject area of the Independent Study. In those exceptional cases where the adviser is not a Faculty member—for example, a teaching fellow—the petition must also be supported by an appropriate academic department or unit.
  2. That of the Resident Dean which signifies that the proposal satisfies the guidelines and has been signed by the adviser.

The petition also requires an outline of the student’s proposed project. It must be submitted to the Resident Dean for approval, ordinarily in the first week of the term. In addition, the Resident Dean must approve the course. A separate petition, properly completed, must be filed for each Independent Study course.

The adviser will assist the student in the development of a plan for Independent Study and provide guidance but not regular instruction. Independent Study does not imply regular formal instruction and should not be confused with tutorials or House Seminars or Supervised Reading and Research courses offered by several academic departments and committees. A student enrolled in Independent Study must undertake to work independently. Classroom work, regular instruction, and group projects are inadmissible. Students whose projects include interviews or research involving human subjects should contact the Harvard Committee on the Use of Human Subjects (Institutional Review Board).

The adviser will submit a midterm progress report based on a preliminary written report by the student of the student's activities. By the fourth day of Reading Period, the student must submit to the adviser an analytical paper concerning the term’s work. A simple description or report of the term’s activities is not by itself adequate. In the case of artistic practice or performance, evidence of substantial accomplishment should be supplied in lieu of written work.

The granting of credit will be determined by the adviser. In those cases where the adviser is not a voting member of a Harvard Faculty, the Chair or Head Tutor/Director of Undergraduate Studies of the concentration, or equivalent officer with voting membership in a Harvard Faculty, must review and approve the petition and the grade assigned by the adviser. Independent Study is graded “Pass” or “Fail.” The adviser will submit a copy of the student’s paper and a brief statement about the student's work for inclusion in the student’s folder in the Resident Dean’s office, ordinarily by the first day of the Examination Period.

Independent Study is not counted toward General Education requirements and is not normally counted toward concentration or secondary field requirements.

First-year students may not enroll in Independent Study. They may, however, seek special permission from their Resident Dean to enroll in one Supervised Reading and Research course within the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (91r- and 910r-level course category) if an appropriate member of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences has indicated a willingness to supervise.

 

Simultaneous Enrollment

The Faculty believes that full participation in a classroom setting is essential. Therefore, a student may not enroll in courses that meet at the same time or overlapping times. It is the student's responsibility to ensure that there is no overlap in the meeting times of their courses. Exceptions to this rule may be granted only by the Administrative Board and will be considered only if the instructors in both overlapping courses agree and only in one or more of the following circumstances:

  1. When the head of the course where class time is being missed and the person(s) providing the instruction during the regular class meeting agree to provide hour-for-hour direct and personal compensatory instruction. Availability during regular office hours or time with a different person does not satisfy the requirement for direct and personal contact.
  2. When instruction in one of the courses is available on videotape, provided that (1) the course head agrees that the videotapes may be used for this purpose; (2) the lectures that are videotaped ordinarily do not provide opportunities for classroom discussion; (3) the videotapes will be available in a timely fashion so that they can be viewed before the next class period; (4) the student will miss attending part or all of no more than 1/3 of the instructional periods in the course (not including sections or labs) [N.B. if a student will miss any part of a day’s lecture, it is as though the student will miss all of it]; and (5) the instructor in the course in which the lectures are videotaped agrees to offer any hour examinations or other in-class exercises at a time that will not preclude the student from attending the second course. In those courses that do not use the blackboard or other visual aids, course-provided audiotapes may be substituted for videotapes.
  3. When a senior can meet degree requirements only by taking the two particular courses in question and will have no other opportunity to enroll in the courses before graduation. In such circumstances, the Administrative Board may approve reasonable accommodations in consultation with the instructors of the courses involved.

Students who wish to petition the Administrative Board for simultaneous enrollment should work directly with their Resident Dean.

Cross-Registration

Regulations

Concentration Credit

Grading

ROTC

Students who wish to enroll in courses offered by Harvard’s professional schools or MIT may do so at my.harvard.edu and should visit the Registrar's website for instructions. In addition to submitting an online petition, first-year students are also required to send a statement of interest by email to their Resident Dean. The statement should explain why the student wants to cross-register, how the course fits into the student's curricular plans, and why no other courses within the Faculty of Arts and Sciences will meet those needs. 

In order to cross-register, a student’s immediately previous academic record ordinarily must be satisfactory. Exceptions must be approved by the Resident Dean (see Harvard Summer School for information on registration in the Harvard Summer School).

Under special conditions it may be possible for a student to earn degree credit for courses taken at another local institution provided that those courses contribute to a compelling academic plan tied to the student's concentration; see Study at Other Boston-Area Institutions.

Regulations

Harvard College students cross-registered in courses at other Harvard faculties may count up to eight credits toward the 128 minimum number of credits required for the Bachelor of Arts or Science degree. This arrangement excludes cross-registration with MIT, which is allowed without limitation on the number of credits.

Courses taken through cross-registration will not meet the College’s Divisional distribution requirement.

Exceptions to the 8 credit maximum will be allowed only if the student’s concentration will accept the credits for concentration credit. Each additional course must be approved by the student’s Head Tutor or Director of Undergraduate Studies.

All undergraduate regulations, including those regarding the deadlines for dropping and withdrawing, makeups, and extensions of time apply to cross-registration courses, even though other faculties may use a different calendar. These regulations also apply to undergraduates cross-registered in courses that may be applicable to graduate degree requirements. Harvard College students are expected to follow the deadlines and procedures of both the College and the other faculty or university. When two deadlines conflict, the earlier one applies.

Students must complete all course work by the last day of FAS examinations unless they receive approval from the Administrative Board for an extension of time (see Extensions of Time for Written or Laboratory Work). Students must bring examination conflicts caused by cross-registration to the attention of the appropriate registrars as soon as possible. Students requesting a makeup examination in a cross-registration course must report this to their Resident Dean, as usual, and must also petition the Registrar of the Faculty offering the course to arrange the makeup, which, if approved, will be given under the rules of that Faculty.

To meet graduation deadlines, second-term seniors should notify the instructor that grades for degree candidates must be received by the FAS Registrar at least ten days prior to Commencement. Harvard College students cannot graduate if grades are missing.

Students may not cross-register into January term courses nor may they receive credit for January term courses.

Concentration Credit

Students who want to petition to receive concentration credit for a course taken through cross-registration should fill out this form and contact their undergraduate program administrator to complete the petition process no later than the fifth Monday of the term in which the course is taken. Students who have not yet declared a concentration may petition for credit retroactively no later than the fifth Monday of the fourth term in residence. Contact your program administrator for more information.

Grading

When cross-registration courses taken by undergraduates are evaluated in terms not equivalent to grades used by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, the FAS Registrar will translate these evaluations into “Credit” or “No Credit,” as appropriate. Since “Incomplete” cannot be accepted as a grade for an undergraduate, such grades will be converted to “No Credit” (a failing grade) unless an extension of time is voted by the Administrative Board. Students may take cross-registered courses for a letter grade or Pass/Fail unless a specific grading option is required for the course.

Passing grades received for courses taken through cross-registration will not be used in computing a student’s grade point average except when the courses are counted toward concentration requirements or taken in the Graduate School of Education as part of UTEP (see Grade Point Averages for Undergraduates). Courses taken by cross-registration that are not counted toward concentration or UTEP requirements will normally be equated to FAS courses for the purpose of calculating rate of work (see Rate of Work) but will not be counted toward the letter-graded credit requirement or any honors degree requirements. A failing grade or the equivalent earned in a cross-registered course will be included in honors degree calculations and grade point average. Harvard will not count toward the undergraduate degree any courses that have been credited toward other degrees already conferred. Students may earn degree credit for cross-registration up to 8 credits (unless it is approved to count towards your concentration; such courses do not count against the 8 credit limit for cross-registration). Courses taken for cross-registration beyond the 8 credit limit will appear on your Harvard College transcript with a grade but with zero credit earned.

ROTC

ROTC courses may be taken by cross-registration at MIT. First-year students may cross-register in ROTC courses, but must follow the petition process established above for first-year students. Students may earn up to eight Harvard credits through ROTC cross-registration at MIT towards the Harvard degree. These courses will count towards the overall credits required to graduate, but they will not factor into the GPA or satisfy concentration requirements. In order to be transferrable to Harvard, the MIT ROTC courses in Naval Science, Military Science, and Aerospace Studies must earn at least six MIT units. Students should be aware that there may be certain academic requirements for eligibility in receiving ROTC scholarship aid.

Change of Course

Courses may be added or dropped at my.harvard. Withdrawal petitions are available on the Registrar’s web site at https://registrar.fas.harvard.edu.   

It is the student’s responsibility to review the course report carefully, and to perform the appropriate edit/drop/swap function at my.harvard by the fifth Monday of the term. Corrections (as opposed to changes) to student records made after the established deadlines of the fifth or seventh Monday of the term must be approved by the Administrative Board and will incur a charge of $25 in addition to the charge of $10 for correction of student errors made on my.harvard. The student can confirm the recording of drop/add petitions by checking My Courses on my.harvard. Receiving permission to enroll in a course is not the final step. The last step in this process belongs to the student. After permission is granted, the student must enroll in the course by submitting the add petition on my.harvard.

Dropping/Adding Courses

Students may add a course until the fifth Monday of the term with the permission of the instructor. Students may drop a course from their record only until the fifth Monday of the term. Special enrollment dates are used for module courses (typically half-semester in length); consult the academic calendar of the school offering such courses.

Students are not charged for any adding or dropping by the third Monday of the term. All students pay a $10 fee for adding or dropping courses after the third Monday until the fifth Monday deadline.

Withdrawing from Courses without Credit

A student may petition to withdraw from a course by the seventh Monday of a term. When a petition to withdraw from a course has been approved, the student’s record will carry the notation WD for the course. The transcript states: “WD indicates permission to withdraw from the course without completing requirements and credit for the course.” All students pay a $10 fee for withdrawal petitions filed by the seventh Monday of the term.

A student who does not receive permission to drop or withdraw from a course by the fifth or seventh Monday, respectively, and who is absent from a regularly scheduled final examination, during the Final Examination and Project Period, will receive a grade of ABS (Absent) in the course. An unexcused ABS is equivalent in all respects to a failing grade.

Changing Letter-Graded or Pass/Fail Status of Courses

A course may be changed from letter-graded to Pass/Fail (with the instructor’s approval), or changed from Pass/Fail to letter-graded until the fifth Monday of the term. After that day, no changes in the grading status of any course can be made. There is no fee for changing the grading status in a course. (See Cross-Registration and Year-long Courses.)

Year-Long Courses

Year-long Courses

A small number of course offerings in FAS are year-long, which means that they extend from September to May and ordinarily count for eight credits. Year-long courses, such as certain senior tutorials and first-year language courses, are considered indivisible, which means a student must successfully complete the entire year-long course in order to earn credit and they ordinarily may not be divided midyear with credit.

Year-long Courses

Students who enroll in the fall term for a year-long course will be auto-enrolled for the second part of the course in the spring and may not drop the course after the fifth Monday of the fall term. Students will be granted a midyear grade for the course at the end of the fall term with a notation that it is a midyear grade.  Upon completion of the spring term the fall grade will be replaced on the transcript with the spring grade and that grade will be used to calculate the GPA.

Year-long courses are subject to the drop deadline of the fall term and the withdrawal deadline of the spring term.

Suspending Credit

Should a student need to leave a year-long course at the end of one term and plan to complete the second half at a later date they may, with the permission of the instructor, suspend the first half until the course is completed. The deadline for filing a petition to suspend is the seventh Monday of the subsequent term. A student may take the second half of the course at a later time and the suspended grade for the fall will be replaced by the spring term grade of the second half of the course. In some cases when the faculty member of either iteration of the course deems it appropriate, the student may be required to divide the course with credit as opposed to suspending it.

Any suspended course that has not been completed or divided for credit by the seventh Monday of the student’s final term in residence will automatically be converted to Withdraw by the Registrar.

Dividing with Credit at Midyear

Students may only divide a year-long course with half (ordinarily 4 credits) credit with the written consent of the instructor and the approval of the Registrar.  Students should consult the Registrar’s Office for additional information about this option. No student shall be allowed to divide with credit after the fifth Monday of the spring term.

Leaving a Year-Long Course at Midyear Because of Absence from the College

When a student who is enrolled in a year-long course leaves the College at midyear, the Registrar automatically suspends the course if the student has earned a passing midyear grade. If the student has a failing midyear grade, the student will be withdrawn from the course; however, the failing grade makes the student’s record for that term unsatisfactory, and the student will be subject to academic review by the Administrative Board. Upon return to the College, the student may change an automatic suspend to a withdrawal.

Changing Letter-Graded or Pass/Fail Status

The fall term grading status of a year-long course may be changed up to the fifth Monday of the fall term. A student who is enrolled in a year-long course during the fall term may change the grading status of that course for the spring term by filing an appropriate change-of-grade petition by the fifth Monday of the spring term. Pass/Fail grading status always requires the instructor’s permission. When the grading status of a year-long course is different for the fall and spring terms, the midyear grade will appear on the transcript as a fall term (4 credit) grade.

Repeating Courses

Students who wish to repeat a course for which they have received a passing grade may do so. The second iteration of the course and its grade will appear on the transcript showing zero credit and will not count in any way toward degree requirements, determination of honors, or grade point average. Occasionally, two courses with different numbers will present material that overlaps in content to a significant degree, and in such instances the rules for repeating a course will pertain if a student wishes to take both courses. Courses that are determined to overlap to a significant degree are identified by the department(s) offering them and are so noted in my.harvard.

Students are normally allowed to repeat failed courses for both grade and credit. Note, however, that the failing grade received when the course was taken the first time remains a permanent part of the College record, and both remain factored into the grade point average.

Courses designated with an “r” (such as 91r) in my.harvard may be repeated for credit without petition.

Rate of Work

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences typically awards 4 credits to a semester-long course and does not assign extra credit granted for courses with laboratory work. The normal rate of work is 16 credits per term, at least 4 credits of which must be taken for degree credit and a letter grade and offered by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Courses taken in the Graduate School of Education under UTEP may be substituted for a letter-graded course in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.

Ordinarily, students may take 20 credits each term (5 courses, 4 credits per course). Students wishing to take more than 20 credits in a term must obtain the approval of their Resident Dean. First-year students who wish to take more than 16 credits (4 courses, 4 credits per course) in their first term must obtain the approval of their Resident Dean. Students may not enroll in more than 24 credits (6 courses, 4 credits per course) in one term without Administrative Board approval.

Ordinarily, no student may work at a rate less than necessary to maintain a yearly average rate of 32 credits passed (i.e., by the end of the first year, at least 32 credits completed; by the end of sophomore year, at least 64 credits completed; and by the end of junior year, at least 96 credits completed). By taking extra courses, students may accumulate credit that may be used to reduce their rate of work in a subsequent term or terms, provided that the overall average rate of 32 credits per year is maintained. First-year students who wish to complete fewer than 16 credits per term must obtain the approval of their Resident Dean. Students who do not proceed toward the degree at a satisfactory rate are subject to Administrative Board action, including denial of permission to register for subsequent terms.

Tuition Charges

Tuition adjustment for those permitted to work at less than the normal rate will be determined on a case-by-case basis by the Administrative Board. No remission of tuition is allowed when a student has been excluded from a course (see The Grading System and Exclusion from a Course).

Visiting Undergraduate Students will be charged at a per-course rate.  Courses dropped or withdrawn will be charged on a pro-rated term following the tuition refund schedule for students withdrawing from the University.

Residence Requirement

No student will be recommended for the AB or SB degree without having completed at least as many terms in residence at Harvard as would have been required had the student worked continuously at a sixteen credit (4 courses per term, 4 credits per course) rate. A student who has completed degree requirements in fewer terms than would have been required had the student worked continuously at the sixteen credit rate may petition the Resident Dean for waiver of the residence requirement (see Acceleration).

 

Additional Term

In exceptional cases, and only to meet specific degree requirements for the AB degree, students may petition the Administrative Board for permission to remain in the College for one term beyond the end of the second term of their senior year. Students undertaking the SB degree who require additional time in the College in order to meet the requirements of that degree must petition the Engineering Undergraduate Committee by the appropriate deadline. Tuition for an additional term is charged at a per course rate. Ordinarily, students in an additional term are not eligible for College housing or financial aid. Before petitioning the Administrative Board or the Engineering Undergraduate Committee for an additional term, students should consult with their Resident Dean about their proposed academic program, tuition and fees, and eligibility for College housing and financial aid. The Board or the Committee will weigh the academic record and performance in the community when considering these petitions. Under no circumstances will the Board grant a student permission for more than one additional term. 

Extra Transfer Term

The system by which intercollegiate transfer students receive credit for work done at their previous colleges may underestimate the amount of time a student needs at Harvard to complete a sound and appropriate program for the degree. Therefore, to meet specific degree requirements, transfer students may petition the Administrative Board for an “extra transfer term” in addition to the allotted number of terms they were granted on admission. Transfer students are eligible for only one extra transfer term.

Students granted an extra transfer term:

  • enroll and pay at the sixteen credit (4 courses per term, 4 credits per course) rate;
  • must fulfill an additional General Education requirement with the exception that junior transfers who remain for a fifth term do not need to take a fifth General Education course;
  • are entitled to housing in the College, provided they have not already lived in College housing for six terms, in which case they may apply for housing on a space-available basis; and,
  • may apply for financial aid to help defray the costs of the extra transfer term.

If transfer students need no more than two additional courses to complete their academic programs, they may petition for an additional term. Students may petition for an additional term following an extra transfer term (above), or without having completed an extra transfer term. Since these students do not enroll in more than two courses, they do not incur an additional General Education requirement. They are, however, subject to all the usual “additional term” provisions.

Harvard Summer School

Degree credit will be granted only for summer school courses offered by the Harvard Summer School, except that under special circumstances credit for course work done at other institutions may be awarded provided that advance approval has been obtained (see Procedures for Earning Degree Credit for Study Abroad). Students enrolled in the Undergraduate Teacher Education Program (UTEP) may receive credit for summer courses taken in the Graduate School of Education in order to satisfy UTEP program requirements. Harvard undergraduates may not earn credit for courses taken through the Division of Continuing Education's Extension School.

All numbered or lettered courses announced in the Harvard Summer School catalog count as work done in residence if taken prior to graduation under the “credit” category, unless stated otherwise in the Harvard Summer School catalog (see the section "Harvard College Student Guidelines" in that catalog). These courses and grades are always entered on the student’s College record and counted accordingly, provided one or more of the courses taken can fulfill degree requirements. Note the following exceptions:

  • Courses taken before matriculation as a degree candidate in Harvard College will be added to the College record only by vote of the Administrative Board; such a vote is final and the Board will not subsequently approve a petition to remove such courses from a student’s College record. Students should ordinarily petition for such credit during their first year. Note: Petitions granted by the Administrative Board after the deadline for the student’s degree application will postpone the student’s degree until the next date on which degrees are voted by the Faculty.
  • Courses taken after the last term in residence will not be added to the College record unless one or more are necessary to meet degree requirements.
  • Students may not receive credit toward a degree for a Summer School course that is essentially the same course as one taken previously for credit, either in Summer School or during the academic year, whether or not the two course numbers or titles are identical.
  • Note that Harvard College students may not count online Summer School courses toward their Harvard College degrees.

Students cannot be relieved from academic probation on the basis of Summer School work, but courses taken in Summer School are subject to academic review by the College.

The minimum Harvard Summer School program is 4 credits and the regular Harvard Summer School program is 8 credits. Only with the prior permission of the Resident Dean may any undergraduate enroll in 12 credits in Summer School. The Resident Dean who grants this permission submits the approval directly to the Summer School.

New first-year students, admitted for September, are strongly urged to consult with their Resident Dean about the content of their summer programs. New transfer students are likewise urged to consult with the Transfer Student Adviser.

The Summer School does not attempt to provide courses that Harvard College students might be required to take in order to meet degree requirements. For example, courses to meet particular concentration or General Education requirements may not be offered by the Summer School.

Students who plan to complete degree requirements (including “lost degree” candidates) in the Summer School are required to so notify the Registrar of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at graduation@fas.harvard.edu. These students are reminded to be certain that the courses in which they are enrolling do, in fact, complete their remaining degree requirements.

No student may enroll in Independent Study during the summer, but students may petition to enroll in Supervised Reading and Research courses or tutorial courses (90- and 900-level courses) in the Harvard Summer School. These courses require a special enrollment form, obtainable in the Summer School Office, which must be signed by the Head Tutor or Director of Undergraduate Studies (or equivalent officer) in the field, by the instructor who is to supervise the course, and by the Registrar of the Summer School. The usual Summer School course fee is charged for all courses taken in the summer, and the work in the course must be completed before the end of the Summer School Examination Period.

Non-Completion and equivalent grades received in Summer School courses will be converted to “No Credit” (NCR), a failing grade, unless an extension has been granted by the Administrative Board of the Harvard Summer School.

Students who register for Harvard Summer School who are on leave of absence or who have been required to withdraw from Harvard College for any reason must submit to the Summer School a Resident Dean Approval Form signed by their Resident Dean. No student who for disciplinary reasons has been required to withdraw for the second and final time, dismissed, or expelled from Harvard College may ordinarily enroll in the Harvard Summer School.

Any violation of Harvard Summer School academic and disciplinary policy is subject to review and disciplinary action by the Summer School Administrative Board and in addition may trigger action by the Harvard College Administrative Board or Harvard College Honor Council as appropriate.

Grades and Honors

The Grading System

Letter Grades

Non-Letter Grades

The Grading System

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences uses the following system of letter and non-letter grades to evaluate undergraduate student work:

Letter Grades

A, A–   Earned by work whose excellent quality indicates a full mastery of the subject and, in the case of the grade of A, is of extraordinary distinction.

B+, B, B–  Earned by work that indicates a good comprehension of the course material, a good command of the skills needed to work with the course material, and the student’s full engagement with the course requirements and activities.

C+, C, C–  Earned by work that indicates an adequate and satisfactory comprehension of the course material and the skills needed to work with the course material and that indicates the student has met the basic requirements for completing assigned work and participating in class activities.

D+, D, D–  Earned by work that is unsatisfactory but that indicates some minimal command of the course materials and some minimal participation in class activities that is worthy of course credit toward the degree.

E  Earned by work which is unsatisfactory and unworthy of course credit towards the degree.

Non-Letter Grades

ABS  Students who miss a regularly scheduled midyear or final examination are given a failing grade of Absent (ABS), which will be changed only if the student is granted and takes a makeup examination. Unexcused absences are counted as failures (see Final Examinations).

CR/NCR  CR/NCR is used only for certain cross-registration courses. The grade of Credit represents letter grades from A to D–; the grade of No Credit represents the letter grade of E.

EXLD  A notation of Excluded (EXLD) indicates that the student was not permitted to continue in the course by vote of the Administrative Board or Honor Council, and received no credit. Exclusion from a course is equivalent in all respects to failing it and in and of itself makes the student’s record for the term unsatisfactory.

EXT  Instructors may allow students extensions of time to complete course work up to the last day of the Examination Period. After that date, only the Administrative Board may grant extensions of time for undergraduates to complete course work. Until the date of extension, the student is given a grade of Extension (EXT). EXT is only a temporary notation; a final grade must be given if the Administrative Board does not grant additional time or, if additional time is granted, upon the expiration of the extension (see Extension of Time for Written or Laboratory Work). 

PA/FL   The grade of Pass represents letter grades of A to D–; the grade of Fail represents the letter grade of E. Certain courses may, with the instructors’ permission, be taken on a Pass/Fail basis. Independent Study is always graded PA/FL.

SAT/UNS   The grade of Satisfactory includes letter grades from A to C–; the grade of Unsatisfactory represents work below C– and is considered a failing grade. No students enrolled in courses graded SAT/UNS may receive letter grades in those courses. The following junior and senior tutorials must be graded SAT/UNS:

African and African American Studies 99a and 99b
Applied Mathematics 99r
Chemistry 91r, 98r, and 99r
Comparative Literature 98a, 98b, 99a, and 99b
English 99r
Folklore and Mythology 99a and 99b
French 99a and 99b
German 99a and 99b
Government 99r
History 99a and 99b
History & Literature 99a and 99b
History of Art and Architecture 99
History of Science 99a, 99b
Italian 99a and 99b
Latin American Studies 99
Linguistics 99a and 99b
Literature 98a, 98b, 99a, and 99b
Mathematics 60r
Portuguese 99a and 99b
Psychology 985, 990a, 990b, 992a, 992b, 993a, and 993b
Religion 99a and 99b
Romance Studies 99a and 99b
Scandinavian 99a and 99b
Slavic 99a and 99b
Social Studies 99a and 99b
Sociology 99a and 99b
South Asian Studies 99
Spanish 99a and 99b
Special Concentrations 99a and 99b
Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology 99a and 99b
Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality 99a and 99b

Freshman seminars are always graded SAT/UNS. House Seminars may be graded SAT/UNS at the option of the course instructor and with the approval of the Committee on Freshman Seminars.

Approximately six business days after the end of the final examination period, students can view their final and midyear grades at my.harvard. However, students who complete online evaluations for all courses in which they were enrolled for the term will be provided early online access to their final course grades.

A student may request that the instructor review a grade that has been received and may also ask to consult with the chair of the department or committee of instruction offering the course. However, final authority for the assignment of grades rests with the instructor in charge of the course. Once a grade has been reported to the Registrar, it can be changed only upon the written request of the instructor to the Registrar, acting on behalf of the Dean of Harvard College (or the Dean of the Graduate School in the case of 200- or 300-level courses). The Registrar must be satisfied that all students in the course will have been treated equitably before authorizing any grade change.

Grades of C– or higher, as well as the grades of CR, PA, and SAT, are passing and satisfactory grades. Grades of D+ through D– are passing but unsatisfactory grades. Grades of E, ABS (Absent), NCR (No Credit), FL (Fail), UNS (Unsatisfactory), and EXLD (Excluded) are failing grades.

The grade of INCOMPLETE (INC) cannot under any circumstances be given to undergraduates.

Grade Point Averages for Undergraduates

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences averages its letter grades with a 4-point scale: A = 4.00, A– = 3.67, B+ = 3.33, B = 3.00, B– = 2.67, C+ = 2.33, C = 2.00, C– = 1.67, D+ = 1.33, D = 1.00, D– = 0.67. E, ABS, NCR, FL, UNS, EXLD = 0. The grade point average is the numerical average of all grades received in letter-graded courses taken under the Faculty of Arts and Sciences for degree credit. In addition, the grade point average includes all failed courses (including failing and unsatisfactory grades in courses taken Pass/Fail and SAT/UNS), courses taken for credit in the Harvard Summer School, and cross-registration courses as appropriate. Passing grades received for courses taken through cross-registration will not be used in computing a student’s grade point average except when the courses are counted toward concentration requirements or taken in the Graduate School of Education as part of UTEP (see Cross-Registration). Grades received for course work done out of residence will not be used in computing the grade point average. Grade point averages are calculated on both a cumulative, semesterly, and annual basis. Students of the sophomore, junior, and senior classes in the top 5 percent of their respective classes will be designated John Harvard Scholars, based on the grade point average of the previous academic year (for those enrolled in both semesters the prior year). Students of the sophomore, junior and senior classes in the top 10% of their respective classes who are not designated John Harvard Scholars will be designated Harvard College Scholars.

Promotion

A student will ordinarily be promoted at the end of any term upon the basis of the number of terms completed or for which credit has been given, as follows:

For sophomore standing 2 terms completed
For junior standing 4 terms completed
For senior standing 6 terms completed

Requirements for Honors Degrees

Summa Cum Laude in a Field

Magna Cum Laude in a Field

Cum Laude in a Field

Cum Laude for the overall record

All degree candidates must satisfy the requirements of an approved field of concentration and meet all other degree requirements. There are two types of honors in the College: English honors (or departmental honors) are determined by the department, committee, school, or program that oversees the relevant concentration and are based solely on work done in the concentration; Latin honors (or College honors) are based on the entirety of the student record, and recommendations for Latin honors are made to the Governing Boards of the University by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences recommends bachelor degrees for presentation to the Governing Boards of the University as follows: regular degree; cum laude on the basis of the student’s overall record; cum laude in a field; magna cum laude in a field; magna cum laude with Highest Honors in a field; or summa cum laude in a field. Faculty and concentration standards for honors may change without notice; both sets of standards must be met.

All candidates for degrees with honors must have satisfactory letter grades (C– or higher) in a minimum of 96 letter-graded credits (prorated appropriately for students graduating with fewer than 128 credits passed at Harvard). Grade point averages are based on all completed letter-graded courses taken while at Harvard including all failed courses, courses taken for credit in Harvard Summer School, and by cross-registration only as appropriate (see Grade Point Averages).

The relevant concentration will determine the level of English honors, if any, for an undergraduate who completes the requirements for honors eligibility in that field. If departmental honors are awarded, the student may then be recommended to the College for a determination of Latin honors. Thus, the awarding of departmental honors for work in a concentration is a precondition for the recommendation by the College of Latin honors in a field. It is possible that a student who has completed the relevant requirements for honors in a concentration will have the student's record judged unworthy of honors in the field but still worthy of a degree; such a student may then be recommended by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences for a regular degree, subject to the general regulations, or, if qualified, for the degree cum laude. When applicable, both English honors and Latin honors are noted on the official transcript. Only Latin honors are designated on the diploma.

 

The Faculty will award degrees with honors based on the criteria below:

Summa Cum Laude in a Field

For the degree summa cum laude the Faculty of Arts and Sciences will consider records of only those students who are designated by their concentration to receive Highest Honors in a field. The determination of Highest Honors is a serious matter requiring the collective consideration of the faculty affiliated with the concentration. In reaching this decision the faculty may choose to evaluate not only the candidate’s grades in concentration courses, but also the level and rigor of those courses, and other indicators of the candidate’s mastery of the field, such as performance on a thesis or comparable piece of independent work and/or on a written or oral general examination.

The degree summa cum laude is given to the top 5 percent of the graduating class, drawn from those designated for Highest Honors. The standards of each May will be applied at subsequent degree meetings until the following May.

Magna Cum Laude in a Field

A candidate may be recommended by the Faculty for the degree magna cum laude in a concentration or joint concentration provided the student has been designated by the concentration to receive High Honors or Highest Honors. For May degrees, the total number of degrees summa cum laude and magna cum laude combined will be no more than 20 percent of all May degree candidates. The Faculty will recommend for magna cum laude those students with the highest grade point averages who have not already been recommended for the degree summa cum laude. Candidates in this category who received Highest Honors from their concentration but were not awarded summa cum laude will be recommended for the degree magna cum laude with Highest Honors in a Field. The minimum grade point average that is awarded a degree magna cum laude each May will constitute the standard to be applied for that degree at subsequent degree meetings until the following May.

Cum Laude in a Field

A candidate may be recommended by the Faculty for the degree cum laude in a concentration or joint concentration provided the student has been designated by the concentration to receive Honors, High Honors, or Highest Honors. For May degrees, the total number of degrees summa cum laude, magna cum laude and cum laude in field sum to 50 percent of all May degree candidates. The Faculty will recommend for cum laude in field those students with the highest grade point averages who have not already been awarded the degree summa cum laude or magna cum laude. The minimum grade point average that is awarded a degree cum laude in field each May will constitute the standard to be applied for that degree at subsequent degree meetings until the following May.

Cum Laude for the overall record

A candidate not designated to receive honors in a concentration may be recommended by the Faculty for the degree cum laude on the basis of overall grade point average alone if the student's grade point average is at or above the minimum grade point average awarded the degree magna cum laude. In any May, if the number of candidates with a sufficient grade point average exceeds 10 percent of all May degree candidates, only those with the highest grade point averages totaling 10 percent of all May degree candidates will be awarded the degree cum laude on the basis of overall grade point average alone. The minimum grade point average that is awarded a degree cum laude each May will constitute the standard to be applied for that degree at subsequent degree meetings until the following May.

Prizes

The awarding of prizes at Harvard can be traced back to Edward Hopkins, a London merchant who came to America in 1637. His bequest continues to provide prizes for “Hopeful youth in the way of Learning…for the publick Service of the Country in future times.”

Today, over 200 different prizes are awarded each year in recognition of academic excellence, achievement in a particular field, or outstanding individual qualities. The Bowdoin Prizes, established by the bequest of Governor James Bowdoin, AB 1745, are among many noteworthy prizes for which students submit essays, theses, or other scholarly works.

For more information, including prize descriptions, eligibility requirements, and lists of past winners, please see the website for the Prize Office of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Further information is available from the Prize Office, University Hall, Ground Floor (617-495-4780 or prizes@fas.harvard.edu). Information on athletic prizes may be obtained from the Department of Athletics

Phi Beta Kappa

Phi Beta Kappa is an academic honors society committed to the promotion of scholarship in the liberal arts and sciences among the students of American colleges. Alpha Iota of Massachusetts at Harvard, founded in 1781, is the oldest chapter of Phi Beta Kappa in continual existence. Undergraduate members, selected from a pool of candidates with the highest cumulative numerical grade point averages in their academic divisions, are elected on the basis of their scholarly achievement and breadth of intellectual interest. Twenty-four juniors are elected each spring, forty-eight seniors are elected each fall, and in the final election, before Commencement, a sufficient number of degree candidates are elected to bring the total membership to no more than ten percent of each graduating class. Students elected to Phi Beta Kappa have typically chosen the most challenging courses available, pursued independent research as part of an honors concentration, achieved excellence in coursework across all academic divisions, and attained outstanding grades in all courses.

The undergraduate members of Alpha Iota, led by four Phi Beta Kappa Marshals, decide on the Phi Beta Kappa awards for teaching excellence given to three members of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at the Literary Exercises during Commencement Week. The chapter also awards grants for independent research to a number of juniors each spring. For more information see the Harvard College Phi Beta Kappa website.

Academic Performance

All students are required to maintain a satisfactory academic record and meet the obligations of the courses in which they are enrolled. Failure to do so will be dealt with as the Faculty and its designated Boards shall determine. In all cases, midyear grades in year-long courses will be considered along with all other grades in the calculations for minimum requirements and satisfactory records.

Minimum Requirements

To meet the minimum academic requirements in any term, students may have at most one failing grade, which may not be accompanied by another unsatisfactory grade; and at least two satisfactory grades, one of which must be a letter grade in an FAS course taken for degree credit (or in a course taken by cross-registration and counted toward concentration or UTEP requirements). Students who fail to meet the minimum requirements ordinarily will be required to withdraw for two terms, whether or not their previous record was unsatisfactory.

Satisfactory and Unsatisfactory Academic Records

The requirements for a satisfactory academic record are satisfactory grades in all courses, and at least one letter grade in an FAS course taken for degree credit (or in a course taken by cross-registration and counted toward concentration or UTEP requirements). However, for first-year students in their first term, an academic record will be considered satisfactory if all grades are passing, at most one grade is unsatisfactory, and at least one grade is a satisfactory letter grade. A student whose record is unsatisfactory is ordinarily placed on probation. A student with two consecutive unsatisfactory records ordinarily will be required to withdraw for two terms.

The Administrative Board will have the discretion to consider enrollment in the Harvard Summer School as a term for the purposes of the previous paragraph.

Exclusion from a Course

A student who neglects any course may, after written warning by the instructor, be excluded from the course by the instructor with the approval of the Administrative Board. The warning should specify the steps the student must take in order to be allowed to continue in the course. A student may also be excluded from a course by the Honor Council if the student has committed academic dishonesty in the course. Exclusion from a course is equivalent in all respects to failing it and in and of itself makes the student’s record for the term unsatisfactory. A notation of EXLD (excluded) on the transcript indicates that the student was not permitted to continue in the course and received no credit. Students may not withdraw from a course from which they have been excluded. Students excluded from a course are denied any right to further course evaluation, including final and makeup examinations.

Submission of Written Work

Students are responsible for ensuring that required written course work is submitted and received on time. Written work should not be left in open mailboxes or other unattended places but rather given personally and directly to the head of the course or to a responsible person acting on the course's behalf. Papers that are mailed to instructors should be sent by certified mail, and a receipt of delivery should be requested from the Postal Service. The student should keep both the postal receipt and a copy of the paper. If work is submitted electronically, students are responsible for confirming receipt.

Academic Integrity and Academic Dishonesty

Harvard College Honor Code 

Plagiarism and Collaboration

Submission of the Same Work to More Than One Course

Tutoring Schools and Term Paper Companies

Official Forms and Petitions

Harvard College Honor Code 

Members of the Harvard College community commit themselves to producing academic work of integrity – that is, work that adheres to the scholarly and intellectual standards of accurate attribution of sources, appropriate collection and use of data, and transparent acknowledgement of the contribution of others to our ideas, discoveries, interpretations, and conclusions.  Cheating on exams or problem sets, plagiarizing or misrepresenting the ideas or language of someone else as one’s own, falsifying data, or any other instance of academic dishonesty violates the standards of our community, as well as the standards of the wider world of learning and affairs.

Students will be asked to affirm their awareness of the Honor Code and adherence to the standards of academic integrity at various points during the academic semester. The goal of this affirmation is to reinforce the centrality of scholarly integrity to students’ membership in our academic community, as well as to remind students that they have already agreed to adhere to these standards. 

The Affirmation will take several forms, depending on the student’s status and particular assignments.

First-Year Students

In the summer prior to arriving on campus first-year students will be asked to respond briefly to a prompt about how they will uphold the values of the Honor Code. Students will be able to access their statements throughout their time at Harvard and will have the opportunity to update and revise them periodically.

All Students

During the bi-annual electronic check-in registration process, all students will be asked to read the Honor Code and to sign their name indicating their awareness of the Code and adherence to the standards of academic integrity.

At seated final exams, all students will be asked to read and sign the following statement included on the exam attendance slip or printed on the exam itself: “I attest to the honesty of my academic work and affirm that it conforms to the standards of the Harvard College Honor Code.”

On all culminating assignments including final projects, take-home exams, and in-class finals, as well as on senior theses, students will be asked to include a statement of affirmation of the Honor Code at the time of submission. The following text is recommended: “I attest to the honesty of my academic work and affirm that it conforms to the standards of the Harvard College Honor Code.”

Plagiarism and Collaboration

The College recognizes that the open exchange of ideas plays a vital role in the academic endeavor, as often it is only through discussion with others that one is fully able to process information or to crystallize an elusive concept. Therefore, students generally are encouraged to engage in conversations with their teachers and classmates about their courses, their research, and even their assignments. These kinds of discussions and debates in some ways represent the essence of life in an academic community. And yet, it is important for all scholars to acknowledge clearly when they have relied upon or incorporated the work of others. To ensure the proper use of sources while at the same time recognizing and preserving the importance of the academic dialogue, the Faculty of Arts and Sciences adopted the following policy:

It is expected that all homework assignments, projects, lab reports, papers, theses, and examinations and any other work submitted for academic credit will be the student’s own. Students should always take great care to distinguish their own ideas and knowledge from information derived from sources. The term “sources” includes not only primary and secondary material published in print or online, but also information and opinions gained directly from other people. Quotations must be placed properly within quotation marks and must be cited fully. In addition, all paraphrased material must be acknowledged completely. Whenever ideas or facts are derived from a student’s reading and research or from a student’s own writings, the sources must be indicated (see also Submission of the Same Work to More Than One Course below.)

Students must also comply with the policy on collaboration established for each course, as set forth in the course syllabus or on the course website. Policies vary among the many fields and disciplines in the College, and may even vary for particular assignments within a course. Unless otherwise stated on the syllabus or website, when collaboration is permitted within a course students must acknowledge any collaboration and its extent in all submitted work; however, students need not acknowledge discussion with others of general approaches to the assignment or assistance with proofreading. If the syllabus or website does not include a policy on collaboration, students may assume that collaboration in the completion of assignments is permitted. Collaboration in the completion of examinations is always prohibited.

The responsibility for learning the proper forms of citation lies with the individual student. Students are expected to be familiar with the Harvard Guide to Using Sources. Students who are in any doubt about the preparation of academic work should consult their instructor and Resident Dean before the work is prepared or submitted.

Students who, for whatever reason, submit work either not their own or without clear attribution to its sources will be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including requirement to withdraw from the College. Students who have been found responsible for any violation of these standards will not be permitted to submit a course evaluation of the course in which the infraction occurred.

Submission of the Same Work to More Than One Course

It is the expectation of every course that all work submitted for a course or for any other academic purpose will have been done solely for that course or for that purpose. If the same or similar work is to be submitted to any other course or used for any other academic purpose within the College, the prior written permission of the instructor must be obtained. If the same or similar work is to be submitted to more than one course or used for more than one academic purpose within the College during the same term, the prior written permission of all instructors involved must be obtained. A student who submits the same or similar work to more than one course or for more than one academic purpose within the College without such prior permission is subject to disciplinary action, up to and including requirement to withdraw from the College.

Students are urged to consult their Resident Dean or the instructors involved with questions concerning this important matter (see also Plagiarism and Collaboration above).

Tutoring Schools and Term Paper Companies

In keeping with the principle that all material submitted to a course should be the student’s own work, any undergraduate who makes use of the services of a commercial tutoring school or term paper company is liable to disciplinary action. Students who sell lecture or reading notes, papers, or translations, or who are employed by a tutoring school or term paper company, are similarly liable and may be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including requirement to withdraw from the College. If a student wishes to accept compensation for private tutoring in Harvard courses, prior written permission of the Dean of the College is required.

Official Forms and Petitions

Students should understand that providing false or misleading information or signing any other person’s name or initials on a Plan of Study, change-of-course petition, registration form, or on any other official form or petition (hard copy or electronic) will make them subject to disciplinary action, up to and including requirement to withdraw.

Attendance, Absences, Reading Period, Examinations and Extensions

Regarding attendance in class and for examinations, Massachusetts law provides as follows:

Any student in an educational or vocational training institution, other than a religious or denominational educational or vocational training institution, who is unable, because of his religious beliefs, to attend classes or to participate in any examination, study, or work requirement on a particular day shall be excused from any such examination or study or work requirement, and shall be provided with an opportunity to make up such examination, study, or work requirement which he may have missed because of such absence on a particular day; provided, however, that such makeup examination or work shall not create an unreasonable burden upon such school. No fees of any kind shall be charged by the institution for making available to the said student such opportunity. No adverse or prejudicial effects shall result to any student because of his availing himself of the provisions of this section.

[Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 151C: § 2B)]

Attendance

Regular attendance at course meetings and related events is expected of all students. Furthermore, students are expected to remain in the immediate vicinity of Cambridge during the Examination Periods, Reading Periods, and term time with the exception of scheduled vacations and holidays. Students may not be absent from the area for extended periods of time during the term without the permission of their Resident Dean.

A student on probation is required to attend all academic exercises. Unexcused absence by a student on probation renders the student liable to requirement to withdraw from the College at any time.

By vote of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences instructors are required to hold their regular classes on the days preceding and following holidays and vacations. They are not permitted to allow temporary transfer of students from section to section or to excuse students at these times.

Restricted Attendance

With the exception of the first week of classes, when any registered student may attend a class, only students enrolled in a course and auditors who have been given specific permission by the instructor ordinarily may attend course meetings. From time to time, instructors may permit other guests, such as colleagues, parents, alumnae/i, or prospective students, to attend individual class meetings; however, instructors are always free to restrict attendance at a class meeting or meetings to regularly enrolled students and authorized auditors.

Absence from Classes

Students should report all absences that may have a significant effect on their status to their Resident Dean and to the instructor(s) of the course(s) concerned. Students who are called away in an emergency or are otherwise unavoidably absent from the College should notify their Resident Dean both before departure and upon return. Absence from the College without such notification may lead to requirement to withdraw. Students who are sick may consult either Harvard University Health Services or their own physician but should report all cases of serious illness promptly to Harvard University Health Services either in person or by telephone (617-495-5711).

Absence from academic exercises, for whatever reason, including representing the College in extracurricular and athletic activities, does not relieve students from responsibility for any part of the work in the course required during the period of absence.

Storm and Emergency Conditions

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences rarely cancels classes due to weather. However, the faculty and section leaders who need to commute should not put themselves in danger during serious storms, and may choose to cancel their individual classes. Students may find the following information helpful:

  • For the most part, undergraduate students are in residence and are expected to attend classes. Undergraduate students who decide that they cannot make it to class should consult the course materials for instructions on informing the course’s instructional staff of planned absences from class. If such procedures have not been provided, then the student should inform the instructor or the teaching fellow of the planned absence by email or by telephone.
  • Similarly, students may find instructions in the course materials that indicate how the instructional staff would inform students of the cancellation of a class or section meeting. For example, many courses inform students of the cancellation via an announcement posted on the course webpage, via an email to the class attendees, or by leaving a message on the voice mail system of a centralized departmental telephone.
  • FAS offices and academic departments will be open depending on staff availability and whether there are critical functions in progress. Call the central number for that office before going there.
  • Final examinations and makeup examinations are rarely cancelled and students should report to their exam rooms on time.
  • On the very rare occasion when FAS decides to cancel classes, an announcement of the cancellation will be posted at the College home page.

Hour and Midterm Examinations

The administration of hour and midterm examinations (not midyear) is the responsibility of the instructor; ordinarily, such exams should be scheduled during regular class meeting times. In accordance with Massachusetts law, students who are unable to participate in an hour or midterm examination as a consequence of their religious beliefs shall be provided with an opportunity to make up the examination, without penalty, provided that the makeup examination does not create an unreasonable burden on the College. It is the responsibility of the students concerned to provide instructors with the dates on which they will be absent because of a conflict with the religious holidays they will be observing.

If an instructor is satisfied that an absence for a reason other than religious observation is necessary and that omitting a grade for the missed hour or midterm examination will not affect the student’s course grade, final evaluation of the student’s work in the course may be determined from the remainder of the course work. The instructor may also elect to give a makeup examination. The responsibility for such decisions rests with the instructor only, and not with the Dean’s Office or the Administrative Board.

Although instructors are obligated to offer makeup exams only in the case of absence for the observance of a religious holiday, students who have obtained proper Harvard University Health Services (HUHS) documentation of illness may not be penalized for their absence from hour and midterm examinations. The appropriate form must be signed by a HUHS medical professional and given to the student’s Resident Dean, who will write the student a letter that acknowledges receipt of the HUHS form. This letter may be presented to the instructor as certification of the student’s illness.

Reading Period

At the end of each term, a period of six or seven days prior to the start of final examinations is designated as Reading Period. Reading Period is intended to be a time for students to reflect, review, and synthesize what they have learned during the semester.

In order to protect this educational purpose, the following rules apply during Reading Period:

  • With the exception of designated intensive language courses, no regular instruction may take place during Reading Period. Sections and review sessions may take place during Reading Period as may class sessions that must be made up due to weather or other emergencies.
  • Courses may not assign new material during Reading Period.
  • All seated final examinations, of whatever duration (up to three hours) or scope, must take place during the exam slot as assigned by the Office of the Registrar. (See also Final Examination Period.)
  • Final papers, take-home exams, projects, presentations, and other culminating course assignments due after the end of regular classes must be due on or before the day of each course’s assigned Examination Group, but no earlier than the fourth day of Reading Period. Final projects that include individual or group presentations may be scheduled beginning on the fourth day of Reading Period and may extend through the Final Examination and Project Period.*
  • Short, regular assignments that address material covered in the last two weeks of classes (such as problem sets or response papers) may be due during the first three days of Reading Period.

Regardless of whether a class meets during Reading Period, that time is an integral part of the term. Students are expected to remain in the immediate vicinity of Cambridge throughout this period. 

*Each course will be assigned an exam/final deadline group in order to spread out student deadlines and to establish grading due dates. While instructors may establish earlier deadlines per faculty legislation, the spirit of this legislation is to spread students’ final assignment deadlines across the entire exam period to avoid having all assignments due at the same time. If an instructor decides to use an earlier deadline it is very important that students are well informed about this change from the posted deadline.

Final Examination Period

Examination Rules

Late Arrival to Examination

Illnesses During the Examination

Absence from Examinations

Absences for Religious Reasons

Makeups for Examinations: Excused Absences

Examinations in Absentia

Courses that will culminate in a seated final examination scheduled by the Registrar will hold their exams during the designated Final Examination Period. Examinations scheduled during the Final Examination Period are three hours in length. There are two exam sessions each day. Morning exams begin at 9 am and afternoon exams begin at 2 pm. The schedule indicating the exact date, time and location for each three-hour, seated exam is posted online within approximately three weeks of the start of each term. The posted schedule is subject to change.

To seek accommodations for a final exam on account of disabilities, undergraduates must connect in advance with the Accessible Education Office. The Accessible Education Office will work with the faculty member and the Exams Office to make arrangements for accommodations when appropriate and will contact the student directly about the accommodations. For more specific information about final exam accommodations please consult the website of the Accessible Education Office.

Students are responsible for learning the times and locations of exams in their courses and for arriving at their exams on time. Students who miss an exam and who are not granted a makeup exam will receive a permanent ABS (unexcused absence), which is equivalent in all respects to a failing grade.

Most instructors return examination booklets, papers, and other academic work to the students enrolled in their courses. By law, students have the right to review all materials submitted to a course, including final examination booklets, and for a reasonable charge may have copies of any originals not returned to them within 45 days of the date of the original request.

Examination Rules

Students should adhere to the following rules during the administration of regularly scheduled midyear or final examinations.

  • During bathroom breaks, students should not use computers, telephones (land line or cellular), tablets, or other communications devices.
  • In order to avoid any possible suggestion of improper behavior during an examination, undergraduates should refrain from communication with other students while an exam is in progress.
  • Students should also not retain or refer to any books or papers during an examination except with the express permission of the instructor or teaching staff.
  • Eating and drinking are not permitted in any examination room.
  • Personal belongings should be put away and all mobile phones and other electronic devices should be turned off.
  • In the event of a fire, students should take their personal belongings and their exam and booklets and meet in the location announced at the beginning of the exam. Students should not leave the exam site or the emergency meeting location with any exam materials, nor should they discuss the exam with other students during the emergency procedures. For violation of the examination rules or dishonesty in an examination a student may be required to withdraw from the College. Students who fail to obey instructions are liable to disciplinary action.

Late Arrival to Examination

A student who is late for an exam may be refused admission and reported as absent. Students who are late for a final exam should report directly to the exam room. No one will be admitted to an examination more than 30 minutes after the start of the exam. Ordinarily, latecomers will not be allowed to make up lost time.

Illnesses During the Examination

A student who is present for any part of an examination is never entitled to a makeup exam. Any student who becomes ill during an exam, however, should report the illness immediately to the instructor. An ill student will be sent to HUHS, where the student will be kept incommunicado until able to resume the examination. Upon resumption of the examination, the student will be allowed only the balance of time remaining.

Absence from Examinations

To obtain credit for a semester-long course having a final examination, a student must have attended the examination (or its equivalent approved makeup). To obtain credit for a year-long course having fall term and spring term examinations, a student must have attended both exams (or equivalent approved makeup). A student who is absent without excuse from the final examination (or the equivalent approved makeup) of a year-long course fails the entire course and receives no credit for either half of it.

Any student who has an unexcused absence at the fall term final exam in a year-long course must either petition to withdraw from the course without credit (no later than the seventh Monday of the spring term) or petition to be allowed to continue in it in the spring term for half credit only, in which case the failing grade of ABS is permanently recorded for the fall half of the course (see Continuing for the Second Term with an Unexcused Absence on Year-long Courses).

A student may petition for a makeup examination because of illness only if the illness is documented by medical staff at HUHS within the 24-hour period before the beginning of the examination. In an emergency, a student’s illness could be reported to HUHS by a private physician, before the beginning of the examination. The private physician must also supply a written statement to HUHS.

Unavoidable absence from an examination resulting from causes other than illness should be reported and explained in advance to the appropriate Resident Dean.

A student whose record is unsatisfactory because of an unexcused absence from a final or makeup examination ordinarily will be placed on probation or, if the record as a whole so warrants, required to withdraw (see Procedures of the Administrative Board).

Absences for Religious Reasons

As mentioned above regarding attendance and examinations, in accordance with Massachusetts law, students who are unable to participate in a final examination as a consequence of their religious beliefs shall be provided with an opportunity to make up the examination, without penalty, provided that the makeup examination does not create an unreasonable burden on the College. Students who anticipate any religious conflicts with exams are required to submit the Religious Out of Sequence Exam Request Form on the Registrar’s website, thirty days before the start of Exam Period. Conflicts reported after that time may not be possible to accommodate or may result in a makeup exam scheduled for the following term.

Makeups for Examinations: Excused Absences

The Administrative Board has jurisdiction over granting makeup examinations. No instructor may grant or give a makeup examination to any student who missed a final examination without the express authorization of the Registrar and the Administrative Board; nor may a makeup examination be given at any time or place other than that specified by the Registrar. A student granted a makeup exam is not thereby granted an extension of time to complete other written work for the course. Such an extension is granted only by special vote of the Administrative Board (see Extension of Time for Written or Laboratory Work).

Petitions for makeup exams are due in the office of the Resident Dean as soon as possible and no later than one week after each examination. Students having a medical excuse will fill out the petition form at HUHS and take the form personally and directly to the Resident Dean. Students wishing to be excused for other reasons should see their Resident Dean.

A student whose petition for a makeup examination has been granted by the Administrative Board must take the makeup examination at the next regularly scheduled makeup period. Typically, the makeup period is the third week of the following term. No other opportunity to take the examination will be allowed. It is the student’s responsibility to learn exactly when and where the makeup examinations will be given.

The beginning dates for fall and spring term Makeup Examination Periods are listed in the Academic Calendar. The Registrar notifies students via email who have been granted permission to take one or more makeup exams. The email notification specifies the scheduled time and place of their makeup examination(s). If students do not receive an email notification about a makeup exam, it is their responsibility to obtain such information from the Registrar at least two weeks before the beginning of the makeup Examination Period.

Students who have been granted a makeup exam by the Administrative Board but have neither taken it nor canceled it in writing to the Registrar with a copy to the Resident Dean at least one week in advance of the beginning of the Makeup Examination Period will ordinarily be admonished by the Administrative Board. Students who have missed a final exam and have not been granted permission for a makeup will be given the failing grade of “Absent” (ABS) for the course and are thus eligible to be placed on probation or required to withdraw, depending on their academic record for the term.

Students granted makeup examinations and/or extensions of time beyond the end of the Examination Period in two or more courses will not be allowed to register for the next term except by special permission of the Administrative Board. Students granted a makeup examination are not eligible to receive the degree until after final grades have been reported for all of their courses.

Examinations in Absentia

In exceptional cases, students who cannot be in Cambridge at the time of a final or makeup examination may request permission from the Administrative Board to take the examination in absentia. Applications are available from the Registrar.

Petitions for in absentia exams from members of Harvard College varsity athletic teams participating in tournament competitions and students who are either on leave or studying elsewhere for Harvard degree credit may be approved by the Registrar. Other requests require permission of the Administrative Board. Before petitioning to take an examination in absentia, students should consult their Resident Dean.

Students are responsible for any fees incurred in the administration of an in absentia examination, including proctoring fees, postage, and any extraordinary costs incurred in the delivery or administration thereof (room rentals, media rentals, etc.).

Extension of Time for Written or Laboratory Work

Students who encounter unexpected difficulties in completing their work should immediately consult their Resident Dean.

Extensions of time up to the end of the Examination Period may be granted by the instructor. Ordinarily, the student must have received the consent of the instructor before the final examination (or before the final meeting of a course in which there is no final examination). No instructor may accept work from a student in any term after the end of the Examination Period without the express authorization of the Administrative Board.

An extension of time beyond the end of the Examination Period can be granted only by vote of the Administrative Board and only in exceptional circumstances. A student who, for medical reasons, fails during any term to complete the required work in a course, including laboratories, problem sets, or papers, may petition the Administrative Board through the Resident Dean for an extension of time commensurate with the time missed to make up the work.

Students granted extensions of time beyond the end of the Examination Period and/or makeup examinations in two or more courses will not be allowed to register for the next term except by special permission of the Administrative Board. Students granted an extension of time are not eligible to receive the degree until after final grades have been reported for all of their courses.

The notation “Incomplete” (INC), used in the grading of graduate students, cannot under any circumstances be given to undergraduates. In those cases where the Administrative Board has in advance voted approval of an extension of time, the temporary notation EXT will be made for the duration of the extension voted by the Administrative Board. EXT is only a temporary notation; a final grade must be given upon the expiration of the extension as approved by the Administrative Board or if additional time is not granted by the Administrative Board.

Leaves of Absence

Voluntary Leaves of Absence (Granted by Petition)

Involuntary Leaves of Absence

While on Leave of Absence

Use of College Services and Facilities

Course Work Done Out of Residence

Returning to College

Voluntary Leaves of Absence (Granted by Petition)

Students who wish to interrupt their studies at any time before graduation must petition the Administrative Board for a leave of absence. To petition the Board, the student and the student's Resident Dean work together to determine what pertinent information to present to the Board with the petition, and then the Resident Dean brings the petition to the Board on the student’s behalf. With respect to a voluntary leave of absence for medical reasons, the Dean of the College may consult with Harvard University Health Services (which may consider information from the student’s current and/or former health care providers, if made available by the student). Following an individualized assessment, for students on a medical leave of absence, the College may set out specific expectations for them to meet before they may return to the College with the goal of ensuring their readiness to return. It is often useful for students to have a conversation with their Resident Dean about how to approach these expectations.

Students whose previous academic and disciplinary record is satisfactory and who have petitioned by the seventh Monday of the term will normally be granted a “leave of absence.” Students who petition after the seventh Monday of the term will normally be granted a “leave of absence—late in the term.” Students who are not in good standing may be granted a “leave of absence—on probation.” Students who petition for a leave of absence after the tenth Monday of the term ordinarily will not be allowed to register in the next academic term. No petitions for a leave of absence for any term will ordinarily be considered after the first day of Reading Period for that term.

Students going on leave are reminded that all degree candidates, whether currently registered or not, are expected to maintain a satisfactory standard of conduct.

Involuntary Leaves of Absence

Under certain circumstances, a student may be placed on an involuntary leave of absence.  An involuntary leave of absence is not a disciplinary sanction.  However, an incident that gives rise to a leave of absence, whether voluntary or involuntary, may subsequently be the basis for disciplinary action. A student who wishes to take a voluntary leave of absence rather than being placed on involuntary leave of absence will ordinarily be allowed to do so. Transcripts do not distinguish between voluntary and involuntary leaves of absence. As is the case for voluntary leaves, official College letters of recommendation will note any unresolved disciplinary matter that is pending (see Administrative Board Actions and Letters of Recommendation). 

An involuntary leave of absence may be required for the following reasons:

  1. Medical circumstances: (a) The student’s behavior poses a direct threat to the health or safety of any person, or has seriously disrupted others in the student’s residential community or academic environment; and (b) either the student’s threatening, self-destructive, or disruptive behavior is determined to be the result of a medical condition or the student has refused to cooperate with efforts by Harvard University Health Services to determine or evaluate the cause of the behavior. The decision to place a student on an involuntary leave of absence for health related reasons is made in consultation with Harvard University Health Services (which may consider information from the student’s current and/or former health care providers, if made available by the student), after an individualized assessment of all of the pertinent factors, such as: the nature of the student’s conduct; the nature, duration and severity of the risk; the likelihood of potential injury; and whether reasonable modifications of policies, practices or procedures will mitigate the risk. However, reasonable modifications do not include changes that would fundamentally alter the academic program or unduly burden the College’s resources or staffing capabilities or, with respect to the required level of care or monitoring, that would exceed the standard of care that a university health service or the staff of a residential college can be expected to provide. 
  2. Alleged criminal behavior: The student has been arrested on allegations of serious criminal behavior or has been charged with such behavior by law enforcement authorities.
  3. Risk to the community. The student allegedly violated a disciplinary rule of the College, and the student's presence on campus poses a significant risk to the safety of others or to the educational environment of the community.
  4. Indebtedness. The student’s term bill is unpaid and the student has not made arrangements acceptable to the College to address the issue.
  5. Failure to provide medical documentation of required immunizations.
  6. Unfulfilled academic requirements. The student has not met an academic requirement and has not taken steps acceptable to the College to meet the requirement.
  7. Failure to register and enroll. The student has not registered and enrolled in courses as required at the beginning of each term.
  8. Courses not completed: The student has been granted make-up examinations, or extensions of time beyond the end of the term, in two or more courses.

Prior to placing a student on involuntary leave of absence, the Dean of Harvard College will consult with the student’s Resident Dean and, as appropriate, with other officers of the University (for example, with the office of the Director of Harvard University Health Services in the case of leave for medical reasons) or with the Administrative Board.

Students will be notified in writing of the decision to place them on involuntary leave of absence. The student may ask the Dean or the Dean’s delegate, in writing or in person, to reconsider the decision. If the decision remains unchanged, the student may petition the Administrative Board through the student’s Resident Dean.

Students on involuntary leave are reminded that all degree candidates, whether currently registered or not, are expected to maintain a satisfactory standard of conduct.

While On Leave of Absence 

Students who are granted a leave of absence during the academic year are charged tuition, room rent, the Student Services Fee, and board to the end of the period in which they leave, as indicated on the chart Students’ Financial Obligations in the Event of a Leave of Absence or Requirement to Withdraw and in Housing Policies and Deadlines. Students who have been placed on involuntary leave of absence are subject to the same rules regarding financial aid and financial obligations (room, board, tuition, etc.) that apply to undergraduates granted a voluntary leave of absence. 

Students who have signed a room contract to live in College housing and subsequently decide to take a leave of absence must notify the Dean of Students Office - Housing and Residential Life, in writing of their intention not to take up residence. The purpose of this policy is to enable Houses to make unoccupied rooms available to other students as early as possible (for deadlines, see Housing Policies and Deadlines).

All undergraduates going on leave before the end of a term must submit the proper paperwork to their House Office or the Dean of Students Office. Cancellation of board charges is contingent upon the submission of the form; failure to do so will result in a continued assessment of board charges until the end of the term in which the leave occurs. A student granted a leave is expected to vacate University property as soon as possible and no later than five business days after the date of the Administrative Board vote granting the leave. The room key must also be turned in to the House Office or building manager’s office. Students who are on leave may not store any belongings at the University.

Students receiving scholarship or other financial aid should consult the Griffin Financial Aid Office concerning the financial implications of going on leave. Prior to leaving Cambridge those who have borrowed money or received financial aid from Harvard must also have an exit interview at the Griffin Financial Aid Office, 86 Brattle Street. For detailed information see the Financial Aid Office website policies and procedures for Leave of Absence. Students with additional questions or concerns should contact the FAO at 617-495-1581 or faoinfo@fas.harvard.edu. Students who receive veteran’s educational benefits should report to Smith Campus Center 953. Foreign students should consult the International Office concerning their status.

The date a student goes on leave will affect the student's health insurance through Harvard. For details, review the Leave of Absence policy on the HUSHP website, or contact the Student Health Insurance Office, Member Services, at 617-495-2008 or mservices@huhs.harvard.edu.

Students leaving after completion of the fall term should consult the section Year-Long Courses and their Resident Dean concerning dividing or withdrawing from any year-long courses in which they were enrolled.

Students should update their addresses at my.harvard.

Students who have competed on an intercollegiate team or intend to compete on one for the first time upon their return should arrange for an "exit interview" with the Associate Director of Athletics in charge of eligibility before leaving Cambridge.

Use of College Services and Facilities
 
Libraries and other facilities may normally be used only by students who are currently registered. Students on leave or required to withdraw may not participate in extracurricular activities. Exceptions to this rule must be specifically approved in advance by the Administrative Board. The student on involuntary leave may not participate in student activities until officially allowed to register. If so instructed by the Dean of the College or the Administrative Board, a student on leave must remain away from the University campus.

Students are encouraged to consult the Office of Career Services, which may be able to assist them in making plans for their time away from the College. Students who have been granted a leave of absence or have been required to withdraw or placed on involuntary leave may at any time consult their Resident Dean.

Students in good standing who are on a voluntary leave of absence may be permitted to apply for Harvard funding, including but not limited to summer grants, provided that they have obtained the Administrative Board's prior approval. In making this determination, the Administrative Board will consider the relevant circumstances, including, for example, the circumstances that led to the student's leave of absence.

Course Work Done Out of Residence

Students in good standing (see Actions of the Administrative Board) who are granted a leave of absence and who wish to enroll in courses given by another institution for Harvard degree credit should consult Procedures for Earning Degree Credit for Study Abroad. To be granted degree credit for course work done out of residence, a student must apply to the Office of International Education before study begins. Any student who has received a bachelor’s degree from another institution is not eligible to enroll or re-enroll in Harvard College as an undergraduate.

Returning to College

Students in good standing who have been granted a leave of absence may ordinarily return for any term they wish by notifying the Resident Dean twelve weeks in advance of that term. Ordinarily, first-year students taking a leave of absence at any point during their first term will not be allowed to register before the fall term of the next academic year.

A student who has been granted a “leave of absence—late in the term” or a “leave of absence—on probation” must petition the Administrative Board for permission to register and must demonstrate that the circumstances that led to their leave have been satisfactorily addressed and that they are ready to resume their studies. The decision whether to allow a student to return is made by the Administrative Board. Students placed on involuntary leaves of absence must petition the Administrative Board for permission to return and must demonstrate that the circumstances that led to their leave have been satisfactorily addressed and that they are ready to resume their studies.  The decision whether to allow a student to return is made by the Administrative Board. 

If the leave, whether voluntary or involuntary, was for medical reasons, then the student must petition the Administrative Board for permission to register and must demonstrate that the circumstances that led to their leave have been satisfactorily addressed and that they are ready to resume their studies. In addition, so that the College may conduct an individualized assessment of their circumstances, students on medical leave ordinarily will be required to consult with Harvard University Health Services (and to grant permission to Harvard University Health Services to obtain their treatment records and communicate with their treatment providers) so that a professional assessment about the student’s stability and readiness to return can be shared with the College, including the student's participation and progress with appropriate health care providers during their time away.  Evidence of stability must include a written statement describing how the student’s time away has been spent and often includes a substantial period of regular employment at a non-academic job and a suitable letter of recommendation from the employer or employment supervisor. Please also note that if the College learns of serious concerns about the health or well-being of a student who is away from the College but not on a leave of absence, or is on a leave of absence that is not a medical leave of absence, then the College similarly may require the student to consult with Harvard University Health Services (and to grant permission to Harvard University Health Services to obtain their treatment records and communicate with their treatment providers) so that a professional assessment about the student’s stability and readiness to return can be shared with the College. In all such cases, the decision whether to allow a student to return involves an individualized assessment made by the Administrative Board, which may condition the student's return on an agreement to engage in ongoing medical treatment, if such treatment has been recommended by Harvard University Health Services.  

Any disciplinary matter must be resolved before a student on leave of absence will be allowed to return and, if the student has been required to withdraw while on leave of absence, then any conditions for return after a required withdrawal (see Readmission after Requirement to Withdraw) also must be satisfied for the student to be readmitted.

The Administrative Board ordinarily will not approve the return of a student for the fall term whose experience in the Harvard Summer School in the previous summer has been unsuccessful or unsatisfactory.

All students intending to return to the College must obtain a Returning Student Housing Application from Housing and Residential Life, Dean of Students Office, 6 Prescott Street. These applications are due quite early in the preceding term in order to permit the College to provide housing for as many students as possible (see Housing Policies and Deadlines and the Academic Calendar for application deadlines and other information).

Students who do not file the Returning Student Housing Application by the appropriate deadline will be housed on a space-available basis only. Students denied housing on this basis can reestablish eligibility for guaranteed housing by living off-campus for two terms while enrolled and by filing a Returning Student Housing Application before the appropriate deadline. Students whose leaves have extended beyond two years are not guaranteed on-campus housing upon their return to the College but will be housed on a space-available basis (see Those Who Will Ordinarily Be Housed and Those Who Will be Housed On a Space-Available Basis Only).

A student who has filed a Returning Student Housing Application for one term but subsequently decides to return for the following term instead must submit a new application for that following term or request of the Housing and Residential Life, Dean of Students Office, in writing, that the initial application be reactivated.

Students returning from a leave who wish to apply for financial aid must notify the College Griffin Financial Aid Office at 617-495-1581 (or at faoinfo@fas.harvard.edu) by February 1 for the following fall term and by October 1 for the following spring term) and file the necessary application forms (see: the Griffin Financial Aid Office website). Students do not have to be approved to return before submitting their aid application. If a student has taken a leave in the middle of a term and used a portion of their financial aid eligibility, they will need to petition the Financial Aid Committee to be considered for a full semester’s worth of eligibility for their final term. Late applicants cannot be assured that their aid will be available in time for registration payment deadlines.

Students who have been granted a leave and who have borrowed money through Harvard must submit an annual loan deferment form to the Student Loan Office upon their return to Harvard. Deferment forms may be obtained through either the Student Loan Office or the Griffin Financial Aid Office and must be completed and certified by the Registrar immediately following Check-in and Course Registration. Failure to file a deferment form upon return will cause payments to be due on loans and could affect future borrowing eligibility.

A student will not be allowed to register in the University again until all previous term-bill and telephone charges have been paid and no loan is in default.

Students who have been away from the College for five or more years must petition the Administrative Board for permission to register. Those planning to return to the College after a period of five or more years will ordinarily not be eligible for scholarship aid from institutional sources. Petitions for readmission after an interval of five or more years must include evidence of financial resources necessary to meet all College expenses. Exceptions due to unusual circumstances will be considered by the Committee on Financial Aid with input from the Administrative Board. Petitions for an exception should be made through the Griffin Financial Aid Office.

Education Records

Education Records

Access

Directory Information

Other Disclosures Permitted under FERPA

Student Rights Under FERPA

Users Located in the European Economic Area

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended (“FERPA”) is a federal law that gives students certain rights with respect to their education records.

Education Records

Harvard’s Faculty of Arts & Sciences (FAS), which includes both Harvard College and the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, routinely maintains records for its students that describe and document their work and progress. These education records generally include records such as permanent and local addresses, admissions records, enrollment status, course grades, reports and evaluations, completion of requirements and progress toward the degree, records of disciplinary actions, letters of recommendation, and other correspondence with or concerning the student.

Access

To be useful, students’ records must be accurate and complete. The officials who maintain them are those in charge of the functions reflected in the records and the offices where the records are kept. These ordinarily include the Registrar of FAS, as well as certain officers of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and Harvard College, including, for example, the Divisional Deans, the Chairs of academic departments and/or concentration committees, the Director of Admissions, the Dean of Students, the Resident Deans, and the Head Tutors or Directors of Undergraduate Studies. All students have access to their own education records and may contribute to them if they feel there is need for clarification. Students wishing access to their education records should contact the FAS Registrar’s Office. Ordinarily, students are asked to submit a written request that identifies the specific record or records they wish to inspect. Access will be given within 45 days from the receipt of the request. When a record contains information about more than one student, the student requesting access may inspect and review only the portion of the record relating to themselves. Students also are not permitted to view letters and statements of recommendation to which they waived their right of access, or that were placed in their file before January 1, 1975.

Students should direct any questions they have about the accuracy of records to the person in charge of the office where the records are kept. If questions still remain, the matter may be referred to the Associate Registrar for Operations in the FAS Registrar’s Office. Should it be necessary, a hearing may be held to resolve challenges concerning the accuracy of records in those cases where informal discussions have not satisfactorily settled the questions raised.

Directory Information

The Faculty of Arts & Sciences regards the following information as "directory information," that is, information that, under FERPA, can be made available to the general public: full name, reported date of birth, dates of attendance, concentration, class year, digitized image (please note that while Harvard classifies photos and images as directory information, these are rarely released to parties outside the University without the student's permission), local or campus residence address and telephone number, university email address, secondary school (for College students), undergraduate college (for GSAS students), home town or city at the time the application for admission was filed by the student, original class at time of matriculation, degree candidate status, date of graduation (actual or expected), degree(s) received with field of concentration and level of honors granted (if any), department of study, University prizes, fellowships, and similar honors awarded, and, in certain cases, students' and parents' or guardians' home addresses and telephone numbers. For student employees: job title, teaching appointment (if applicable), employing department and dates of employment. For Harvard College, "directory information" also includes: House affiliation, and height and weight of members of athletic teams. Please note that Harvard University’s definition of “directory information,” found at [http://provost.harvard.edu/files/provost/files/ferpa_overview.pdf] may include elements in addition to those used by FAS, and that requests for directory information received at the University level thus may result in disclosure of such additional elements.

Students may direct FAS not to disclose their directory information, usually known as putting in place a “FERPA Block.” To do so, a student must inform the FAS Registrar's Office in person, and sign a form requesting that the information be blocked. Students should be aware of the possible consequences of putting in place a FERPA Block, such as missed mailings, messages, and announcements, non-verification of enrollment or degree status, and non-inclusion in the Harvard Commencement booklet. Students who have previously chosen to put in place a FERPA Block may decide to reverse this decision, also by informing the FAS Registrar’s Office in writing.

Other Disclosures permitted under FERPA

Parents or legal guardians of students are ordinarily informed of important changes of status, such as leaves of absence, probation, and requirement to withdraw. Under certain extenuating circumstances, a student may request an exception to this rule.

In addition to permitting the disclosure of directory information, as set forth above, FERPA permits disclosure of educational records without a student’s knowledge or consent under certain circumstances. For example, disclosure is permitted to Harvard officials with a legitimate educational interest in the records, meaning that the person needs the information in order to fulfill their professional responsibilities, including instructional, supervisory, advisory, administrative, academic or research, staff support or other duties. “Harvard officials” include: faculty; administrators; clerical employees; professional employees; Harvard University Health Services staff members; Harvard University Police Department officers; agents of the University, such as independent contractors performing functions on behalf of FAS or the University; members of Harvard’s governing boards; and students serving on an official FAS, College, GSAS or University committee, or assisting another Harvard official in performing their tasks. A student’s education record also may be shared with parties outside the University under certain conditions, including, for example, in situations involving a health and safety emergency. In addition, the FAS Registrar’s Office will forward a student’s education records to other agencies or institutions that have requested the records and in which the student seeks or intends to enroll or is already enrolled so long as the disclosure is for purposes related to the student's enrollment or transfer.

If either Harvard College or the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences finds that a student has committed a disciplinary violation involving a crime of violence or a non-forcible sex offense, then FAS also may, if legally permitted and appropriate in the judgment of Harvard College or the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, disclose certain information about the disciplinary case. The disclosure may include the student’s name, the violation committed, and the sanction imposed.

Student Rights under FERPA

As set forth above, under both Harvard policy and FERPA, students and former students may inspect and review certain of their education records that are maintained by Harvard. They also have the right to: exercise limited control over other people’s access to their education records; seek to correct their education records if they believe them to be inaccurate, misleading or otherwise in violation of their FERPA rights; file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education if they believe Harvard has not complied with the requirements of FERPA; and be fully informed of their rights under FERPA. Complaints regarding alleged violation of rights of students under FERPA may be submitted in writing within 180 days to the Family Policy Compliance Office, US Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202-5920.

Users Located in the European Economic Area

If you are located in the European Union, Iceland, Liechtenstein or Norway (the “European Economic Area”), please click here for additional information about ways that certain Harvard University Schools, Centers, units and controlled entities, including this one, may collect, use, and share information about you.

General Regulations

Conduct Within the Community

A fundamental goal of the College is to foster an environment in which its members may live and work productively together, making use of the rich resources of the University, in individual and collective pursuit of academic excellence, extracurricular accomplishment, and personal challenge. In the words of the Resolution on Rights and Responsibilities adopted by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences on April 14, 1970, “By accepting membership in the University, an individual joins a community ideally characterized by free expression, free inquiry, intellectual honesty, respect for the dignity of others, and openness to constructive change.”

For this goal to be achieved, the community must be a tolerant and supportive one, characterized by civility and consideration for others. Therefore the standards and expectations of this community are high, as much so in the quality of interpersonal relationships as they are in academic performance. 

Discrimination

Discrimination based on race, color, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion, creed, national origin, age, ancestry, veteran status, disability, military service, or any other legally protected basis is contrary to the principles and policies of Harvard University.  

Complaints of Discrimination

Discrimination on the Basis of Sex, Sexual Orientation, and Gender Identity

The University and the College have developed policies and procedures for complaints of discrimination based on sex, sexual orientation, or gender identity. Sexual and gender-based harassment, including sexual violence, are forms of sex discrimination. The College policies and procedures concerning complaints of discrimination based on sex, sexual orientation, or gender identity are described in the Handbook section on Harassment.

Discrimination on Other Bases

The College has also developed procedures for responding to incidents of all other forms of discrimination. These procedures are described below:

Ordinarily, students should direct their initial inquiries to their Resident Dean or to the Office of the Dean of Harvard College. Students can also report an incident of bias, harassment and/or discrimination by emailing reportbias@fas.harvard.edu.

Undergraduates who feels that they have been subjected to discrimination may wish first to seek a resolution of the problem through their Resident Dean. These officers may consult with others in the College and the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, including, for example, the Office of the Dean of Harvard College, or the Director of the Accessible Education Office, depending on the nature of the concern.

If the matter cannot be resolved satisfactorily by informal methods, more formal routes are available. The student may lodge a complaint with the Office of the Dean of Harvard College. Depending on the circumstances, and in consultation with the student making the complaint, that officer may request that the Dean of Harvard College appoint a special committee to resolve the problem or may refer it to the appropriate agency or office of Harvard College or of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences for resolution. Such agencies include, among others, the Administrative Board, the Faculty Council, and the Dean of the Faculty.

If the matter cannot be resolved satisfactorily through ordinary channels, either the student or the Dean of Harvard College may refer it to the Dean of the Faculty for final resolution. The Dean of the Faculty holds authority over all departments, committees, commissions, and councils within the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. The disposition of the Dean of the Faculty will be final.

Harassment

Information and Advice

Racial Harassment

Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment

Recognizing that harassment, including on the basis of race, sex, sexual orientation, and gender identity, constitutes unacceptable behavior, the University, the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and the Faculty Council have issued a number of documents setting forth the position of the College on these matters, as well as the procedures that are available to students who believe that they have been the object of such harassment.

It is important to note here that speech not specifically directed against individuals in a harassing way may be protected by traditional safeguards of free speech, even though the comments may cause considerable discomfort or concern to others in the community. The College still takes such incidents seriously and will try, when appropriate, to mediate and help students involved to resolve the situations in an informal way. On the other hand, any use of electronic mail or the telephone to deliver obscene or harassing messages will be treated as a serious matter and ordinarily will result in disciplinary action by the College (see also Electronic Communication and Obscene or Harassing Telephone Calls).

Information and Advice

The College encourages undergraduates who believe that they have been the object of harassment to seek information and advice concerning applicable harassment policies, informal resolution and formal complaints, and counseling and other services.

In cases of racial harassment, students may always seek the assistance of their Resident Dean, Faculty Dean, or Racial Harassment Hearing Officer in the Office of the Dean of Harvard College.

In cases of sexual and/or gender-based harassment, undergraduate students are encouraged to contact either a College Title IX Coordinator, the University Title IX Office, or the Office for Dispute Resolution (“ODR”). Although different Title IX Coordinators have different areas of particular expertise (College, GSAS, DCE, Students, Faculty, Staff), any Title IX Coordinator can provide information about the resources and options available and can contact other FAS or University officers for assistance, as appropriate.  Students may also seek the assistance of their Resident Dean, Faculty Dean, House- or Yard- designated tutors/proctors for sexual harassment, or the BGLTQ tutors/proctors.

All FAS officers will treat information they have received with appropriate sensitivity, but may, in certain circumstances, need to share certain information with those at the University responsible for stopping or preventing harassment. Persons wishing to have confidential conversations that will not be shared with local Title IX Coordinators may contact the Office of Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (OSAPR), the Office of BGLTQ Student LifeCounseling and Mental Health Services, and/or Harvard Chaplains. In cases of racial harassment, students may always seek the assistance of their Allston Burr Resident Dean or Resident Dean of First-Year Students, Faculty Dean, or Racial Harassment Hearing Officer in the Office of the Dean of Harvard College.

 

Faculty Policy Statement on Racial Harassment

Faculty Policy Statement on Racial Harassment

The Faculty policy statement on racial harassment is set forth below:

Harvard College seeks to maintain an instructional and work environment free from racial harassment. The College defines racial harassment as actions on the part of an individual or group that demean or abuse another individual or group because of racial or ethnic background. Such actions may include, but are not restricted to, using racial epithets, making racially derogatory remarks, and using racial stereotypes. Any member of the College community who believes that they have been harassed on account of race is encouraged to bring the matter to the attention of their Resident Dean or the designated race relations adviser in their House or First-Year Yard.

The College’s investigation and adjudication process is designed to be careful and fair. No person will be reprimanded or discriminated against in any way for initiating an inquiry or complaint in good faith. The rights of any person against whom a complaint is lodged will be protected during the investigation.

Procedures for Informal and Formal Resolution of Allegations of Racial Harassment

The College’s investigation and adjudication processes are designed to be careful and fair. No person will be reprimanded or retaliated against in any way for raising an allegation of harassment, for cooperating in an investigation of such a complaint, or for opposing discriminatory practices. The rights of any person against whom a complaint is lodged will be protected during an investigation. 

Informal Resolution

A student may consult any adviser or administrator as described above in order to obtain help in clarifying and resolving a situation of perceived racial harassment. Throughout the advising process, information will be treated with appropriate sensitivity and in many circumstances will be kept private by the adviser.

Some reported incidents of harassment involve stereotyping or insensitive or offensive behavior that is the result of miscommunication or lack of communication rather than malicious intent. Calling the matter to the attention of the person or group engaged in such behavior is often enough to bring a stop to it. A person seeking resolution with the help of an adviser may ask the adviser to intervene in order to make the offender aware of their behavior. This intervention may result in an apology to the offended person, changes in behavior, and closure of the incident, thus providing the desired resolution. Where an instructional relationship exists between the parties, changing that relationship may also be helpful. On the other hand, if the offensive behavior continues, intervention may be only the beginning of a longer, more complex process of resolution and remedy.

Throughout the process of informal resolution there will be regular communication between the adviser and the person making the inquiry. In addition, the offended person will receive support for handling the emotional or other effects of the incident or inquiry. The College strongly encourages those with questions or concerns to bring them to the attention of an appropriate adviser.

Formal Complaint

When a formal complaint of racial harassment is made against a student, the matter is referred directly to the Administrative Board of Harvard College, the Student-Faculty Judicial Board or the disciplinary body of the graduate or professional school as appropriate. When a formal complaint of racial harassment is made against a faculty or staff member, it is handled according to the process described below.

In such a situation, the designated Racial Harassment Hearing Officer can provide advice and assistance to the complainant, both in presenting the case and, where appropriate, by referring the complainant to other helpful sources of advice and counsel.

Individuals who wish to file a complaint should contact the Racial Harassment Hearing Officer in the Office of the Dean of Harvard College or their Resident Dean. Merely discussing a complaint with one of the officers does not commit one to making a formal charge. However, the matter may be pursued by one of the officers of the Faculty if the behavior is determined to be a community matter.

Formal procedures are initiated by filing a written and signed complaint that may be shown to the accused person. The Hearing Officer will consult with the complainant and with the person named in the complaint in order to ascertain the facts and views of both parties. The Hearing Officer or the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences may at any point dismiss a complaint if it is found to be without merit. If such an action is taken, the complainant and the accused will be informed of this decision. If, however, the evidence appears to support the complaint, the Hearing Officer will conduct an inquiry and prepare a report for submission to the Dean, summarizing the relevant evidence. A draft of the report will be shown to the complainant, to the respondent, and to the Dean, in order to give them the opportunity to respond before the final report is made. The final report summarizing the findings will be sent to the complainant, the respondent, and the Dean. Both the complainant and the respondent will have the opportunity to comment on the report in a written statement to the Dean.

Upon consideration of the final report, the Dean of the Faculty may take whatever action is warranted or ask the investigative officer to discuss the matter further and to submit a supplementary report. Final action by the Dean completes the procedure in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.

Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment Policy and Procedures for the Faculty of Arts and Sciences

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) is committed to fostering an open and supportive community that promotes learning, teaching, research, and discovery. This commitment includes maintaining a safe and healthy educational and work environment in which no member of the community is excluded from participation in, denied the benefits of, or subjected to discrimination in any University program or activity on the basis of sex, sexual orientation, or gender identity. Because sexual and gender-based harassment – including, but not limited to, sexual violence – interfere with an individual’s ability to participate fully in or benefit fully from University programs or activities, they constitute unacceptable forms of discrimination.

The University Policy applies to all Harvard students, faculty, staff, Harvard appointees, and third parties. The University Procedures govern allegations of sexual and gender-based harassment involving Harvard students, including undergraduate students in the College.

Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment Policy

The FAS Policy adopts the University Policy and incorporates the University Procedures, including for purposes of student discipline. The University Policy is reproduced in its entirety here. Please see the entire Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment Policy for the Faculty of Arts and Sciences to view additional sections of the Policy not reproduced here that refer to additional conduct prohibited by the FAS.

Policy Statement

Harvard University is committed to maintaining a safe and healthy educational and work environment in which no member of the University community is, on the basis of sex, sexual orientation, or gender identity, excluded from participation in, denied the benefits of, or subjected to discrimination in any University program or activity. Gender-based and sexual harassment, including sexual violence, are forms of sex discrimination in that they deny or limit an individual’s ability to participate in or benefit from University programs or activities.

This Policy is designed to ensure a safe and non-discriminatory educational and work environment and to meet legal requirements, including: Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in the University’s programs or activities; relevant sections of the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act; Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in employment; and Massachusetts laws that prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex, sexual orientation, and gender identity. It does not preclude application or enforcement of other University or School policies.

It is the policy of the University to provide educational, preventative and training programs regarding sexual or gender-based harassment; to encourage reporting of incidents; to prevent incidents of sexual and gender-based harassment from denying or limiting an individual’s ability to participate in or benefit from the University’s programs; to make available timely services for those who have been affected by discrimination; and to provide prompt and equitable methods of investigation and resolution to stop discrimination, remedy any harm, and prevent its recurrence. Violations of this Policy may result in the imposition of sanctions up to, and including, termination, dismissal, or expulsion, as determined by the appropriate officials at the School or unit.

Retaliation against an individual for raising an allegation of sexual or gender-based harassment, for cooperating in an investigation of such a complaint, or for opposing discriminatory practices is prohibited. Submitting a complaint that is not in good faith or providing false or misleading information in any investigation of complaints is also prohibited.

Nothing in this Policy shall be construed to abridge academic freedom and inquiry, principles of free speech, or the University’s educational mission.

Definitions

Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment is unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature, including unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal, nonverbal, graphic, or physical conduct of a sexual nature, when: (1) submission to or rejection of such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a condition of an individual’s employment or academic standing or is used as the basis for employment decisions or for academic evaluation, grades, or advancement (quid pro quo); or (2) such conduct is sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive that it interferes with or limits a person’s ability to participate in or benefit from the University’s education or work programs or activities (hostile environment).

Quid pro quo sexual harassment can occur whether a person resists and suffers the threatened harm, or the person submits and avoids the threatened harm. Both situations could constitute discrimination on the basis of sex.

A hostile environment can be created by persistent or pervasive conduct or by a single severe episode. The more severe the conduct, the less need there is to show a repetitive series of incidents to prove a hostile environment. Sexual violence, including rape, sexual assault, and domestic and dating violence, is a form of sexual harassment. In addition, the following conduct may violate this Policy:

  • Observing, photographing, videotaping, or making other visual or auditory records of sexual activity or nudity, where there is a reasonable expectation of privacy, without the knowledge and consent of all parties
  • Sharing visual or auditory records of sexual activity or nudity without the knowledge and consent of all recorded parties and recipient(s)
  • Sexual advances, whether or not they involve physical touching
  • Commenting about or inappropriately touching an individual's body
  • Requests for sexual favors in exchange for actual or promised job benefits, such as favorable reviews, salary increases, promotions, increased benefits, or continued employment
  • Lewd or sexually suggestive comments, jokes, innuendoes, or gestures
  • Stalking

Other verbal, nonverbal, graphic, or physical conduct may create a hostile environment if the conduct is sufficiently persistent, pervasive, or severe so as to deny a person equal access to the University’s programs or activities. Whether the conduct creates a hostile environment may depend on a variety of factors, including: the degree to which the conduct affected one or more person’s education or employment; the type, frequency, and duration of the conduct; the relationship between the parties; the number of people involved; and the context in which the conduct occurred.

Unwelcome Conduct

Conduct is unwelcome if a person (1) did not request or invite it and (2) regarded the unrequested or uninvited conduct as undesirable or offensive. That a person welcomes some sexual contact does not necessarily mean that person welcomes other sexual contact. Similarly, that a person willingly participates in conduct on one occasion does not necessarily mean that the same conduct is welcome on a subsequent occasion.

Whether conduct is unwelcome is determined based on the totality of the circumstances, including various objective and subjective factors. The following types of information may be helpful in making that determination: statements by any witnesses to the alleged incident; information about the relative credibility of the parties and witnesses; the detail and consistency of each person’s account; the absence of corroborating information where it should logically exist; information that the Respondent has been found to have harassed others; information that the Complainant has been found to have made false allegations against others; information about the Complainant’s reaction or behavior after the alleged incident; and information about any actions the parties took immediately following the incident, including reporting the matter to others.

In addition, when a person is so impaired or incapacitated as to be incapable of requesting or inviting the conduct, conduct of a sexual nature is deemed unwelcome, provided that the Respondent knew or reasonably should have known of the person’s impairment or incapacity. The person may be impaired or incapacitated as a result of drugs or alcohol or for some other reason, such as sleep or unconsciousness. A Respondent’s impairment at the time of the incident as a result of drugs or alcohol does not, however, diminish the Respondent’s responsibility for sexual or gender-based harassment under this Policy.

Gender-Based Harassment

Gender-based harassment is verbal, nonverbal, graphic, or physical aggression, intimidation, or hostile conduct based on sex, sex-stereotyping, sexual orientation or gender identity, but not involving conduct of a sexual nature, when such conduct is sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive that it interferes with or limits a person’s ability to participate in or benefit from the University’s education or work programs or activities. For example, persistent disparagement of a person based on a perceived lack of stereotypical masculinity or femininity or exclusion from an activity based on sexual orientation or gender identity also may violate this Policy.

Jurisdiction

This Policy applies to sexual or gender-based harassment that is committed by students, faculty, staff, Harvard appointees, or third parties, whenever the misconduct occurs:

1. On Harvard property; or

2. Off Harvard property, if:

a) the conduct was in connection with a University or University-recognized program or activity; or

b) the conduct may have the effect of creating a hostile environment for a member of the University community.

Monitoring and Confidentiality

A variety of resources are available at the University and in the area to assist those who have experienced gender-based or sexual harassment, including sexual violence.

Individuals considering making a disclosure to University resources should make sure they have informed expectations concerning privacy and confidentiality. The University is committed to providing all possible assistance in understanding these issues and helping individuals to make an informed decision.

It is important to understand that, while the University will treat information it has received with appropriate sensitivity, University personnel may nonetheless need to share certain information with those at the University responsible for stopping or preventing sexual or gender-based harassment. For example, University officers, other than those who are prohibited from reporting because of a legal confidentiality obligation or prohibition against reporting, must promptly notify the School or unit Title IX Coordinator about possible sexual or gender-based harassment, regardless of whether a complaint is filed. Such reporting is necessary for various reasons, including to ensure that persons possibly subjected to such conduct receive appropriate services and information; that the University can track incidents and identify patterns; and that, where appropriate, the University can take steps to protect the Harvard community. This reporting by University officers will not necessarily result in a complaint; rather, the School or unit Title IX Coordinator, in consultation with the Title IX Officer, will assess the information and determine what action, if any, will be taken. Information will be disclosed in this manner only to those at the University who, in the judgment of the Title IX Officer or School or unit Title IX Coordinator, have a need to know.

Should individuals desire to discuss an incident or other information only with persons who are subject to a legal confidentiality obligation or prohibition against reporting, they should ask University officers for information about such resources, which are available both at the University and elsewhere. University officers are available to discuss these other resources and to assist individuals in making an informed decision.

Violations of other Rules

The University encourages the reporting of all concerns regarding sexual or gender-based harassment. Sometimes individuals are hesitant to report instances of sexual or gender-based harassment because they fear they may be charged with other policy violations, such as underage alcohol consumption. Because the University has a paramount interest in protecting the well-being of its community and remedying sexual or gender-based harassment, other policy violations will be considered, if necessary, separately from allegations under this Policy. 

Other Sexual and Gender-Based Misconduct Pursuant to the FAS Policy

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences, including the College, share an additional commitment to training our students to be citizens and citizen leaders within a larger community beyond the borders of our campus. For this reason, it is the expectation of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences that all students, whether or not they are on campus or are currently enrolled in a degree program, will behave in a mature and responsible manner. Consistent with this principle, sexual and gender-based misconduct are not tolerated by the FAS even when, because they do not have the effect of creating a hostile environment for a member of the University community, they fall outside the jurisdiction of the University Policy. Because sexual and gender-based misconduct are in direct opposition to our community values, cases involving such conduct may be referred by the Administrative Board to the Harvard University Office for Dispute Resolution (“ODR”) for investigation in accordance with the University Procedures and the FAS Policy and Procedures. 

To read more about other sexual and gender-based misconduct, including “Conduct in Relationships between Individuals of Different University Status,” please see sections III and IV of the Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment Policy for the Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Procedures for Implementing the Policy, Including for Discipline

FAS Procedures for Implementing the Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment Policy, Including for Discipline

Introduction

Harvard students, faculty, staff, and other Harvard appointees, or third parties wishing to report a violation of this Policy, should begin by contacting the Harvard University Office for Dispute Resolution (“ODR”) or the relevant FAS Title IX Coordinator. In the event that the first FAS officer contacted by an Initiating Party is not the appropriate Title IX Coordinator, it is that FAS officer’s responsibility to forward the matter either to ODR or to the appropriate Title IX Coordinator.

Interim Measures

As set forth in the FAS Procedures and in the University Procedures, interim measures designed to support and protect the Initiating Party or the University community may be considered or implemented at any time, including during a request for information or advice, informal resolution, or a formal complaint proceeding. Consistent with FAS policy, interim measures might include, among others: restrictions on contact; course-schedule or work-schedule alteration; changes in housing; leaves of absence; or increased monitoring of certain areas of the campus. Interim measures are subject to review and revision throughout the processes described below.

Requests for Information and Advice

Any FAS student or staff or Faculty member who has a concern, inquiry, or complaint regarding sexual or gender-based harassment or misconduct should feel free to seek information and advice concerning applicable policies, informal resolution, the formal complaint process, and counseling and other services.

For information and advice, members of the FAS community are encouraged to contact either ODR or any Title IX Coordinator within FAS.

Please use the following information to contact ODR:

Office for Dispute Resolution
odr@harvard.edu
617-495-3786
Smith Campus Center, Suite 901
1350 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138

The College Title IX Coordinators are listed on the Harvard College Title IX website.

  • Erin Clark
Title IX Coordinator, Harvard College
erin_clark@fas.harvard.edu
617-495-3336
024 University Hall
Cambridge, MA 02138
  • Brian Libby
Assistant Director, Office of International Education
Title IX Coordinator, Harvard College
blibby@fas.harvard.edu
617-384-6943
1414 Massachusetts Avenue, 3rd Floor
Cambridge, MA 02138
 
Visit this website to find the full list of FAS Title IX Coordinators: http://titleix.harvard.edu/coordinators
 
Title IX Coordinators  

Who they are

Title IX Coordinators serve in a neutral role and support all members of the Harvard community. Coordinators have specialized experience in responding to disclosures of sexual and gender-based harassment in the Harvard community. They are also aware that your concerns may be of a sensitive nature and can offer supports to help you continue with your work or studies while maintaining appropriate discretion.

If you have concerns about events you were involved in, an incident you observed, or an incident that you were told about involving another member of the community, we encourage you to have a conversation with a Title IX Coordinator. Additionally, if you have questions about the investigative process or generally want to learn more about the relevant policies and procedures, please do not hesitate to contact one of your Coordinators. Speaking with a Title IX Coordinator is not the same as filing a formal complaint with the Office for Dispute Resolution.

What they can do for you

  • Provide accurate, consistent information about the resources and options available to students both on-campus and in the broader community;
  • Help to arrange interim measures, the supports to help continue with studies and participate in all aspects of campus life at Harvard; and,
  • Help students access ODR and/or learn more about the complaint process.

Discretion and Sensitivity

Title IX Coordinators are trained to handle sensitive information with appropriate discretion. Although not a confidential resource, they respect and protect privacy to the greatest extent possible, sharing information only on a need-to-know basis, for example, to evaluate interim measures or to enable the University to take action to ensure the safety of the community. 

Procedures Concerning Alleged Harassment by Students (Please see Section VI of the FAS Policy for more information on the procedures briefly described below)

Informal Resolution

An individual who is concerned about sexual or gender-based harassment may make a request for informal resolution to an FAS Title IX Coordinator, the Title IX Officer, or ODR.

Formal Complaints

An initiating Party may file a formal complaint against a Student, directly with ODR, alleging a violation of this Policy. If an Initiating Party submits a formal complaint to a Title IX Coordinator, the Title IX Coordinator will forward the formal complaint to ODR. 

The FAS Procedures are intended to supplement the University Procedures and detail the FAS role at moments when the University Procedures refer to actions taken or decisions made by the School or unit. You can find the FAS procedures here. Section (VI) C, sets out procedures pertaining to allegations of sexual or gender-based harassment committed by a student, including a student at Harvard College, GSAS, and both the Extension School and the Summer School within DCE. Sections (VI) D and E, set out procedures pertaining to allegations of sexual or gender-based harassment committed by Faculty and staff. 

 

 

Faculty Resolutions

On April 14, 1970, the Faculty of Arts and Sciences approved the Resolution on Rights and Responsibilities, printed below in its entirety (members of the community should also be aware of the Faculty’s Free Speech Guidelines, available at secfas.fas.harvard.edu). This University-wide Statement and its first interpretation were adopted on an interim basis by the Governing Boards on September 20, 1970, and were voted to remain in effect indefinitely in May 1977. The second interpretation was adopted by the Governing Boards in January-February 2002.

Resolution on Rights and Responsibilities

The central functions of an academic community are learning, teaching, research and scholarship. By accepting membership in the University, an individual joins a community ideally characterized by free expression, free inquiry, intellectual honesty, respect for the dignity of others, and openness to constructive change. The rights and responsibilities exercised within the community must be compatible with these qualities.

The rights of members of the University are not fundamentally different from those of other members of society. The University, however, has a special autonomy and reasoned dissent plays a particularly vital part in its existence. All members of the University have the right to press for action on matters of concern by any appropriate means. The University must affirm, assure and protect the rights of its members to organize and join political associations, convene and conduct public meetings, publicly demonstrate and picket in orderly fashion, advocate, and publicize opinion by print, sign, and voice.

The University places special emphasis, as well, upon certain values which are essential to its nature as an academic community. Among these are freedom of speech and academic freedom, freedom from personal force and violence, and freedom of movement. Interference with any of these freedoms must be regarded as a serious violation of the personal rights upon which the community is based.

Furthermore, although the administrative processes and activities of the University cannot be ends in themselves, such functions are vital to the orderly pursuit of the work of all members of the University. Therefore, interference with members of the University in performance of their normal duties and activities must be regarded as unacceptable obstruction of the essential processes of the University. Theft or willful destruction of the property of the University or of its members must also be considered an unacceptable violation of the rights of individuals or of the community as a whole.

Moreover, it is the responsibility of all members of the academic community to maintain an atmosphere in which violations of rights are unlikely to occur and to develop processes by which these rights are fully assured. In particular, it is the responsibility of officers of administration and instruction to be alert to the needs of the University community; to give full and fair hearing to reasoned expressions of grievances; and to respond promptly and in good faith to such expressions and to widely expressed needs for change. In making decisions which concern the community as a whole or any part of the community, officers are expected to consult with those affected by the decisions. Failures to meet these responsibilities may be profoundly damaging to the life of the University. Therefore, the University community has the right to establish orderly procedures consistent with imperatives of academic freedom to assess the policies and assure the responsibility of those whose decisions affect the life of the University.

No violation of the rights of members of the University, nor any failure to meet responsibilities, should be interpreted as justifying any violation of the rights of members of the University. All members of the community—students and officers alike—should uphold the rights and responsibilities expressed in this Resolution if the University is to be characterized by mutual respect and trust.

Interpretation

It is implicit in the language of the Statement on Rights and Responsibilities that intense personal harassment of such a character as to amount to grave disrespect for the dignity of others be regarded as an unacceptable violation of the personal rights on which the University is based.

It is implicit in the University-wide Statement on Rights and Responsibilities that any unauthorized occupation of a University building, or any part of it, that interferes with the ability of members of the University to perform their normal activities constitutes unacceptable conduct in violation of the Statement and is subject to appropriate discipline.

Commission of Inquiry

Any student, faculty member, or administrative officer who has a complaint or an inquiry may address it to the Commission of Inquiry, c/o Secretary of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, University Hall, First Floor (617-495-4780). The Commission will redirect the complaint or query to the appropriate agency of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. When such an agency does not exist, the Commission itself will attempt to aid in resolving the matter. Occasionally, the Commission is instrumental in establishing a new agency for handling recurrent issues. Although the Commission has no power to make rulings, it can play an advocacy role in pressing for the resolution of issues.

Ordinarily, the Commission reports to the community on the matters which come before it, and in doing so, attempts to keep the community informed about factual background material and the resolution of matters of community concern.

University Ombudsman Office

The University Ombudsman Office is an independent resource for problem resolution serving the academic community. The office is available to all Harvard faculty, students, post-docs, research personnel, and staff. The office supplements but does not replace any mechanisms for addressing grievances within the College and other parts of the University. The office has no power to adjudicate, arbitrate, or to make formal investigations. The ombudsman is confidential, neutral, and independent. A visitor can discuss issues and concerns with the ombudsman without committing to further disclosure or any formal resolution. The ombudsman may assist individuals in finding solutions for problems that they may have been unable to resolve using existing channels. The ombudsman can help analyze and assess avenues for conflict resolution, including assistance with both written and verbal communications. Next steps are always determined by the visitor, depending on the circumstances and comfort with possible options. Provided all parties agree, the ombudsman may facilitate conversations through shuttle diplomacy, informal mediation, or be present in a discussion as a neutral party. Typical issues may include academic and research disputes, adviser-student relationships, harassment, inappropriate behavior, unprofessional conduct, disability or illness, problematic work climate, and resource referral.

The University Ombudsman Office officially reports to the Executive Vice President with a dotted line to the Provost but is independent of any University administrative structure. Office operations are consistent with the code of ethics and the practices of The International Ombudsman Association. To learn more about the Ombudsman Office, please visit the website for the University Ombudsman Office.

Standards of Conduct in the Harvard Community

The rules and regulations affecting undergraduates have been established by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Students are expected to be familiar with those regulations covered in this Handbook that apply to them. The rules of Harvard College provide a framework within which all students are free to pursue their work, under the safest and most equitable conditions the College can create. These rules, then, serve as the guidelines forming the protection of each individual’s well-being. Whenever violations of the rules occur, the College will treat them as matters of serious concern because they disrupt the individual lives of students, and the shared life of this community.

It is the expectation of the College that all students, whether or not they are on campus or are currently enrolled as degree candidates, will behave in a mature and responsible manner. This expectation for mature and responsible conduct also encompasses accountability for one’s own well-being, including responsible decision-making regarding physical and mental health. Further, the College expects every student to be familiar with the regulations governing membership in the Harvard community, set forth in the pages that follow. Because students are expected to show good judgment and use common sense at all times, not all kinds of misconduct or behavioral standards are codified here. The College takes all these diverse principles very seriously; together they create a foundation for the responsible, respectful society that Harvard seeks to foster among its students, faculty, and staff.

Careful note should be taken that the University is not, and cannot be considered as, a protector or sanctuary from the existing laws of the city, state, or federal government.

Physical Violence

Harvard College strives to maintain a safe and secure environment for all members of the community and thus does not tolerate physical violence or threats of physical violence used by or against the members of the community. Students are expected to avoid all physical conflicts, confrontations, and altercations unless their own safety or that of another is at extreme jeopardy. Failure to do so will ordinarily result in disciplinary action, including, but not limited to, requirement to withdraw from the College (see also Sexual Assault and Other Sexual Misconduct).

 

Honesty

The College expects that all students will be honest and forthcoming in their dealings with the members of this community. Further, the College expects that students will answer truthfully questions put to them by a properly identified officer of the University. Failure to do so ordinarily will result in disciplinary action, including, but not limited to, requirement to withdraw from the College.

All students are required to respect private and public ownership; instances of theft, misappropriation, or unauthorized use of or damage to property or materials not one’s own will ordinarily result in disciplinary action, including requirement to withdraw from the College.

 

Sexual Misconduct

FAS’s Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment Policy that adopts the University Policy and incorporates the University Procedures, including for purposes of student discipline, covers all forms of sexual harassment, including sexual misconduct. As explained in the policies, sexual violence, including rape, sexual assault, and domestic and dating violence, is a form of sexual harassment.

Legal Recourse

Rape and indecent assault and battery are felonies in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and any student who believes that they have suffered a rape or indecent assault and battery is strongly encouraged to report the incident to the HUPD immediately (617-495-1212) or the local police where the alleged incident occurred.

Students who wish to report an allegation of sexual violence may also choose to initiate a formal complaint with the Office for Dispute Resolution. For more information regarding the formal complaint process, please visit ODR's website or visit the University’s Title IX website.

Formal complaints within the University may be pursued whether or not a complainant chooses to file criminal charges. Counseling and consultations regarding emotional, legal, and administrative concerns are available to those students who wish to pursue either University or criminal charges, or both. 

Resources

Harvard and the local community provide many resources to support, advise, and assist victims of rape and sexual assault. All of the following resources have had training to deal effectively with sexual assault. In addition to HUPD and HUHS, Harvard College has administrative officers and counselors available to help. Some resources are as follows:

University Resources:

Title IX Office Website

This website provides information regarding Harvard’s Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment Policy, procedures, as well as the many resources available to prevent and respond to sexual and gender-based harassment at Harvard.

Harvard University Police Department (HUPD)
Sensitive Crimes Unit - 
617-495-1796 - 8 am–4 pm
After these hours, HUPD, 617-495-1212
https://www.hupd.harvard.edu/personal-and-violent-crime

Office of Sexual Assault Prevention and Response

24 Hour-Hotline: 617-495-9100
Business: 617-495-5636

Peer Education and Counseling

Consent Advocates and Relationship Educators (CARE) (peer education)

RESPONSE
 (peer counseling for sexual assault) 
Visit:  Lowell House Basement E-013
, Sun.-Weds., 8 p.m. - 11 p.m.
Call: 617-495-9600, every night, 8 p.m.- 8 a.m.

Title IX

Title IX at Harvard College

TBA, Title IX Coordinator, Harvard College
Contact: TBA

Brian Libby, Title IX Coordinator, Harvard College
Contact: blibby@fas.harvard.edu, 617-384-6943

Title IX at Harvard University

Nicole Merhill, Title IX Officer
Contact: nicole_merhill@harvard.edu, 617-496-2470

Office for Dispute Resolution (ODR)

William McCants, Director for the Office for Dispute Resolution
Contact: odr@harvard.edu, 617-495-3786

Harvard University Health Services

HUHS Behavioral Health Services

HUHS Medical After-Hours Service 
Pound Hall, Harvard Law School
 - 617-495-5711 - nights and weekends

HUHS Counseling and Mental Health Services
Smith Campus Center - 
617-495-2042

Harvard Chaplains

Community Resources:

Beth Israel Hospital Emergency Room (West Campus) (for medical evidence collection within 5 days of a sexual assault)

Clinical Center, Pilgrim Road, Boston
 - 617-754-2400

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Rape Intervention Program
617-667-8141

Boston Area Rape Crisis Center Hotline
99 Bishop Allen Drive (Central Square) Cambridge
 - 617-492-RAPE or 617-492-7273

Cambridge Hospital Victims of Violence Program

Central Street Health Clinic, Somerville
 - 617-591-6360

Outside Agencies:

U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights (OCR)

U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)

Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (MCAD)

If a student does not wish to use these Harvard or Community resources, HUPD and the College encourage any students who have been sexually assaulted to identify a trusted friend, family member, counselor, or other source of support to help deal with the emotional trauma they may experience, and know that at any time, there are additional resources available.

Ideally, a good source of support will allow a survivor of sexual assault or rape to make decisions and take control over the choices they make after the assault. For additional information about University support and resources for sexual violence, visit the Harvard University Police Department webpage on Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking.

Drugs and Alcohol

Summary of City, State, and Federal Laws and Regulations

Health Concerns

Referrals for Interventions/Treatment Regarding Alcohol and/or Other Drug Abuse

Grounds for Referral

Referral Letter

AODS Interventions

Monitoring Student Compliance

Disciplinary Action

Help-Seeking Policy

Responsibilities of Student Groups

Application of the Help-Seeking Policy to Student Groups

Usual Responses

Responsible Social Events

Policies and Procedures Governing Private Parties in the Houses

Harvard expects its students and employees to maintain an environment that is safe and healthy. The unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees on Harvard property or as a part of any Harvard activity are violations of University rules as well as the law. Possession, use, or distribution of certain non-prescription drugs, including marijuana, amphetamines, heroin, cocaine, and non-prescription synthetics; procurement or distribution of alcohol by anyone under 21 years of age; and provision of alcohol to anyone under 21 years of age are violations of the law and of Harvard policy.

Although Massachusetts law now permits adults aged 21 or older to possess and consume marijuana under certain circumstances, federal law prohibits the possession, use, or distribution of marijuana, including for medical purposes, on Harvard property or as part of a Harvard activity. Thus, even if possession or use of marijuana would be permitted under Massachusetts law, it remains prohibited on campus.

College policies and procedures also reflect additional expectations for student conduct based on the College's concerns about high-risk drinking behaviors, such as binge drinking and the rapid or competitive consumption of alcohol, and their many adverse consequences for students' health and lives. All students are expected to comply with the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and with all College rules governing possessing or serving alcohol. More information is available at your House website or the website for the Dean of Students Office. The University holds its students and employees responsible for the consequences of their decisions to use or distribute illicit drugs or to serve or consume alcohol. Additionally, the misuse of prescription drugs (sharing, buying, or using in a manner different than prescribed) is a violation of University policy. 

Summary of City, State, and Federal Laws and Regulations

  1. The sale, delivery, or furnishing of alcohol to persons under the age of 21 is prohibited.
  2. The possession or transportation of alcoholic beverages by individuals under the age of 21 is prohibited.
  3. Social hosts may be held liable for injuries caused by guests who consume alcohol at the hosts’ premises and then harm themselves or third parties.
  4. Willfully misrepresenting one's age or altering, defacing, or otherwise falsifying identification offered as proof of age, with the intent of purchasing alcoholic beverages is prohibited.
  5. There are heavy penalties, including imprisonment, for possession or distribution of illicit drugs and for selling or delivering alcohol to, or procuring alcohol for, anyone under 21.
  6. The consumption of alcohol on public property or on property open to the public is prohibited.

All students are expected to comply with all applicable city, state, and federal laws and regulations as well as with all College rules governing the use and possession of alcohol. The College does not permit transportation or consumption of alcoholic beverages in open containers in public areas on campus.

Health Concerns

The use of illicit drugs and the misuse of alcohol or prescription drugs are potentially harmful to health. In particular, synthetically-produced drugs often have unpredictable emotional and physical side effects that constitute an extreme health hazard. Students should also weigh the seriousness of potential loss of function that may come from ingesting illicit drugs or too much alcohol. Because of the considerable hazards involved in drug and alcohol use, administrative, medical, and psychiatric help for students having alcohol or other drug problems are available on a confidential basis from the Office of Alcohol & Other Drug Services (AODS) and other departments within Harvard University Health Services (HUHS), as well from Resident Deans and other officers of the University. Any member of the University may make use of the Health Services on an emergency basis, day and night.

Referrals for Interventions/Treatment Regarding Alcohol and/or Other Drug Abuse

The following procedures outline the process for obtaining consultation for a Harvard College student whose known or suspected alcohol or drug use is affecting the student's ability to function effectively as a student and/or as a member of the Harvard community. Referrals may be made by a Resident Dean based on incidents that come to their attention or as a result of Administrative Board action. Interventions with AODS are not intended to take the place of routine advising conversations between Resident Deans and students. Rather, they provide an opportunity for structured consultation, particularly for those students who may not view their substance use or related negative consequences as problematic. The procedures and resources outlined below are focused upon the health and safety of the student.

Grounds for Referral

Any of the following conditions may lead a Resident Dean or the Administrative Board to refer a student for an intervention with AODS about the student's known or suspected alcohol or drug use:

  • a medical complication resulting from alcohol or drug use (e.g., aspiration, traumatic accident, alcohol poisoning, seizure, blackout, overdose, infection from intravenous use);
  • repeated incidents related to alcohol or drug use that require medical intervention;
  • a serious behavioral or disciplinary problem related to alcohol or drug use;
  • disruption in the residential community or academic environment related to alcohol or drug use;
  • academic difficulties or other problems in functioning related to misuse of alcohol or drugs; or
  • repeated minor infraction of rules regarding alcohol or drug use.

Referral Letter

The Resident Dean makes the referral for an intervention in writing to the student with a copy to the Director of AODS and a copy for the student’s file. The referral letter frames the referral as a consultation regarding the student’s alcohol or drug use, rather than as treatment or counseling. The referral letter clearly communicates that the student is expected to schedule the appointment(s) with an AODS staff member and complete the designated program within a specified time of receiving the letter (ordinarily, no more than three weeks) and is to comply with all of the provider's recommendations. It is also made clear in the referral letter that, should the student choose to decline the referral, the Resident Dean and senior officers of the House and the College will assess, on the basis of available information, whether it is appropriate for the student to continue in residence and remain enrolled in the College. For more information on this topic, see the Handbook section on Life in the Harvard Community, under the sub-heading “Consultations and Interventions for Behavioral Disturbances Due to Alcohol or Drug Abuse and Psychological Disturbances.” 

AODS Interventions

The AODS staff member will meet with the student individually either for an Individual Consultation or for two BASICS (Brief Alcohol Screening & Intervention for College Students) sessions. Ordinarily, students who are evaluated at HUHS for alcohol intoxication, or for cases involving marijuana and/or other drugs, are referred for individual consultations and students treated at a hospital for alcohol intoxication are referred to BASICS. Both interventions involve discussing the student’s substance use history and circumstances surrounding the referral, and may then direct the student to further resources. Resources include, but are not limited to, alcohol education (Individual Consultations or BASICS), further assessment, ongoing counseling, and/or substance abuse groups, offered through Counseling & Mental Health Services. It should also be noted that support is available from HUHS with or without a referral—students can also access AODS services on their own. 

Monitoring Student Compliance

During the intervention, the AODS staff member will seek permission from the student to contact the appropriate College officer (typically, the student’s Resident Dean) regarding the student’s attendance and participation in the session(s) and what further action, if any, is recommended. Authorized release forms are used as necessary.

It is the responsibility of the Resident Dean, in consultation with the Director of AODS and other senior College officials, to follow-up with the student upon notification of a student’s failure to comply with the recommended assessment, intervention, or treatment.

Disciplinary Action

The University requires all students to become familiar with the information on drugs and alcohol distributed at registration each year and expects students to make responsible choices and create safe social environments. The College will take serious action, ordinarily probation or requirement to withdraw, in any case involving the possession in quantity or the sale or distribution of drugs, or when cases of drug and alcohol use create a danger to individuals or to the community at large. The College will also take action in cases in which a student is involved in the falsification of identification with the intent of obtaining alcohol. If a person was seriously harmed, or could have been seriously harmed, as a result of consuming drugs or alcohol provided by another person, then the College may take disciplinary action against the person who provided the drugs or alcohol, up to and including requirement to withdraw. However, the College has adopted a Help-Seeking Policy, as set forth below.

Help-Seeking Policy

We expect students to abide by the law and Harvard policy on the use of drugs and alcohol. The University is not a sanctuary from the existing laws of the city, state, or federal government and students must recognize the consequences of their personal decisions as well as the impact those decisions can have on themselves, others, and the wider College community.

However, in cases of drug or alcohol intoxication, health and safety are the College’s primary concerns and this policy is intended to encourage students to seek help.

Students seeking medical treatment for themselves or another person for the effects of drug or alcohol use will not be subject to disciplinary action from the College for violations pertaining to the use or provision of drugs or alcohol. Sources of help might include: HUHS or other medical providers; College residential life staff; and HUPD or other police or security officers.

This policy does not provide immunity from disciplinary action relating to any other conduct violations, including, without limitation, assault, property damage, or the possession in quantity or the sale or distribution of drugs. See Standards of Conduct.

Responsibilities of Student Groups

The College expects officers of all student groups (whether or not such group is officially recognized by the College), like any other social hosts, to create safe social environments. To this end, student group officers are urged to participate in annual education efforts with the Office of Alcohol and Other Drug Services and DSO, which may include training on event planning, risk reduction, and the responsible service of alcohol.

If a person was seriously harmed, or could have been seriously harmed, as a result of consumption of alcohol or drugs at an event held, sponsored, organized or supported by a student group and those directly responsible for the provision of alcohol or drugs are not identified, then the College may hold the event hosts personally responsible. If the event hosts are not identified, then the officers of the organization may be held personally responsible. In considering such cases, the College will, in all circumstances, apply the Help-Seeking Policy as described below.

At a minimum, when cases involving the consumption of alcohol or drugs at an event held, sponsored, organized or supported by a student group come to the attention of the College, the student group may be asked to come to the Dean of Students Office for a conversation about their procedures for hosting responsible social events and may be asked to participate in additional education or training efforts.

Application of the Help-Seeking Policy to Student Groups

The Help-Seeking Policy is intended to encourage all members of student groups to access help for the effects of drug or alcohol use. If a person needs assistance after consuming alcohol or drugs at an event held, sponsored, organized or supported by a student group and the person who seeks assistance is a member of that student group, then the College will weigh this fact heavily as a mitigating circumstance when considering potential disciplinary action with respect to other student group members. Conversely, the failure to seek help by members of the student group also may be considered in deciding whether to impose disciplinary action. In addition, the College may consider as mitigating factors the student group’s participation in the College’s annual education and training about responsible social events, as well as any efforts made by the hosts or officers to prevent the harmful or potentially harmful situation and their cooperation with the College in its investigation of the situation.

Usual Responses

As described above, officers of the College initially may respond to the use of illicit drugs, underage possession or consumption of alcohol, serving alcohol to underage individuals, or overconsumption of alcohol with a warning and/or referral to the AODS. The College believes that education and treatment approaches for individuals who receive emergency medical attention may reduce the likelihood of future occurrences. However, a pattern of behavior in violation of rules governing drug or alcohol use or possession will lead to warning by the Faculty Dean or Senior Assistant Dean of the First Year Experience, admonition by the Administrative Board, probation, or requirement to withdraw.

Responsible Social Events

Harvard College is committed to supporting a residential and educational community that is culturally, intellectually, and socially enriching for our students. A healthy and satisfying social life is an important aspect of the undergraduate experience and plays a vital role in developing the bonds of friendship, collegiality, and community. While alcohol may have a place in social activities, its role is ancillary to the mission and purpose of our residential and educational community.

The College encourages students to socialize and interact with each other in safe and healthy ways. We favor a multifaceted approach to alcohol education, policy, and practice that prioritizes student health and safety and promotes student welfare. We encourage responsible social behavior in a variety of ways, including educating the community through peer education programs such as Drug & Alcohol Peer Advisers (DAPA) and Consent Advocates & Relationship Educators (CARE). We implemented the Help-Seeking Policy to help ensure that students seek medical care for their peers. Each year, we dedicate significant resources to support a wide range of alcohol-free programming alternatives at the House, Yard, and campus-wide levels.

Policies and Procedures Governing Private Parties in the Houses

  1. Students who are 21 years of age or older are permitted to possess, store, and consume alcohol in their assigned rooms.
  2. Students who wish to host private parties with alcohol must be at least 21 years of age. If the private party is to be held in a suite, the hosts must be residents of the room in which the private party will be held.
  3. All private parties must be registered with and approved by the House. Houses may determine the deadlines and means of submitting registrations provided the following minimum requirements are met:
    1. Student hosts must meet with their tutor prior to hosting their first private party of the academic year.
    2. Student hosts must demonstrate a satisfactory understanding of strategies to create safe social environments as well as their understanding of the applicable laws and policies governing alcohol, including responsibilities for social hosts.
    3. Student hosts must acknowledge responsibility for compliance with all applicable laws and policies.
  4. Private parties are by personal invitation only. When choosing how many students to invite, a host should be mindful of the number of students permitted to be present in the suite at one time (see section 11 below). Advertising is prohibited. Use of social media is only permitted in the context of private and directed invitations. (e.g. private messages on Facebook, direct message on Twitter).
  5. Host(s) of private parties must be present for the entire event, monitor the event, and make sure there is no underage or unsafe drinking.
  6. Ample water, non-alcoholic beverages, and food must be provided for the duration of any private party or event at which alcohol will be available. Water and non-alcoholic beverages must be as visible and accessible as the alcoholic beverages that are being served. Adequate food also must be provided. Alcohol may not be served at an event until water, non-alcoholic beverages, and food are also available; alcohol may not be served if the water, non-alcoholic beverages, or food become unavailable.
  7. The amount of alcohol purchased must be scaled for the reasonably anticipated number of attendees of legal drinking age.
  8. Activities that promote high-risk drinking, such as excessive and/or rapid consumption of alcohol, particularly of a competitive nature, are not permitted. It is expected that hosts will plan parties where drinking is not the central activity.
  9. Tutors or other House residential staff will check in at least once throughout the course of each private party.
  10. If a tutor has concerns that a private party is not being managed well, then the tutor will speak with the host(s) about the concerns, require that the host(s) resolve the concerns, and check the event again after a short time. If the concerns are not properly addressed, then the tutor will take steps to shut down the event.
  11. Private parties are limited to the number of students that can be safely in the suite, as determined by the House.
  12. At the discretion of the House, where the architecture of student suites makes them unsuitable for private parties, House common spaces may be used by student residents who wish to host private parties. In such cases, the rules provided in this section apply.

Policies and Procedures Governing Social Events on Campus

  1. For the purpose of this policy, “social events on campus” mean any organized functions held in House common areas (e.g. Junior Common Rooms, Dining Halls, Grilles) or non-residential facilities (e.g. the Student Organization Center at Hilles, Ticknor Lounge) where alcohol is served.
  2. All social events on campus must be registered and approved. See Additional Policies and Procedures Related to Specific Types of Social Events for specific registration and approval requirements.
    1. Alcohol is generally permitted only at social events that are limited to members of the Harvard community and their escorted guests. In certain limited circumstances alcohol also may be permitted at day or evening events that are open to the public, but only with prior approval of the Dean of Students Office.
    2. Alcohol is never permitted at late-night social events that are open and advertised to attendees beyond the Harvard community.
  3. Ample water, non-alcoholic beverages, and food must be provided for the duration of any social event at which alcohol will be available. Water and non-alcoholic beverages must be as visible and accessible as the alcoholic beverages that are being served. Adequate food also must be provided. Alcohol may not be served at an event until water, non-alcoholic beverages, and food are also available; alcohol may not be served if the water, non-alcoholic beverages, or food become unavailable.
  4. Age Verification, Alcohol Service, and Monitoring
    1. Proper verification of age is required at social events on campus where alcohol is served.
    2. Acceptable identification for age verification of Harvard affiliates is a valid state or government ID accompanied by a Harvard University ID. Failure to have both of these pieces of identification will result in a request for additional forms of ID, and may result in the denial of alcohol service. Non-Harvard guests must show at least two forms of ID, one of which must be a valid state or government ID.
    3. A “best practices” system for making sure that alcohol is provided only to those who are of age must be established and implemented. One such system is to identify those who are 21 and older by a non-transferable identifier (e.g. wristbands).
    4. Social event attendees will not be served more than one alcoholic beverage at a time.
    5. For social events on campus with alcohol that are hosted by student organizations, Houses, or College offices or centers, a Student Event Services (SES) Team (comprised of TIPS – Training for Intervention Procedures – trained bartenders) must be engaged to handle both age verification and the service of alcohol. With the approval of the Dean of Students Office, College offices or centers may choose instead to use a licensed and insured vendor to provide bartending service.
    6. In the case of small House events where attendance is limited only to the residents of the host House, either a member of the House residential life staff or a member of an SES Team may handle age verification. A member of the SES Team, the House residential life staff, or the student organizers (provided they are of legal drinking age) may serve the alcohol.
    7. Throughout the duration of all social events on campus, those in charge of age verification and alcohol service must continue to monitor and ensure that alcohol is not provided to students who are under 21 and that students who are of legal drinking age are not over-served. If any non-compliance is not corrected, then the event will be terminated.
    8. In the case of House events, member(s) of the House staff must be present for the duration of the event. If a staff member has concerns that the event is not being properly monitored (for example, IDs are not being checked to identify those who are over or under 21, alcohol is being provided to those under 21, or alcohol is being consumed by those under 21), the staff member will speak with the host(s) about these concerns and ensure that the identified issues are corrected.
  5. Quantity and Types of Alcohol
    1. The amount of alcohol purchased must be scaled for the reasonably anticipated number of attendees of legal drinking age.
    2. With the approval of Faculty Dean or authorized designee for House events and College staff for other campus events, kegs are generally permitted in the Houses and at College events, although they continue to be banned at athletic facilities and athletic events. Students must comply with all House or other protocols for registration, storage, and disposal of kegs.
    3. Only beer, wine, and malt beverages may be served at social events on campus. These beverages must not have an alcohol content that exceeds 15 percent.
    4. “Bring Your Own Beer/Booze” (BYOB) events are not permitted. All alcohol served at an event must be purchased and provided by the event host(s).
  6. Serving Times
    1. The service of alcohol at social events on campus may not last longer than five hours. With the exception of events that are two hours or less, last call must occur 30 minutes prior to the scheduled conclusion of the event and alcohol service must end 15 minutes prior to the scheduled conclusion of the event.
  7. Advertising 
    1. Printed and electronic posters for social events on campus may mention alcohol, provided they use the following specific and approved language:
      1. “Non-alcoholic beverages available. Beer 21+”
      2. “Non-alcoholic beverages available. Beer and wine 21+”
    2. Only the Dean of Students Office may approve variations to this standard language for campus-wide advertisements, regardless of where the event is to be held. A House may approve variations to the standard language for events to be held within the House and advertised only within the House. Advertisements may contain no other references to alcohol, including without limitation: price of alcoholic beverages; types of beers, wines, or mixed drinks available; or photos or logos of alcoholic beverages.
  8. Licenses
    1. If there will be a direct charge (such as a cash bar) or indirect charge (such as an event admission fee) for alcohol, a one-day alcohol license from the City of Cambridge is required.
    2. An officer of the University will obtain alcohol licenses for College-sponsored events.
    3. Social events on campus licensed by the City of Cambridge must conclude no later than 2 a.m. Social events in the Houses not requiring a license must conclude at a reasonable time, as determined by the Faculty Dean and House Committee. Social events in other campus locations not requiring a license must conclude at a reasonable time, as determined by DSO.
  9. Other Regulations
    1. Activities that promote high-risk drinking, such as excessive and/or rapid consumption of alcohol, particularly of a competitive nature, are not permitted. It is expected that hosts will plan parties where drinking is not the central activity.
    2. Alcohol companies, services, or distributors may not provide support (i.e. monetary, gifts in kind, products) for social events on campus.
    3. To comply with fire safety regulations, events in spaces without Certificates of Inspection may not exceed capacity of 49 persons.
    4. Police security is required when the event is open to the broader Harvard College community and may otherwise be required at the discretion of the Faculty Dean, Resident Dean, or DSO.

Additional Policies and Procedures Related to Specific Types of Social Events

In addition to the policies and procedures set forth above, the following policies and procedures also apply to certain social events with alcohol.

  1. Small House Committee and House Events (e.g. Stein Clubs, Happy Hours, House Dinners)
    1. Events can only be advertised in the host House and must follow the guidelines outlined in the House Committee Events Resource (available through the DSO).
    2. Events are limited to House residents and their invited guests. Guests must present a college or valid government or state ID and be signed in by their hosts at the door.
  2. Large House-Sponsored Events (e.g. Formals, House Dances, House Theatre)
    1. Approval for all such events is required from both the House and DSO. The event must be registered through the DSO using the Event Registration Form found at https://roombook.harvard.edu/ and follow all guidelines related to event registration, ticketing, and management in the HoCo Events Resource.
    2. Large House events are ordinarily held in a common area of a House. In special cases, with the approval of the Faculty Dean and DSO, an event may be held in an outside facility, but only if adequate arrangements for transportation have been made and the off-campus venue is licensed to serve alcohol, if alcohol is to be served.
    3. Events are generally limited to House residents and their invited guests, but in some cases, at the discretion of the House and DSO, other members of the Harvard community may be invited. Guests must present a college or valid government or state ID and be signed in by their hosts at the door.
    4. Events must be ticketed through the Harvard Box Office and must follow all applicable guidelines for capacity.
    5. If the event is held in the Quad, additional shuttles from Harvard Transportation Services will be provided by DSO.
    6. Transportation back to campus is required for late-night events sponsored by the College and held off campus. The sponsoring House, Office, or Center must arrange and pay for transportation.
    7. Events must end no later than 11:00 PM Sunday-Thursday, and 2:00 a.m. Friday-Saturday. The only exception to this rule is that, with prior permission from the Faculty Dean and DSO, House Formals held Sunday-Thursday may end at any time up to 2:00 a.m.
  3. Student Organization Events:
    1. Student organization events with alcohol held in House common areas and non-residential facilities must be registered with the DSO. All House and facility-specific registration requirements must also be met in order for such events to be approved.
    2. SES Beverage Servers are required when alcohol is served. SES Event Supervisors may be required to monitor events to ensure that student hosts are effectively implementing the Event Plan established with the DSO.
    3. Policies relating to Student Organization events can be found online at the DSO website.  

Continuation of Pilot Program for 2019-2020 permitting mixed drinks at House Formals only

During the 2019-20 academic year, the College will again permit mixed drinks (drinks containing hard liquor) to be served at House formals held on or off campus only if the following conditions are met:

  1. The kinds of mixed drinks to be served must be approved in advance by both the Faculty Deans and the DSO.
  2. All drinks containing hard liquor must include mixers and may not contain more than one standard measure of alcohol.
  3. Professional bartenders from a licensed and insured vendor approved by DSO must be hired to mix and serve drinks.
  4. Beer, wine, and malt beverages can be served open bar. Mixed drinks may only be offered for purchase or limited drink ticket system developed and approved by the Faculty Deans and DSO to ensure that appropriate limits are in place.

 

Student Business Activity

Harvard permits undergraduates to undertake modest levels of business activities on campus. Students may be required to move businesses entirely off-campus should they disrupt residential life, compromise the educational environment, or jeopardize the nonprofit status of the University or any exemption of its income or property from federal, state or local taxation.

A “business activity” is any activity carried on by a student that is intended to or does generate revenue or trade, whether or not for profit, and is not an individual employment or independent contractor relationship.

Compliance with the following general restrictions, mentioned elsewhere in the Handbook, also apply to student business enterprises. Use of the Harvard name or logo in conjunction with a business enterprise is prohibited (see Use of the Harvard Name and Insignia). All regulations concerning safety and the use of rooms must be observed (see Meetings and Events). The compilation or redistribution of information from University directories (printed or electronic) is forbidden (see Privacy of Information). Use of library resources for commercial purposes is prohibited (see The Use of Libraries, Research Support and Use of Collections). General regulations concerning use of computers and networks must be observed (see Use of Computers and Networks). Excessive data traffic on Harvard’s computer network is not allowed. 

In addition, care must be taken to avoid excessive use of University resources, misuse of University facilities and information provided primarily for Harvard’s teaching and research missions, and activities that might jeopardize the tax-exempt status of the University or its property. Students must establish a means of communication with customers separate from those provided by the University for educational purposes. Students may not list their dormitory address, campus mailing address or telephone number, Harvard email or Internet address, or Harvard website in conjunction with any business enterprise, or in any way suggest that Harvard endorses or sponsors the business. Harvard reserves the right to restrict or control student business use of its resources, facilities, academic product, copyrighted materials, and institutional data.

Student businesses are considered outside vendors by the College and must follow the Handbook rules concerning solicitation on campus (see Publicity and Solicitation). Sales activities are permitted only with permission and at the discretion of the office granting permission (e.g. the Director of Student Employment or the Dean of Students Office). Distribution of materials on campus must be conducted through Harvard Student Agencies. Student businesses are not allowed to poster or door-drop on campus.

Other areas of concern, which could cause the College to prohibit the student business, include:

  • Excessive use of Harvard’s paper mail system.
  • Activity by a student as a corporate agent or commercial solicitor for a business.
  • Other activities that compromise the educational collegiality of the Harvard community by coloring with a profit motive the day-to-day interactions among students, faculty, and other College officers.
  • Excessive foot traffic or movement of goods into or out of University buildings.
  • Activities that interfere with roommates’ rights to use common spaces for their own residential purposes.
  • Commitment of time and effort to a commercial activity to an extent that compromises a student’s academic or personal well-being.

Student businesses may be required to seek approval in advance for operations that directly impact University offices, operations, facilities, or resources.

 

Other Regulations

Any student in possession of stolen goods is subject to disciplinary action.

Students may not bring into the University or use or transport any radioactive materials within its property without authorization of the University’s Department of Environmental Health and Safety.

Use of the names and insignia of Harvard College and Harvard University or any of its units by any student is permitted only as spelled out in the University Policy on the Use of the Harvard Names and Insignia. In particular, reference to “Harvard,” “Harvard College,” or “Harvard University,” or suggestions of affiliation with the College or University in connection with any organization, publication, activity, or third party is allowable only with advance permission of the Dean of Harvard College or the Provost.

A student who commits an offense against law and order during a public disturbance or demonstration or who disregards the instructions of a proctor or other University officer at such a time is subject to disciplinary action and may be required to withdraw.

Students are requested not to engage on College property in any games that might annoy others, cause damage, or injure passersby.

Bicycles, roller blades, and skateboards may not be ridden in Harvard Yard or on sidewalks or other walkways and may not be parked on or adjacent to ramps providing access to the disabled. Moreover, violation of any motor vehicle registration and parking regulations (see Vehicle Registration and General Parking Regulations) can lead to disciplinary action.

No student shall be connected with any advertising medium (including the press, the Internet, or other public forum) or publication that makes use of the name of Harvard or Radcliffe or implies without permission of the University, through its title or otherwise, a connection with the University.

No firm, agency, organization, or individual shall solicit in a University dormitory at any time, for any purpose. Exceptions to this rule may be granted only by the Committee on College Life.

Distribution of printed matter in College buildings must be approved by the Office of the Dean of Harvard College, University Hall, First Floor (see Publicity and Solicitation).

Students who fail to pay their University bills by the prescribed date will be deprived of the privileges of the University and not allowed to graduate.

 

Regulations Concerning the Use of University Resources

The Use of Libraries, Research Support and Use of Collections

Use of Computers and Networks

Use of Facilities

Privacy of Information

Electronic Communication

Email Accounts

Intellectual Property and Copyrighted Materials

Harvard University Identification Cards

Membership in the University affords students access to a wide array of resources including among others one of the world’s greatest libraries, extensive computing and network facilities, laboratories, and works of art and architecture of immeasurable value. Access to these resources makes time at Harvard a special privilege, and students have both rights and responsibilities regarding their use. To safeguard the integrity of such resources, the University relies on its students to use them with care, appropriately, and as authorized; to respect the rights of others who also have access; and to observe the rules granting access to, and use of, those resources. Failure to abide by the rules governing their use ordinarily will result in disciplinary action.

The Use of Libraries, Research Support and Use of Collections

Harvard’s libraries serve the University’s students, faculty, staff and other authorized members of the scholarly community, advancing scholarship and teaching through a commitment to the creation of knowledge.

In order to provide an environment conducive to research, to ensure that Harvard's collections are secure, and to enable effective access to knowledge and data, users are expected to respect the regulations around use of library materials and property and to assist in the stewardship of library materials whenever possible. Harvard promotes an attitude and atmosphere of mutual respect, cooperation, and consideration among its library staff, and expects the same from its community of library users.

To protect its collections, a student who violates the use and lending policies of any Harvard library may be subject to overdue charges and/or disciplinary action. In particular, damage caused to any library materials or property, or unauthorized removal of any book or object from a library will result in disciplinary action.

Those with access to Harvard’s library spaces and collections are required to acknowledge and abide by the Patron Agreement, which is outlined below:

Every user of the Library has a responsibility to:

  • Safeguard the integrity of library resources
  • Respect any restrictions regarding access to and the use of those resources
  • Report to library staff the theft, destruction, or misuse of library resources by others
  • Respect the rights of others to the quiet use of library spaces
  • Respect the authority of the library staff who are responsible for promoting and protecting access to library spaces and resources

The following activities are prohibited:

  • Illegal copying
  • Systematic exploitation for profit of library resources or materials
  • Unauthorized removal of materials or property from the library
  • Destruction, defacement, or abuse of library materials or property
  • Use of library privileges for reasons other than personal research
  • Possession of alcohol or other controlled substances within the library
  • Possession of weapons of any kind within the library including, but not limited to: firearms, knives, razor blades, mace, or pepper spray
  • Animals are not permitted in the library, with the exception of assistance and service animals

Those who fail to comply with library rules and regulations are subject to revocation of library privileges, disciplinary action, and legal prosecution. All library users are subject to the fines and penalties imposed by the University as well as the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

For every academic department or program, a Library Liaison is available to help with questions and to support your studies and research. Staff is also available to help navigate digital collections and tools; to locate, use and borrow materials; and to answer questions about lending policies across Harvard’s library system. Full information about Library Liaisons and research assistance is available on their website

Use of Computers and Networks

Using Harvard's network to download or share copyrighted music, movies, television shows or games without the permission of the copyright owner may result in legal sanctions, network termination, and/or disciplinary action.

Some versions of BitTorrent or other file-sharing programs can transmit files on your computer to others in violation of copyright laws, with or without your knowledge. If these programs are on your computer, you will be held responsible for any copyright violations that may result.

Students who are provided access to University computer facilities and to the campus-wide communication network assume responsibility for their appropriate use. The University expects students to be careful, honest, responsible, and civil in the use of computers and networks. Those who use wide-area networks (such as the Internet) to communicate with individuals or to connect to computers at other institutions are expected to abide by the rules for the remote systems and networks as well as those for Harvard’s systems.

Be advised that, in addition to violating College rules, certain computer misconduct is prohibited by federal and state law and is, therefore, subject to criminal and civil penalties. Such misconduct includes knowingly gaining unauthorized access to a computer system or database; falsely obtaining electronic services or data without payment of required charges; intentionally intercepting electronic communications; and obtaining, altering, or destroying others’ electronic information. Similarly, serious legal penalties may result from the use of Harvard’s computers or network to violate copyright laws, as is possible with the use of peer-to-peer file-sharing programs. Moreover, a student may be held responsible for misuse that occurs by allowing a third party access to the student’s own computer, account, or network connection.

The basic rules for the appropriate use of computers and networks are outlined below. Other policies may be found on the Harvard University Information Technology website. Students are expected to abide by these rules and policies and to consult an official of Harvard University Information Technology prior to any activity that would appear to threaten the security or performance of University computers and networks. Failure to do so may result in disciplinary action. 

Use of Facilities

Computer and network facilities are provided to students primarily for their educational use. These facilities have tangible value. Consequently, attempts to circumvent accounting systems or to use the computer accounts of others will be treated as forms of attempted theft.

Students may not attempt to damage or to degrade the performance of Harvard’s computers and networks and should not disrupt the work of other users. Students may not attempt to circumvent security systems, or to exploit or probe for security holes in any Harvard network or system, nor may students attempt any such activity against other systems accessed through Harvard’s facilities. Execution or compilation of programs designed to breach system security is prohibited unless authorized in advance. Students assume personal responsibility for the use of their accounts. Consequently, students may not disclose their passwords or otherwise make Harvard’s facilities available to unauthorized individuals (including family or friends). Moreover, the possession or collection of others’ passwords, PINs, private digital certificates, or other secure identification information is prohibited. Use of Harvard’s computers and networks for business-related purposes without authorization is also prohibited. (See Student Business Activity.

Privacy of Information

Information stored on a computer system or sent electronically over a network is the property of the individual who created it. Examination, collection, or dissemination of that information without authorization from the owner is a violation of the owner’s rights to control their own property. Information technology personnel, however, may gain access to users’ data or programs when it is necessary to maintain or prevent damage to systems or to ensure compliance with other University rules.

Computer systems and networks provide mechanisms for the protection of private information from examination. These mechanisms are necessarily imperfect and any attempt to circumvent them or to gain unauthorized access to private information (including both stored computer files and messages transmitted over a network) will be treated as a violation of privacy and will be cause for disciplinary action.

In general, information that the owner would reasonably regard as private must be treated as private by other users. Examples include the contents of electronic mail boxes, the private file storage areas of individual users, and information stored in other areas that are not public. That measures have not been taken to protect such information does not make it permissible for others to inspect it.

On shared and networked computer systems certain information about users and their activities is visible to others. Users are cautioned that certain accounting and directory information (for example, user names and electronic mail addresses), certain records of file names and executed commands, and information stored in public areas, are not private. Nonetheless, such unsecured information about other users must not be manipulated in ways that they might reasonably find intrusive; for example, eavesdropping by computer and systematic monitoring of the behavior of others are likely to be considered invasions of privacy that would be cause for disciplinary action. The compilation or redistribution of information from University directories (printed or electronic) is forbidden.

Harvard University Policy on Access to Electronic Information

Effective March 31, 2014, Harvard established a policy that sets out guidelines and processes for University access to user electronic information stored in or transmitted through any University system. This policy applies to all Schools and units of the University. Harvard College students should be aware that this policy applies to them.   

Electronic Communication

Harvard neither sanctions nor censors individual expression of opinion on its systems. The same standards of behavior, however, are expected in the use of electronic mail as in the use of telephones and written and oral communication. Therefore, electronic mail, like telephone messages, must be neither obscene nor harassing (see Harassment and Obscene or Harassing Telephone Calls). Similarly, messages must not misrepresent the identity of the sender and should not be sent as chain letters or “broadcast” indiscriminately to large numbers of individuals. This prohibition includes unauthorized mass electronic mailings. For example, email on a given topic that is sent to large numbers of recipients should in general be directed only to those who have indicated a willingness to receive such email.

Email Accounts

Harvard student email accounts ordinarily will be made inoperable and deleted for those Harvard College or Graduate School of Arts and Sciences students who have been unenrolled for a period exceeding six consecutive terms. Students will be sent a notice to the email account one month prior to the closure, and again ten and five days prior to the closure, so that students may take steps to save any material they want to preserve elsewhere. If a student re-enrolls at a later period, a new student email account will be made available.

Intellectual Property and Copyrighted Materials

Computer programs written as part of one’s academic work should be regarded as literary creations and subject to the same standards of misrepresentation as copied work (see Academic Integrity and Academic Dishonesty). In addition, attempts to duplicate, use, or distribute software or other data without authorization by the owner is prohibited.

All Harvard users must respect the copyrights in works that are accessible through computers connected to the Harvard network. Federal copyright law prohibits the reproduction, distribution, public display, or public performance of copyrighted materials without permission of the copyright owner, unless fair use or another exemption under copyright law applies. In appropriate circumstances, Harvard will terminate the network access of users who are found to have repeatedly infringed the copyrights of others, and may also take disciplinary action.

Information about the application of copyright law to peer-to-peer file sharing of music, movies and other copyrighted works is available at www.dmca.harvard.edu. Students with questions about copyright or this policy are invited to raise those questions with an appropriate Dean, tutor or academic officer.

Harvard University Identification Cards

All students receive a Harvard University Identification Card. ID cards are the property of Harvard University and are intended for University purposes only. The cards are required for admission to most Harvard activities and facilities including libraries, museums, dining halls, athletic buildings, and student residences. Some facilities may also require a sticker for entry. The front of the card and the magnetic stripes on the back, however, must be kept free from stickers.

First-term students should submit an ID card photo using Harvard University’s ID Card Photo Submission Web Application. If a photo is successfully submitted, the Student ID card will be printed. When the first-term students arrive on campus, they must bring government-issued identifications to facilitate photo and identity validation before they can receive their Harvard ID cards. If a photo is not successfully submitted using the ID Card Photo Submission Application, students will receive instructions from their school regarding when and where they will have an opportunity to have their ID card photo taken on campus, as well as when they can receive their Student ID card.

Students will keep their ID card while they are enrolled at Harvard University and are responsible for their ID card and the consequences of its misuse. ID cards are not transferable; students may not allow any other person to use their ID card for any purpose. Students who alter or falsify their ID card or produce or distribute false identification cards of any kind are subject to disciplinary action. Lost cards should be reported immediately through the student’s ID account at the Campus Service Center website or at the Harvard University Campus Service Center, Smith Campus Center 807. There is a replacement fee of $25 every time a replacement card is issued.

Students must present their ID card or otherwise identify themselves upon request to any properly identified employee of the University. Surrendered ID cards will be transmitted immediately to the student’s Resident Dean or other appropriate Dean.

Fire Regulations

Fire alarms, smoke detectors, fire extinguishers, and sprinkler systems have been placed throughout the University for the protection of those who live and work in Harvard’s buildings. Misuse of these systems endangers both life and property and can lead to disciplinary action, including requirement to withdraw, and possible criminal charges. For the same reason, violation of any of the fire safety or fire emergency regulations listed below must be considered a serious offense requiring serious disciplinary action.

  • Any abuse of, or tampering with, fire alarm, smoke detector, sprinkler, or extinguisher systems is strictly forbidden. There is a fine, equal to the cost of replacement, for breaking the glass that covers the lock of a fire alarm. Similarly, there is a fine, equal to the cost of replacement, for any damage to a smoke detector. There is a fine, equal to the cost of replacement, damages, and clean up, for sprinkler activation resulting from negligence. 
  • Emergency exit doors in the Houses or dormitories between adjoining suites may be opened by special arrangement with the building manager and only with written agreement of all occupants of both suites.
  • Emergency exit doors must not be blocked on either side by furniture or obstructions of any kind.
  • Fire escapes are intended only for use in a fire; any other uses are prohibited.
  • Flammable and combustible liquids and flammable gases are not permitted in Houses or dormitories.
  • Falsely pulling any alarm, maliciously setting off a smoke detector alarm, or negligently activating the sprinkler system is illegal and may be punishable by a fine of up to $500 or imprisonment.
  • Corridor and stairwell fire doors must be kept shut at all times.
  • Use of fireplaces is prohibited.

Threats Involving . . .

Threats Involving Deadly Weapons, Explosives, Bombs, Chemical or Biological Agents, or Other Deadly Devices or Substances

The following provision of Massachusetts law concerning certain kinds of threats underscores why such behavior must be treated by the College as an actionable offense:

Whoever willfully communicates or causes to be communicated, either directly or indirectly, orally, in writing, by mail, by use of a telephone or telecommunication device including, but not limited to, electronic mail, Internet communications and facsimile communications, through an electronic communication device or by any other means, a threat: (1) that a firearm, rifle, shotgun, machine gun or assault weapon, as defined in section 121 of chapter 140, an explosive or incendiary device, a dangerous chemical or biological agent, a poison, a harmful radioactive substance or any other device, substance or item capable of causing death, serious bodily injury or substantial property damage, will be used at a place or location, or is present or will be present at a place or location, whether or not the same is in fact used or present; or (2) to hijack an aircraft, ship or common carrier thereby causing anxiety, unrest, fear or personal discomfort to any person or group of persons shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for not more than 20 years or imprisonment in the house of correction for not more than 2 1/2 years, or by fine of not more than $10,000, or by both such fine and imprisonment.

Whoever willfully communicates or causes to be communicated such a threat thereby causing either the evacuation or serious disruption of a school, school related event, school transportation, or a dwelling, building, place of assembly, facility or public transport, or an aircraft, ship or common carrier, or willfully communicates or causes serious public inconvenience or alarm, shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for not less than 3 years nor more than 20 years or imprisonment in the house of correction for not less than 6 months nor more than 2 1/2 years, or by fine of not less than $1,000 nor more than $50,000, or by both such fine and imprisonment.

[Massachusetts General Laws, c. 269 § 14(b)-(c)]

In the event that a student is threatened by any of the means above, contact the HUPD at 617-495-1212.

Firearms, Explosives . . .

Firearms, Explosives, Combustible Fuels, Firecrackers, and Dangerous Weapons

Possession and/or use on University property of firearms or other dangerous weapons (as defined below), or ammunition, explosives, combustible fuels, firecrackers, and potential ingredients thereof is forbidden by University policy. The College may make occasional exceptions, on a case-by-case basis, for students who wish to participate in club sports that involve the use of dangerous weapons (as defined below), but in all such cases advance approval must be obtained from both the HUPD and the Club Sports Office, and the participating students must comply with any and all College rules and requirements for use and storage of the weapons. College rules require, at a minimum, that any weapons shall be stored in a secure place and not in a student’s room. The applicable Massachusetts law is as follows:

For the purpose of this paragraph "firearm" shall mean any pistol, revolver, rifle, or smoothbore arm from which a shot, bullet or pellet can be discharged.

Whoever, not being a law enforcement officer, and notwithstanding any license obtained by the person pursuant to chapter 140, carries on the person a firearm, loaded or unloaded, or other dangerous weapon in any building or on the grounds of any elementary or secondary school, college or university without the written authorization of the board or officer in charge of such elementary or secondary school, college or university shall be punished by a fine of not more than one thousand dollars or by imprisonment for not more than two years, or both. A law enforcement officer may arrest without a warrant and detain a person found carrying a firearm in violation of this paragraph.

Any officer in charge of an elementary or secondary school, college or university or any faculty member or administrative officer of an elementary or secondary school, college or university that fails to report violations of this paragraph shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and punished by a fine of not more than five hundred dollars.

[Massachusetts General Laws, c. 269 § 10(j)]

Under Massachusetts law, the definition of dangerous weapons includes many items designed to do bodily injury:

… any stiletto, dagger or a device or case which enables a knife with a locking blade to be drawn at a locked position, any ballistic knife, or any knife with a detachable blade capable of being propelled by any mechanism, dirk knife, any knife having a double-edged blade, or a switch knife, or any knife having an automatic spring release device by which the blade is released from the handle, having a blade of over one and one half inches, or a slung shot, blowgun, blackjack, metallic knuckles or knuckles of any substance which could be put to the same use with the same or similar effect as metallic knuckles, nunchaku, zoobow, also known as klackers or kung fu sticks, or any similar weapon consisting of two sticks of wood, plastic or metal connected at one end by a length of rope, chain, wire or leather, a shuriken or any similar pointed starlike object intended to injure a person when thrown, or any armband, made with leather which has metallic spikes, points or studs or any similar device made from any other substance or a cestus or similar material weighted with metal or other substance and worn on the hand, or a manrikigusari or similar length of chain having weighted ends…

[Massachusetts General Laws, c. 269 § 10(b)]

Students should recognize that even when they are away from the University, Massachusetts law requires a permit or firearms identification card or compliance with other specialized rules (depending upon the type of weapon) for possession of any firearms. The definition of firearms is broad, and includes pistols or guns operated by air, carbon dioxide, or other gases. Carrying any firearm (even if unloaded) in violation of the law is punishable by imprisonment with a mandatory minimum sentence of eighteen months, which cannot be suspended or reduced. [Massachusetts General Laws, c. 269 § 10(a)]. Students should consult the local police department in the city or town in which they reside if they intend to possess firearms on non-University property, in order to assure strict compliance with the applicable statutes.

Betting and Gambling

Students are advised that many gambling activities are illegal under Massachusetts law. The state may bring a criminal action requiring that the winner of a bet forfeit double the value of the winnings, and anyone who loses money “at cards, dice or other game” may recover the losses from the winner through civil action. Bookmaking is illegal: there are severe penalties, up to a fine of $3,000 and three years in prison, for keeping, occupying, or being found in any place used “for registering bets, or buying or selling [betting] pools, upon the result of a trial contest of skill, speed, or endurance of man, beast, bird, or machine, or upon the result of a game, competition, political nomination, appointment or election.” Use of the telephone or mail for gambling activities is also illegal. Provisions of federal law also govern organized gambling activities. The Cambridge License Commission dictates that under no circumstances are casino nights, Las Vegas nights, or any other type of gambling allowed in the City of Cambridge.

Under NCAA Bylaws, a student athlete who is involved in betting or gambling activities relating to intercollegiate athletics risks loss of eligibility. Students participating in intercollegiate athletics are expected to be familiar with the Harvard University Student-Athlete Handbook, which is distributed by the Department of Athletics.

Hazing

College Policy on Hazing

Students are advised that Massachusetts law expressly prohibits any form of hazing in connection with initiation into a student organization. The relevant statutes are provided below. The law applies to all student groups, whether or not officially recognized, and to practices conducted both on- and off-campus. All such student groups (including not only groups officially recognized by the College but also final clubs, fraternities, sororities, and the like) must provide the Dean of Students Office with contact information for all undergraduate officers and must sign and return to the Dean of Students Office the College’s non-hazing attestation form by September 30.

The term “hazing,” under Massachusetts law, means: “any conduct or method of initiation… which willfully or recklessly endangers the physical or mental health of any student or other person.” The definition specifically includes “whipping, beating, branding, forced calisthenics, exposure to the weather, forced consumption of any food, liquor, beverage, drug or other substance, or any other brutal treatment or forced physical activity which is likely to adversely affect the physical health or safety of any such student or other person, or which subjects such student or other person to extreme mental stress, including extended deprivation of sleep or rest or extended isolation.” [Massachusetts General Laws, c. 269 § 17] Notwithstanding any other provisions of this section to the contrary, consent shall not be available as a defense to any prosecution under this action. The failure to report hazing also is illegal, under Massachusetts law.

Hazing is a crime punishable by fine and/or imprisonment. The Administrative Board of the College will consider all reports of hazing in the normal course of this oversight, taking disciplinary action in appropriate cases, and will report confirmed incidents to appropriate law enforcement officials. Where serious harm, or the potential for serious harm, has come to any person as a result of hazing by members of a student group, whether or not such group is officially recognized by the College (either on-campus or off-campus), and the individual or individuals directly responsible are not identified, the host or hosts of the event or activity will be held personally responsible. If the hosts are not identified, the officers of the organization will be held personally responsible. In considering such cases, the Administrative Board will apply the College’s help-seeking policy (set forth within the section on Drugs and Alcohol, subsection “Disciplinary Action”), and also may consider as mitigating factors with respect to possible disciplinary action the efforts made by the hosts or officers to prevent the harmful or potentially harmful situation, as well as their cooperation with the College’s investigation of the situation. A memorandum detailing the specifics of this law is available in the Office of the Dean of Harvard College (617-495-1558).

Massachusetts Hazing Statute

Section 17. Whoever is a principal organizer or participant in the crime of hazing, as defined herein, shall be punished by a fine of not more than three thousand dollars or by imprisonment in a house of correction for not more than one year, or both such fine and imprisonment.

The term “hazing” as used in this section and in sections eighteen and nineteen, shall mean any conduct or method of initiation into any student organization, whether on public or private property, which wilfully or recklessly endangers the physical or mental health of any student or other person. Such conduct shall include whipping, beating, branding, forced calisthenics, exposure to the weather, forced consumption of any food, liquor, beverage, drug or other substance, or any other brutal treatment or forced physical activity which is likely to adversely affect the physical health or safety of any such student or other person, or which subjects such student or other person to extreme mental stress, including extended deprivation of sleep or rest or extended isolation.

Notwithstanding any other provisions of this section to the contrary, consent shall not be available as a defense to any prosecution under this action.

Section 18. Whoever knows that another person is the victim of hazing as defined in section seventeen and is at the scene of such crime shall, to the extent that such person can do so without danger or peril to himself or others, report such crime to an appropriate law enforcement official as soon as reasonably practicable. Whoever fails to report such crime shall be punished by a fine of not more than one thousand dollars.

Section 19. Each institution of secondary education and each public and private institution of post-secondary education shall issue to every student group, student team or student organization which is part of such institution or is recognized by the institution or permitted by the institution to use its name or facilities or is known by the institution to exist as an unaffiliated student group, student team or student organization, a copy of this section and sections seventeen and eighteen; provided, however, that an institution’s compliance with this section’s requirements that an institution issue copies of this section and sections seventeen and eighteen to unaffiliated student groups, teams or organizations shall not constitute evidence of the institution’s recognition or endorsement of said unaffiliated student groups, teams or organizations.

Each such group, team or organization shall distribute a copy of this section and sections seventeen and eighteen to each of its members, plebes, pledges or applicants for membership. It shall be the duty of each such group, team or organization, acting through its designated officer, to deliver annually, to the institution an attested acknowledgement stating that such group, team or organization has received a copy of this section and said sections seventeen and eighteen, that each of its members, plebes, pledges, or applicants has received a copy of sections seventeen and eighteen, and that such group, team or organization understands and agrees to comply with the provisions of this section and sections seventeen and eighteen.

Each institution of secondary education and each public or private institution of post secondary education shall, at least annually, before or at the start of enrollment, deliver to each person who enrolls as a full time student in such institution a copy of this section and sections seventeen and eighteen.

Each institution of secondary education and each public or private institution of post secondary education shall file, at least annually, a report with the board of higher education and in the case of secondary institutions, the board of education, certifying that such institution has complied with its responsibility to inform student groups, teams or organizations and to notify each full time student enrolled by it of the provisions of this section and sections seventeen and eighteen and also certifying that said institution has adopted a disciplinary policy with regard to the organizers and participants of hazing, and that such policy has been set forth with appropriate emphasis in the student handbook or similar means of communicating the institution’s policies to its students. The board of higher education and, in the case of secondary institutions, the board of education shall promulgate regulations governing the content and frequency of such reports, and shall forthwith report to the attorney general any such institution which fails to make such report.

[Massachusetts General Laws, c. 269 § 17, 18 and 19]

The Administrative Board of Harvard College, The Harvard College Honor Council, and the Student-Faculty Judicial Board

Three Boards exist to hear the cases or requests of Harvard undergraduates. They are overseen by the Office of Academic Integrity and Student Conduct.

  • The Administrative Board reviews all undergraduate records, hears all undergraduate petitions for exceptions to the administrative rules of the College, and handles any undergraduate disciplinary case involving social misconduct for which there is governing faculty legislation and/or for which there is precedent for interpreting and applying the rules and standards of conduct of the College.
  • The Harvard College Honor Council reviews all undergraduate disciplinary cases involving violations of the Honor Code and academic dishonesty.
  • The Student-Faculty Judicial Board handles only disciplinary cases for which there is no clear governing precedent, policy, or Faculty legislation; for which the procedures of the Administrative Board are inappropriate; or the disposition of which will have profound effects on the community in general.

The following is a brief introduction to these Boards. For a more detailed description, students may consult with their Resident Dean or visit the website for the Office of Academic Integrity and Student Conduct.

The Administrative Board of Harvard College

Members of the Administrative Board

Administrative Board Petitions and Cases

Procedures of the Administrative Board

Actions of the Administrative Board

Administrative Board Actions and Letters of Recommendation

Readmission after Requirement to Withdraw for Disciplinary or Academic Reasons

The Administrative Board was established by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences in 1890. The Board’s authority to handle the routine College administrative and disciplinary matters derives directly from the Faculty. All meetings and discussions of the Administrative Board are confidential.

Over its history the Administrative Board has developed procedures and practices to guide its work and decisions. These practices include various opportunities and options to assist students in their transactions with the Board. Among others, these include: a student’s option to appeal; the opportunity to meet personally with a subcommittee of the Board in some disciplinary cases; the option to have present during a personal appearance at the subcommittee meeting an adviser in addition to one’s Resident Dean; the ability to take up very routine matters with the Registrar or House and Dean of Students offices.

Members of the Administrative Board

By design, the members and permanent guests of the Board occupy positions well-suited to understand a student’s petition in light of the College’s standards and rules. Thus, they include both teaching members of the Faculty and several senior administrators. However, the Resident Deans make up the majority of the regular participants of the Administrative Board and together provide students with a direct link to the Board. Students may consult with their Resident Dean about any concerns they have. In addition to academic questions, such as choice of concentration or changes in programs, students frequently raise questions of a more personal nature with their Resident Dean.

Administrative Board Petitions and Cases

The Administrative Board acts on different types of petitions and cases, categorized as routine and special petitions, disciplinary cases involving social misconduct, and academic review. Students may refer to the website for the Administrative Board for more information on the number of petitions and cases, category by category, considered by the Board in the previous five years.

The full Board hears all academic review cases and disciplinary cases involving social misconduct. Violation of the standards of conduct in the community and disruptive behavior are typical of the disciplinary cases it handles. After the close of each term, the Board reviews all unsatisfactory academic records and determines what action, if any, should be taken.

Procedures of the Administrative Board

The Administrative Board decides its cases and petitions according to well-established standards and the specific rules and policies established by the Faculty and the University, taking into account the Board’s understanding of the student’s particular circumstances. All Board actions follow essentially the same procedures.

In arriving at any decision, the Administrative Board pays close attention to the academic and personal growth of the students, both as individuals and as members of a residential academic community. Just as the Board depends heavily on the knowledgeable participation of the Resident Deans, the Board itself may be the single most important resource available to the Resident Deans who routinely assist students with academic and residential matters.

Petitions

Board actions ordinarily begin with a discussion between the student and the Resident Dean. At that time the student and the adviser review the student’s plans or situation and the various options available. Many matters can be resolved through the use of petitions. Some are so common that the College has a standard form by which the student may request (and the Board may take) action; special petitions may require that the student submit a written statement, explaining the particular circumstances of the request. 

Non-peer and peer disputes that do not involve allegations of sexual or gender-based harassment

Disciplinary cases also begin with a conversation between the student, the student's Resident Dean, and the Secretary of the Administrative Board or designee, during which they discuss the incident, the relevant College rules or standards of conduct, and possible courses of action. Since the Board takes great care with disciplinary cases, the initial conversation may lead to several subsequent conversations. For more information on Board procedures visit the website for the Administrative Board.

Once the student and Resident Dean have a sound understanding and description of the incident, they present it to the Board as soon as possible. If it is likely that the Board will take formal disciplinary action, the student may choose to appear before a subcommittee of the Board personally when the case is discussed, and, if so, may choose to have another officer of the University with an appointment in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences attend as the personal adviser. Disciplinary cases in which the facts are in dispute or which require investigation may be referred, at the discretion of the Dean of Harvard College, to a subcommittee of the Administrative Board which may work with the assistance of a fact finder.

A complaint or allegation of wrongdoing against a Harvard undergraduate may be filed in writing with a Resident Dean or the Dean of Harvard College by a member of the Faculty or other officer of the University, or by a staff member, student or other member of the community. The College will decide whether to issue a charge and, if so, against whom and for what. Complaints must ordinarily be brought to the College in a timely manner. The Board typically cannot resolve peer dispute cases in which there is little evidence except the conflicting statements of the principals. Therefore, students are asked to provide as much information as possible to support their allegations. Based on that information and any other information obtained through investigation, the Board will decide whether to issue a charge. If a charge is issued, the investigation will continue further and the Board will decide the case.

The Administrative Board may independently initiate a charge against a student, and usually does so when a student has been charged with a crime in a court of law. When court action is pending or in progress, the Administrative Board may delay or suspend its own review process, in recognition of the student’s criminal defense interests.

Disciplinary cases are ordinarily considered by the Administrative Board as quickly as is reasonably possible, given the Board’s schedule and the need to investigate matters carefully. (The Board does not meet during the summer months.) A disciplinary matter concerning a student on leave of absence will also be handled as quickly as possible, and no student on a leave of absence will be allowed to register until any pending disciplinary matter has been resolved. In the case of alleged serious criminal behavior, the College may place a student involuntarily on a leave of absence. Students are expected to comply with all disciplinary rules from matriculation until the conferring of the degree. A degree will not be granted to a student who is not in good standing or against whom a disciplinary charge is pending.

Sexual or Gender-Based Harassment

Though the Faculty of Arts and Sciences has established Procedures for investigating violations of the University’s Policy on Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment, the College remains responsible for student discipline through the Administrative Board. Any disciplinary proceedings against a College student based on allegations of a violation of the Policy must be conducted in a manner consistent with the University Procedures. The disciplinary procedures that apply to allegations of sexual or gender-based harassment brought against any undergraduate student may be found in full here.

Academic Review

Finally, when the Board reviews all unsatisfactory records at the end of each term and the Resident Deans present each such record with a description of the factors leading to it, these presentations, too, are based on their conversations with the students and usually include supporting or explanatory information from the course instructors or the students’ advisers. 

Reconsideration and Appeals

A student may ask that any decision of the Administrative Board be reconsidered provided that new materially relevant information becomes available or there is reasonable evidence of a procedural error. A student has the option to appeal some disciplinary decisions of the Administrative Board to the Faculty Council. Information on this process may be obtained from the student’s Resident Dean, the Secretary of the Administrative Board (University Hall, Ground Floor North), or the Secretary of the Faculty (University Hall, First Floor South).

Appeals involving cases of sexual or gender-based harassment are described in the University Procedures as well as in the FAS Procedures.

Actions of the Administrative Board

It should be noted that students are considered in good standing when they are not on probation and have not been required to withdraw, dismissed, or expelled from the College for either academic or disciplinary reasons. Warnings and admonitions do not affect a student’s good standing.

In disciplinary cases, if the Board determines that wrongdoing occurred, it may take the following actions:

  1. Warn or Admonish: a reprimand to a student whose behavior violates the rules or standards of conduct of the community. A warning becomes part of the student’s official record, but is not considered a formal disciplinary action.
     
  2. Disciplinary Probation: a strong warning to a student whose conduct gives serious cause for concern. Probation is a formal disciplinary action of the College and becomes part of the student’s official record.

During the period of time (to be specified by the Board) that a student is on probation, any further instance of misconduct will cause the Board seriously to consider requiring the student to withdraw from the College. Students on probation must be especially conscientious about their behavior and responsibilities. If the offense is related to participation in extracurricular activity, the Board may at its discretion restrict such participation; in cases in which management of time appears to contribute to the problem, the Board may require that the student obtain the Board’s permission for participation in each individual activity. The Board may also attach additional requirements to probation. It is the Board’s hope that the structure imposed by probation will help students amend their conduct so as to meet the standards of this community. Failure to do so is a grave matter, ordinarily leading to further disciplinary action, including requirement to withdraw. Students placed on disciplinary probation are ordinarily relieved of probation at the end of a set period of time (specified by the Board in its decision), if they have maintained satisfactory conduct.

Students on probation may not receive a degree until they have been relieved of probation by the Administrative Board.

3.  Requirement to Withdraw for Disciplinary Reasons: action taken in serious disciplinary cases indicating that the student’s behavior is unacceptable in this community. Requirement to withdraw is a formal disciplinary action of the College and becomes part of the student’s official record. Requirement to withdraw ordinarily is effective immediately upon vote of the Administrative Board.

For students who have been required to withdraw, the rules regarding financial aid and financial obligations (room rent, board, etc.) are the same as for undergraduates who go on leave of absence (see Students' Financial Obligations). Students who are required to withdraw from the University are not entitled to an identification card until they have been officially readmitted (see also Harvard University Identification Cards).

A student who is required to withdraw for disciplinary reasons is not in good standing until readmitted, and may not participate in any academic exercises or extracurricular activities. Students may not receive a degree until they have been readmitted to good standing in the College. In order to be readmitted, the student ordinarily must have been away from the College for at least one but ordinarily two or more full terms and must have shown an acceptable record of performance during a substantial period (at least six consecutive months) of regular employment. Employment must be full-time, paid, supervised and evaluated, and not in a business owned or controlled by the student’s family. Without exception, students who have been required to withdraw must petition the Board to be readmitted to the College, and the Board’s decision will depend on its judgment of the student’s readiness to rejoin the College community (see also Readmission after Requirement to Withdraw for Disciplinary or Academic Reasons). A student who has twice been required to withdraw from the College will ordinarily not be readmitted. No student who for disciplinary reasons has been required to withdraw for the second and final time or dismissed from Harvard College may ordinarily enroll in the Harvard Summer School or in the Extension School.

4.  Dismissal: action taken in serious disciplinary cases whereby a student’s connection with the University is ended by vote of the Faculty Council. (The action taken by the Board is a vote of requirement to withdraw with a recommendation to the Faculty Council that the student be dismissed.) Dismissal does not necessarily preclude a student’s return, but readmission is granted rarely and only by vote of the Faculty Council. A dismissed student is not in good standing until readmitted.

5.  Expulsion: the most extreme disciplinary action possible. It signifies that the student is no longer welcome in the community. Expulsion must be voted by the Faculty Council. (The action taken by the Board is a vote of requirement to withdraw with a recommendation to the Faculty Council that the student be expelled.) A student who is expelled can never be readmitted and restored to good standing.

In cases of academic review the Administrative Board can take any of the following actions:

1.  Academic Probation: a serious warning to a student whose academic performance for the term is unsatisfactory. Academic probation is a formal action of the Administrative Board and becomes part of the student’s official record.

During the time that a student is on academic probation, any further instance of unsatisfactory academic progress will cause the Administrative Board to give serious consideration to requiring the student to withdraw from the College, ordinarily for two terms. A student on probation must attend all classes and be especially conscientious about all academic responsibilities. If the unsatisfactory academic record is related to participation in extracurricular activity, the Administrative Board may at its discretion restrict participation; in cases in which management of time appears to be the problem, the Administrative Board may require the student to obtain the Board’s permission for participation in each individual extracurricular activity. The Board may also attach additional requirements to probation. It is the hope of the Administrative Board that the structure imposed by probation will help the student resume satisfactory progress toward the degree. Failure of the student to do so is a grave matter and will ordinarily result in requirement to withdraw.

A student placed on probation for academic reasons is relieved of probation at the end of the next completed term if the record is satisfactory (including the passing of at least three courses). Students on probation may not receive a degree until they have been relieved of probation by the Administrative Board.

2.  Requirement to Withdraw for Academic Reasons: action that may be taken in the following circumstances reflecting the Board’s judgment that the record indicates that the student should be given time to reassess academic goals and plans:

  • in the case of a student who has failed to have a satisfactory record for two consecutive terms;
  • at any return of grades in the case of any student, whether or not previously on probation, whose record fails to meet the minimum requirements (see also Minimum Requirements);
  • in the case of serious neglect of work followed by an unsatisfactory record in any term, even though the student has met the minimum requirements.
  • Requirement to withdraw for academic reasons is a formal action of the College and becomes part of the student’s official record.

Students who have been required to withdraw for academic reasons should consult closely with their Resident Dean regarding financial aid and financial obligations (room rent, board, etc.), which vary in certain respects from the obligations for undergraduates who go on leave of absence or who are required to withdraw for disciplinary reasons. Students who are required to withdraw from the University are not entitled to an identification card until they have officially been readmitted (see also Harvard University Identification Cards). 

A student who is required to withdraw for academic reasons is not in good standing, and may not participate in any academic exercises or extracurricular activities. Students may not receive a degree until they have been readmitted to good standing in the College. At the end of the period of withdrawal, the student may be readmitted on (academic) probation, and relieved of (academic) probation at the end of that term provided the record is satisfactory (including the passing of at least three courses). In order to be readmitted, the student ordinarily must have been away from the College for at least one but ordinarily two or more full terms and must have shown an acceptable record of performance during a substantial period (at least six consecutive months) of full-time paid employment. Employment must be full-time, paid, supervised, and evaluated, and not in a business owned or controlled by the student’s family.

Without exception, students who have been required to withdraw must petition the Board to be readmitted to the College, and the Board’s decision will depend on its judgment of the student’s readiness to rejoin the College community (see also Readmission after Requirement to Withdraw for Disciplinary or Academic Reasons). A student who has twice been required to withdraw from the College will ordinarily not be readmitted. Although Exclusion from a Course is an action the Board will have taken prior to academic review, such evidence of neglect of work resulting in a failing grade weighs heavily in the Board’s consideration of and response to unsatisfactory records.

Should a first unsatisfactory record result from especially compelling and well-documented extenuating circumstances, the Board could decide to Take No Action and warn students about their academic record instead of placing them on academic probation. However, an unsatisfactory record remains so regardless of the action taken by the Board. Therefore all students who have an unsatisfactory record must take care to ensure that they earn all satisfactory grades during their next term in the College or a second unsatisfactory record may result in a requirement to withdraw.

Administrative Board Actions and Letters of Recommendation

The Administrative Board has adopted the following policy with regard to recommendations for students that are provided on behalf of Harvard College.

  1. Resident Deans and those acting on their behalf will answer honestly and fully all questions asked of them on admissions and fellowship applications.
  2. Resident Deans and those acting on their behalf will advise students of their responsibility to answer honestly and fully all questions asked on admissions and fellowship applications.
  3. Any requirement to withdraw for academic reasons must always be mentioned in all recommendations for students provided on behalf of Harvard College.
  4. Any requirement to withdraw or probation for disciplinary reasons must always be mentioned in all recommendations for students provided on behalf of Harvard College.
  5. Resident Deans and those acting on their behalf will amend any letters of recommendation provided on behalf of Harvard College to reflect any change in a student’s status.
  6. Every recommendation mentioning one or more actions taken for disciplinary or academic reasons will state that doing so is mandated by College policy. The letters will place such actions in the context of the student’s overall undergraduate experience at Harvard.
  7. If a disciplinary matter is pending at the time a letter of recommendation is prepared, the letter will state that a disciplinary matter is pending, and that this is being reported as a matter of College policy.

Readmission after Requirement to Withdraw for Disciplinary or Academic Reasons

Students who have been required to withdraw will be readmitted only if they can present convincing evidence that they are likely to achieve good standing with respect to both their academic record and conduct if given a second opportunity to study at Harvard. In all such cases the student must petition the Administrative Board to be readmitted to the College, and the Board’s decision will depend on its judgment of the student’s readiness to resume studies and to rejoin the College community.

Students required to withdraw should not assume that readmission is automatic. Rather, they must fulfill to the satisfaction of the Administrative Board the Faculty’s and the Board’s minimum requirements for readmission listed below, and they must also meet any special requirements set by the Administrative Board or Honor Council and described in the letter sent them by the Resident Dean when they were required to withdraw. Examples of such additional, special requirements are (1) a specified level of achievement in a session of the Harvard Summer School, and (2) more than two terms spent away from the College and the Harvard campus. In certain cases, a student may also be requested to consult with Harvard University Health Services prior to return. The Administrative Board will not ordinarily approve the return of a student for the fall term whose experience in the Harvard Summer School in the previous summer has been unsuccessful or unsatisfactory. If students are in any doubt as to the requirements for their readmission following a requirement to withdraw, it is their responsibility to contact the Resident Dean for clarification.

Students request readmission through their Resident Dean, who present the students’ petitions to the Administrative Board. A petition for readmission is not normally considered before December or May prior to the term for which readmission is sought, and the petition must ordinarily be filed at least twelve weeks in advance of the beginning of the term for which the student seeks readmission. Earlier deadlines for housing and financial aid applications will pertain even though petitions for readmission cannot be considered before December or May.

Minimum general prerequisites for readmission are:

  1. A specified period of time (at the very least, one full term) spent away from Harvard College and University property.
  2. Both residence and employment away from the Harvard campus for the period of withdrawal prior to readmission unless other arrangements have been specially approved in advance by the Administrative Board.
  3. An acceptable record of performance for a minimum of six months of continuous, regular, full-time paid employment at one non-academic job, with a suitable letter of recommendation from the employer or employment supervisor.
  4. A satisfactory standard of conduct during the period since the student was required to withdraw.
  5. Indication that the student has an understanding of the reasons for previous difficulties in the College, particularly those related to the requirement to withdraw.
  6. Assurance that the student has adequate motivation for resuming academic work and an appropriate program of study in mind.

Note: Students who through their own decision or action of the Administrative Board have been away from College for five or more years must petition the Board for permission to register. Those planning to return to the College after an absence of five or more years will not ordinarily be eligible for scholarship aid from institutional sources. Petitions to return after an interval of five or more years must include evidence of financial resources necessary to meet all College expenses.

 

Admission Materials

Occasionally candidates for admission make inaccurate or incomplete statements or submit false materials in connection with their applications. In most cases, these misrepresentations or omissions are discovered during the admission process and the application is rejected. If a misrepresentation or omission is discovered after a student has registered, or registered and completed courses, the offer of admission ordinarily will be rescinded, the course credit and grades will be revoked, and the student will be required to leave the College. If discovery occurs after a degree has been awarded, the offer of admission ordinarily will be rescinded, and the course credit, grades, and degree will be revoked. Such cases may be referred to the Committee on Admissions and Financial Aid rather than to the Administrative Board of Harvard College.

The Student-Faculty Judicial Board

In 1987, recognizing that there are some issues that the Administrative Board’s standard procedures could not address appropriately, the Faculty established the Student-Faculty Judicial Board to hear those disciplinary cases for which there is no clear Faculty legislation or accepted precedent within this community for response. The Judicial Board hears only disciplinary cases and has no authority over administrative petitions or academic review. It uses the same range of sanctions employed by the Administrative Board. Students may get more information about the Judicial Board from the Resident Dean or the Faculty of Arts and Sciences pamphlet, Student-Faculty Judicial Board, available from the Office of the Secretary of the Faculty, University Hall, Ground Floor.

Members of the Judicial Board

As with the Administrative Board, the membership of the Judicial Board reflects its mission: since decisions of this Board will become touchstones of community standards, the membership represents the community at large. Thus, the Judicial Board has twelve voting members—six faculty members and six students—who are chosen by lot according to guidelines ensuring the diversity and distribution of membership. In addition, the Dean of Harvard College and the Administrative Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences are ex officio nonvoting members.

The Harvard College Honor Council

Members of the Honor Council

Honor Council Cases

Procedures of the Honor Council

Actions of the Honor Council

Reconsideration and Appeals

Readmission after Requirement to Withdraw for Disciplinary or Academic Reasons

Honor Council Actions and Letters of Recommendation

The Harvard College Honor Council was established by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences in 2014. The Council’s authority to handle all undergraduate disciplinary cases involving the Honor Code and rules on Academic Integrity and Academic Dishonesty derive directly from the Faculty. All meetings and discussions of the Honor Council are confidential.

It is the policy of the Faculty that while evaluation of academic work is entirely in the hands of the instructor, questions of academic honesty are adjudicated by the Honor Council. Students have a right to expect that grading will not be used as punishment for alleged academic dishonesty that has not been confirmed by the Honor Council. Students may ask the Council, through their Resident Dean, to investigate and resolve informal allegations of academic dishonesty that have not been brought to the Council’s attention by a faculty member.

Members of the Honor Council

The Honor Council is made up of an equal number of Harvard College undergraduates and FAS Faculty members, administrators, and GSAS teaching fellows.  Members are selected to represent the academic community as broadly as possible.

Honor Council Cases

The Honor Council handles disciplinary cases that stem from a potential violation of the Honor Code or rules on Academic Integrity and Academic Dishonesty. These include potential plagiarism, inappropriate collaboration, exam cheating and copying, and other violations of the Honor Code or rules on Academic Integrity and Academic Dishonesty.

Concerns about violations of the Honor Code or rules on Academic Integrity and Academic Dishonesty may be referred to the Council by any member of the community, including an undergraduate student, member of the Faculty, other officer of the University, staff member, or other community member. A complaint or charge can be made in writing directly to the Honor Council or to the Resident Dean or the Dean of Harvard College.  All complaints must be referred to the Honor Council.

If it is determined that a potential disciplinary matter is most appropriately handled by the course, the Council may return the case to the course for Local Sanctions. Please see Actions of the Council for a more complete explanation of Local Sanctions

Cases involving violation of the Honor Code or rules on Academic Integrity and Academic Dishonesty are ordinarily handled by the Honor Council as quickly as is reasonably possible, given the Council’s schedule and the need to investigate matters carefully. (The Council does not meet during the summer.) A disciplinary matter concerning a student on leave of absence will also be handled as quickly as possible, and no student on a leave of absence will be allowed to register until any pending disciplinary matter has been resolved. In the case of alleged serious criminal behavior, the College may place a student involuntarily on a leave of absence. Students are expected to comply with all disciplinary rules from matriculation until the conferring of the degree. A degree will not be granted to a student who is not in good standing or against whom a disciplinary charge is pending.

Procedures of the Honor Council

The Honor Council publishes its procedures to provide members of the Harvard College community with a guide to its work. Those procedures are presented on the Honor Council’s website.

Actions of the Honor Council

In making a decision, the Council is guided by the educational development of the student and the standards of the academic community as set forth in the Honor Code. It should be noted that students are considered in good standing when they are not on probation and have not been required to withdraw, dismissed, or expelled from the College for either academic or disciplinary reasons. Warnings and admonitions do not affect a student’s good standing.

If the Council determines that the Honor Code or rules on Academic Integrity and Academic Dishonesty have been violated, it may take the following actions:

1.   Warn or Admonish: a reprimand to a student whose behavior violates the rules or standards of conduct of the community. A warning becomes part of the student’s official record, but is not considered a formal disciplinary action.

2.   Exclusion from a Course: a notation of EXLD on the transcript, indicating that the student was not permitted to continue in the course and received no credit. Exclusion from a course is equivalent in all respects to failing it and in and of itself makes the student's record for the term unsatisfactory.

3.  Referral for Local Sanctions: a referral to the faculty member teaching the course in which the finding of academic dishonesty was made with a recommendation that "local sanctions" (for example: mandatory tutoring, a course warning, an ungraded rework of the assignment in question, a grade penalty, or a failure for the assignment) are appropriate. Such sanctions will be imposed at the discretion of the faculty member in consultation with the Council.

4.  Disciplinary Probation: a strong warning to a student whose conduct gives serious cause for concern. Probation is a formal disciplinary action of the College and becomes part of the student’s official record.

During the period of time (to be specified by the Council) that a student is on probation, any further instance of misconduct will cause the Council or Administrative Board seriously to consider requiring the student to withdraw from the College. Students on probation must be especially conscientious about their behavior and responsibilities. If the offense is related to participation in extracurricular activity, the Council may at its discretion restrict such participation; in cases in which management of time appears to contribute to the problem, the Council may require that the student obtain the Council’s permission for participation in each individual activity. The Council may also attach additional requirements to probation.

It is the Council’s hope that the structure imposed by probation will help students adjust their conduct so as to meet the standards of the Honor Code and the community. Failure to do so is a grave matter, ordinarily leading to further disciplinary action, including requirement to withdraw. A student placed on disciplinary probation is relieved of probation by petitioning the Council at the end of the probationary period. For the petitioning procedures, please see the Honor Council website

Students on probation may not receive a degree until they have been relieved of probation by the Council.

5.  Requirement to Withdraw for Disciplinary Reasons: action taken in serious disciplinary cases indicating that the student’s behavior is unacceptable in this community. Requirement to withdraw is a formal disciplinary action of the College and becomes part of the student’s official record. Requirement to withdraw ordinarily is effective immediately upon vote of the Honor Council.

For students who have been required to withdraw, the rules regarding financial aid and financial obligations (room rent, board, etc.) are the same as for undergraduates who go on leave of absence (see Students' Financial Obligations). Students who are required to withdraw from the University are not entitled to an identification card until they have been officially readmitted (see also Harvard University Identification Cards).

A student who is required to withdraw for disciplinary reasons is not in good standing until readmitted, and may not participate in any academic exercises or extracurricular activities. Students may not receive a degree until they have been readmitted to good standing in the College. In order to be readmitted, the student ordinarily must have been away from the College for at least one but ordinarily two or more full terms and must have shown an acceptable record of performance during a substantial period (at least six consecutive months) of regular employment. Employment must be full-time, paid, supervised and evaluated, and not in a business owned or controlled by the student’s family. Without exception, students who have been required to withdraw must petition the Administrative Board to be readmitted to the College, and the Board’s decision will depend on its judgment of the student’s readiness to rejoin the College community (see also Readmission after Requirement to Withdraw for Disciplinary or Academic Reasons). Students who are petitioning for readmission should consult closely with their Resident Dean, who will bring the student’s petition to the Administrative Board. A student who has twice been required to withdraw from the College will ordinarily not be readmitted. No student who for disciplinary reasons has been required to withdraw for the second and final time or dismissed from Harvard College may ordinarily enroll in the Harvard Summer School or in the Extension School.

6.  Dismissal: action taken in serious disciplinary cases whereby a student’s connection with the University is ended by vote of the Faculty Council. (The action taken by the Honor Council is a vote of requirement to withdraw with a recommendation to the Faculty Council that the student be dismissed.) Dismissal does not necessarily preclude a student’s return, but readmission is granted rarely and only by vote of the Faculty Council. A dismissed student is not in good standing until readmitted.

7.  Expulsion: the most extreme disciplinary action possible. It signifies that the student is no longer welcome in the community. Expulsion must be voted by the Faculty Council. (The action taken by the Honor Council is a vote of requirement to withdraw with a recommendation to the Faculty Council that the student be expelled.) A student who is expelled can never be readmitted and restored to good standing.

Reconsideration and Appeals

Students may request that their case be reconsidered provided that new materially relevant information becomes available or there is reasonable evidence of a procedural error. A student has the option to appeal some disciplinary decisions of the Honor Council to the Faculty Council. Information on this process may be obtained from the student’s Resident Dean, the Office of Academic Integrity and Student Conduct (University Hall, Ground Floor), or the Secretary of the Faculty (University Hall, First Floor).

Readmission after Requirement to Withdraw by the Honor Council for Disciplinary Reason

Without exception, students who have been required to withdraw must petition the Administrative Board to be readmitted to the College, and the Board’s decision will depend on its judgment of the student’s readiness to rejoin the College community (see also Readmission after Requirement to Withdraw for Disciplinary or Academic Reasons). Students who are petitioning for readmission should consult closely with their Resident Dean, who will bring the student’s petition to the Administrative Board.

Honor Council Actions and Letters of Recommendation

The Honor Council has adopted the following policy with regard to recommendations for students that are provided on behalf of Harvard College.

  1. Resident Deans and those acting on their behalf will answer honestly and fully all questions asked of them on admissions and fellowship applications.
  2. Resident Deans and those acting on their behalf will advise students of their responsibility to answer honestly and fully all questions asked on admissions and fellowship applications.
  3. Any requirement to withdraw or probation for disciplinary reasons must always be mentioned in all recommendations for students provided on behalf of Harvard College.
  4. Resident Deans and those acting on their behalf will amend any letters of recommendation provided on behalf of Harvard College to reflect any change in a student’s status.
  5. Every recommendation mentioning one or more actions taken for disciplinary reasons will state that doing so is mandated by College policy. The letters will place such actions in the context of the student’s overall undergraduate experience at Harvard.
  6. If a disciplinary matter is pending at the time a letter of recommendation is prepared, the letter will state that a disciplinary matter is pending, and that this is being reported as a matter of College policy. 

Life in the Harvard Community

Residential Life

Dean of Students Office
6 Prescott Street
dso.college.harvard.edu
Tel: 617-495-1558; Fax: 617-495-1719
Mon.–Fri., 9 am–5 pm

The Dean of Students Office aims to promote a living-learning community that supports the intellectual and effective growth of Harvard undergraduates. The office also provides housing forms and information about all undergraduate housing, and administers system-wide policies and procedures related to housing.

 

On-Campus Housing

On-Campus Housing: The System and Assignments

All first-year students are assigned to dormitories by the Dean of Students Office, First Year Experience, during the summer months prior to their enrollment. They live in one of seventeen dormitories in or near Harvard Yard and take their meals in Annenberg Hall. The dormitories are divided into four areas, each headed by a Resident Dean of First-Year Students. These Deans, each with a staff of two senior proctors and several resident proctors, oversee the academic progress and personal welfare of the students in their area.

Each spring, current first-year students are assigned to one of the twelve residential Houses by a random lottery system. The features of the process are publicized well in advance of the lottery’s administration by the Dean of Students Office, Housing and Residential Life, 6 Prescott Street.

Resident upperclassmen live in one of the twelve residential Houses. The House System is the product of the vision of Abbott Lawrence Lowell, president of Harvard from 1909 to 1933, and is based on the model of Oxford and Cambridge Colleges. Each House accommodates 360-490 students and has a dining hall, common rooms, and facilities for academic, recreational, and cultural activities. Faculty Deans are responsible for the overall management and wellbeing of the House community. As members of its Senior Common Room, each House also has an Allston Burr Resident Dean, faculty associates, tutors, and affiliates, some of whom reside in the House. Students with questions about the tutors’ roles should consult the job descriptions in the House Offices. A program of seminars, social service activities, plays, concerts, lectures, special dinners and parties is sponsored by each House. Houses also field a variety of sports teams that compete in an intramural program. In effect, each House forms a small academic and social community within the larger context of the College and University. A thirteenth entity, the Dudley Community, serves non-resident students, Dudley Co-op students and Visiting Undergraduate Students, and staffed by an Allston Burr Assistant Dean and tutors. It provides recreational and social opportunities as well as specialized support for off-campus issues.

House affiliation and residence for transfer students are determined by a random lottery prior to the student’s arrival.

Housing Assignments

The assignment of rooms and roommate groups for first-year students is made by the Dean of Students Office, First Year Experience. Students are notified of these assignments in August. Questions regarding first-year students' room assignment should be directed to the First Year Experience unit in the Dean of Students Office.

Each House determines the procedure for room assignments for the upperclassmen assigned to it. Sophomores beginning residence in a House receive room assignments after rooms are filled by seniors and juniors. Questions regarding room assignments for upperclassmen should be directed to the House Administrator of the appropriate House. A directory of House Administrators can be found here.

Changes in room assignment within a first-year dormitory or within a House must be approved by the appropriate staff. Students must notify their Resident Dean immediately of any change in address.

 

Transferring Between Residential Houses

It is assumed that students will live, for their three upperclass years, in the House to which they are assigned during the Rising Sophomore Lottery.

Occasionally, however, students may seek to transfer to another residential House. Students who started the College as first-year students may transfer after completing two terms of residency in the House to which they were assigned. Students who transferred to Harvard College from other institutions may apply to transfer after one term of residency in the House to which they were assigned. Applications are made in the term prior to when the transfer would take place (e.g., students who want to transfer in the fall apply in the spring). See the Academic Calendar for dates. Requests for an inter-House transfer based on medical reasons are evaluated on an individual basis throughout the year. Transfers between Houses for medical reasons are rare and all such petitions must be directed to the Accessible Education Office (AEO).

Students may transfer residence from the House to which they have been assigned only through the regular transfer process or by having a medical petition approved.

 

Housing for Students Requiring Accommodation

Accommodations can be made for students with disabilities and/or medical conditions. Students requiring assistance need to communicate directly with the Accessible Education Office (AEO) immediately following admission, or as soon as the need is established. In addition, students bringing medical equipment should inform the AEO to ensure that adequate electrical or other considerations are made.  Clinical documentation provided to the Accessible Education Office (AEO) is always necessary to request housing accommodations. Specific guidelines for such documentation may be obtained from the AEO website. The University reserves the right to change a pre-existing housing assignment, even temporarily, if a disability-related concern exists.

 

Religious Accommodation Requests

Students needing alternate access to the Houses for religious reasons should reach out to the appropriate House Administrator and Building Manager.  Directories for both can be found on the DSO website (https://osl.fas.harvard.edu/building-managers and https://osl.fas.harvard.edu/house-administrators).

 

Gender Inclusive Housing

Gender inclusive housing is an option that allows students to live in a suite with others regardless of their sex or gender identity. All occupants must voluntarily agree to the arrangements and must complete a gender inclusive housing contract confirming their agreement. Any student at the College may request gender inclusive housing, although the process differs for first-year students and students living in the houses.

First-year students who wish to request gender inclusive housing can do so when they fill out the first-year housing application over the summer. For more information, contact the Dean of Students Office (617-495-1574) or the Office of BGLTQ Student Life (617-496-5716).

Sophomores, juniors, and seniors who wish to request gender inclusive housing can do so by speaking with their House Administrator. Fulfillment of requests for gender inclusive housing will take into account the limitations of each House. For more information, students should contact the Housing Office (617-496-2774), their House Administrator, or the Office of BGLTQ Student Life (617-496-5716).

 

Veterans, Married, and Family Student Housing

Harvard College does not offer undergraduate housing in the Houses or dorms to married undergraduates and/or undergraduates with families. However, students who are veterans, married, and/or have children may be eligible for Harvard-affiliated housing through Harvard University Housing (HUH) Given the leasing period for HUH housing, students are strongly encouraged to make such a request during the spring term (between March 1 and May 1) if they are requesting housing for the following academic year. Requests and inquiries related to this policy should be directed to the Director of Housing and Residential Operations (myteveli@fas.harvard.edu).

 

Housing Alternatives

The Dudley Cooperative

Commuters

Students Who Move Off Campus

Visiting Undergraduate Students

Dudley Community

While Harvard College is predominantly residential, some students do not live in College housing. Nonresident students are held to the same standards of conduct required of students living in the Houses and dormitories. They are expected to behave in a mature and responsible manner, and that expectation extends to their academic performance no less than to their social behavior.

The Dudley Cooperative

The Dudley Cooperative provides undergraduates with an alternative to the residential houses. Students live in the two Cooperative Houses located on Massachusetts Avenue and Sacramento Street. The Dudley Co-ops are a small community of 32. Members pay a reduced room rent to the University and are responsible for the room rent until the end of the term even if they move out of the Dudley Cooperative. Members also pay a reduced board fee. The selection, preparation, and quality of food are taken very seriously. Vegetarians are easily accommodated. Dinners are prepared communally; breakfasts and lunches are prepared individually. A number of additional chores are divided among Co-op members such as kitchen and living room cleaning and food buying. Each member of a Co-op spends an average of about six hours per week on these chores. Decisions about the running of the Co-op are made by all of the Co-op members, a practice which helps to foster a supportive and tolerant atmosphere. There are 29 student rooms, two tutor rooms, a large and well-equipped kitchen, and a living room. More information can be obtained from the Dudley Community office.

Commuters

Occasionally, Harvard admits to the first-year class a student who is granted nonresident status at the time of admission. These students are advised in their first year by a Resident Dean of First-Year Students and participate in the activities and social programs of the Yard. These students may choose to live on campus as sophomores and will receive a House assignment from the Rising Sophomore Lottery. Those students who continue to live off campus will affiliate with the Dudley Community.

Students Who Move Off Campus

All upperclassmen who choose to live off campus after having lived in their assigned residential House may choose affiliation with the Dudley Community. or may remain affiliated with their residential House. Choice of affiliation must be indicated on the Housing Contract Cancellation form. This option has appealed to a number of students, including married students, upperclassmen returning from extended leaves of absence, and students who wish to be part of a fully non-residential community.

All first-year students who complete the fall term must enter the Rising Sophomore Lottery to receive a House assignment before requesting approval to live off campus. Should they decide to live off campus in their sophomore year, they will automatically be affiliated with the Dudley Community. Students who elect to live in the Dudley Community are required to affiliate with the Dudley Community.

Visiting Undergraduate Students

Those students who are admitted to Harvard as visitors for a term or a year are admitted as nonresidents, although a small number of beds may be available to these students on a yearly basis under the oversight of the Dudley Community.

Dudley Community

Students who elect membership in the Dudley Community are eligible for partial or full meal contracts and are included in all social and cultural activities sponsored by the Dudley Community. They are advised and supported by the Dudley Assistant Dean and are advised for purposes of fellowship and professional school application by Dudley Community tutors.

 

Policies Governing Enrollment and Residency

Policies Governing Residential Life

Disciplinary Actions

Roommate Rights and Responsibilities

Noise

Guests

Smoking

Obscene or Harassing Telephone Calls

Nonpayment of Telephone Calls

Other Residences

Care of Residential Property

Maintenance and Energy Conservation

Recycling

Resource Conservation

Care of Furnishings and Personal Property 

Security and Access

Health and Safety

Fire Safety Regulations, Instructions, and Procedures

Carbon Monoxide

Storage and Vacate Procedures

Vehicle Registration and General Parking Regulations

Policies Governing Residential Life

Disciplinary Actions

Disciplinary actions within the Houses, the Dudley Community, and dormitories under College supervision include admonition, probation, and requirement to leave the premises. In the latter instance, a written warning will describe what the unacceptable behavior is, the fact that the Faculty Dean, Dudley Community Assistant Dean, or First-Year Experience staff has the right to require the student to leave, and what steps must be taken by the student in order to remain in residence. Should the student be unable or unwilling to take the steps to improve the situation and should the student continue to behave in a manner that is detrimental to the well-being of the residential community, the Faculty Dean, Dudley Community Assistant Dean, or First-Year Experience staff, in consultation with the Dean of the College, may then require the student to leave the premises even though the student may continue to be enrolled in the College. A student required to leave a House, the Dudley Co-op or other Dudley-supervised residence, or dormitory for disciplinary reasons will not ordinarily have the opportunity to return to a College residence.

Roommate Rights and Responsibilities

Personal issues, such as academic stress, alcohol abuse, depression, and eating disorders, may strain relationships in a living situation. It is both a student’s right and a student’s responsibility to seek help when such issues become disruptive.

Studies on alcohol abuse at colleges and universities show that there are significant secondary effects for roommates and friends of those who drink excessively. Roommates and friends report that sometimes they cannot study or sleep because they are worried when a friend gets so drunk that the friend does not return home until the next morning. Roommates often “baby-sit” for those who cannot make wise choices for themselves or who need actual medical help due to intoxication.

Students' concerns about protecting a roommate’s privacy, in this and other instances, should not keep them from getting support personally or for that other person. If a student is worried about a friend, if this concern affects living habits, the student has the right and responsibility to seek help both personally and for that other person. It may be that the student’s action spares the individual painful consequences now or later.

Sources of help:

  • Proctor or Resident Deans of First-Year Students at the Dean of Students Office
  • House resident tutor, Dudley Community tutor or Assistant Dean, Allston Burr Resident Dean, or Faculty Dean 
  • Center for Wellness, 114 Mt. Auburn Street, 7th Floor, 617-495-9629
  • Counseling and Mental Health Services staff, HUHS, Smith Center, Fourth Floor, 617-495-2042
  • Mediation Service, 5 Linden Street, 617-495-2581
  • OSAPR 617-495-9100 (24-hour, confidential hotline)

Noise

Every student is responsible for respectful treatment of neighbors, in the community and in the residences. In addition to students being responsible for the maintenance of good order and reasonable quiet in their room, they are also responsible for maintenance of good order and reasonable quiet in the neighborhoods in and around campus. Students shall at all times show proper regard for others. Voices, radios, televisions, stereos, musical instruments, and other audio equipment shall be adjusted so as not to disturb the community.

Guests

A Harvard student not regularly assigned to a particular dormitory, Dudley residence, or House may not be lodged in that dormitory, residence, or House for more than a brief stay. The consent of other occupants of the room is always required.

Students who wish to have guests who are not Harvard students for more than two nights must first also obtain permission of the Faculty Dean, Dudley Community Assistant Dean, or First-Year Experience staff. The hosts of repeated overnight guests who are not Harvard students must make their guests’ presence known to the Building Manager and security personnel due to safety considerations. The College reserves the right to prohibit overnight guests when issues of security are involved. Food may not be shared with or given to those who are not on a board contract or who have not paid for the meal.

Guest Meals

Guest and inter-House rules for each House are determined by the Faculty Dean and the House Committee. Students may invite members of other Houses for any meal at which guests are allowed. If the guest is “on board,” there will not be a charge, although an HUID must be shown. Guests not on a meal plan or their hosts may pay the transient rates that are posted at the checkers’ desk (cash, BoardPlus and Crimson Cash are accepted for payment).

Food may not be shared with or given to those who are not on a board contract or who have not paid for the meal.

Smoking

Smoking, including vaping, is prohibited in all University buildings. Harvard Yard is tobacco free. This includes, without limitation, in all administrative, academic, and residential buildings and athletic facilities. Smoking is also prohibited within 25 feet of any residential building as well as in any residential courtyard or breezeway. Students who violate this policy may be banned from College housing and also may face disciplinary charges. Harvard University Health Services provides education and assistance to students who wish to stop smoking. Students may contact Harvard University Health Services, Center for Wellness at 617-495-9629 for further information.

Obscene or Harassing Telephone Calls

The placement of an obscene or harassing telephone call is a criminal offense, punishable to the full extent of the law in the courts. It is treated as a serious disciplinary issue within the College.

Information from the Harvard Police is available in the Dean of Students Office and the House Offices for anyone receiving such a call.

Nonpayment of Telephone Bills

For calls other than Centrex and 911, telephone service may be deactivated for accounts that have payments overdue by sixty days or more. It is not possible for the University to deliver messages to students whose service has been disconnected. In response to the concerns of parents who may attempt to call a telephone number that has been temporarily disconnected, the University will inform them that the line has been disconnected for nonpayment and advise them to use an alternate means of communication. Life or death emergencies will be referred to the Harvard Police Department. The University does not allow a student to graduate until all indebtedness is satisfied.

Other Residences

Because College housing is limited, students may not hold a room in a House, Dudley residence, or dormitory during term time if it is not their main residence for that period.

Care of Residential Property

As part of the care of the buildings under College supervision, students must observe the following specific regulations.

  1. Residents are responsible for reporting in writing any damages to their suite (beyond normal wear and tear) to their Building Manager within one week following registration. Any unreported damages found in the suite after this time will be assumed to be the responsibility of the current residents of the suite and they will be term billed to pay for the cost of any repairs. Residents are not permitted to paint their rooms or suites. Students will be charged on their term bill for the full cost to repaint a suite to its original color. Depending on the color and type of paint used, the cost can exceed $200 per wall.
  2. While decorating their rooms students must be careful not to attach anything to the walls or to other surfaces in a way that causes damage or leaves any marks. Upon request, the Building Manager will provide students with molding hooks, or an adhesive gum (e.g., Hold-it). Students are advised that use of any other methods (tape, tacks, nails, hooks, etc.) will result in a charge on the term bill.
  3. The installation of any temporary room partition must conform with the regulations outlined in the Office of Physical Resources student room partition policy and be specifically authorized by the Building Manager. Unauthorized partitions will be removed immediately and the students responsible will be term billed for the cost of removal and any related damage.
  4. Rooms will be inspected periodically during the year and at the end of each academic year. Charges will be levied for violations of rules and repair, including removal of excess trash and scrubbing of heavily soiled walls and floors; these charges will be added to the occupants’ term bill. If in the course of performing inspections, repairs or maintenance in a student suite a staff member comes across a prohibited cooking appliance or other safety hazard, the staff member will report the item to the Building Manager. The Building Manager will provide the student with notice of the violation and re-inspect the room within two weeks’ time. If the violation remains in the student room, the Building Manager will remove and dispose of the offending appliance or materials.

Maintenance and Energy Conservation

All building maintenance problems should be reported to the Building Manager’s office for the House or dormitory. If there is a security guard on duty in the House when the problem occurs, the security guard should be notified. After hours, and if the Building Manager is not available, or in cases of serious emergency, the problem should be reported to the Harvard Control Center at 617-495-5560.

All students are urged to be especially mindful of energy consumption as energy costs are a significant portion of annual room fees. The following simple actions will reduce energy consumption: using computer power management software and turning off computers when not in use; turning off lights and other appliances when last to leave a room; closing windows and storm windows during cold weather; moving furniture away from radiators and adjusting the radiator (most radiators in Houses have adjustable valves that allow control of the level of heat in the room) to a comfortable temperature. Occupants should never turn radiator valves all the way to the “off” position or leave windows open during cold weather, since they may be held responsible if pipes freeze because of these actions.

Rooms in the Houses or dormitories that are overheated or unusually cold should be brought to the attention of the Building Manager so that the necessary alterations can be made by Facilities Maintenance. Space heaters are prohibited without the permission of the Building Manager since they are fire hazards and expensive to operate.

Recycling

Recycling is mandatory in Cambridge. Students must bring all trash and recyclables to the designated recycling area in each House, Dudley residence, or dormitory, and should do so regularly throughout the term. Materials should be sorted into trash, mixed paper, commingled container, and battery receptacles. Composting is recommended and encouraged in dormitories.

  • Mixed paper includes newspapers, magazines, phone books, white and colored office paper, junk mail with window envelopes, paper with metal staples or spiral bindings, paper with small bits of adhesive tape and flattened cardboard. The mixed paper bag or barrel should not contain food wrappers, tissues, cups, pizza boxes, plastic wrappers, or trash. Please make a dedicated effort to reuse and recycle paper, as paper is a major component of University waste.
  • Commingled containers include cans, jars, cardboard beverage containers and bottles made of glass, metal, or plastic. All caps and lids should be discarded, and containers should be emptied and rinsed before they are deposited in the receptacles. Liquids remaining in containers significantly complicate recycling and waste disposal.
  • Batteries of any kind, including those for laptops, cordless phones, pagers, radios, Walk-mans, etc. must be recovered for safe disposal. In the Yard, batteries can be left at the battery recycling bin in each trash/recycling room. In the Houses, batteries can be left at the Building Manager’s office.

In addition to recycling, students are encouraged to reduce waste by purchasing and printing carefully and reusing paper, mugs, furnishings, and other equipment. Direct benefits of recycling to students include contributing to University financial savings which can be translated into student programs, raising Harvard’s standing in national recycling competitions, forming sound habits for the future, and contributing to a cleaner and healthier world.

For questions about recycling and waste reduction please call the University Operations Services Recycling Hotline at 617-495-3042 or refer to the University Operations Services Recycling & Solid Waste Removal website

Resource Conservation

Undergraduates play a key role in University efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and move toward an environmentally sustainable campus. Student cooperation and leadership in areas of energy use reduction, solid waste reduction and recycling has and will continue to help further FAS environmental stewardship goals for Houses, Dudley residences, and dorms.

Undergraduates in residence are urged to integrate resource efficiency and environmental responsibility into their daily life in the Houses and dormitories. Above-mentioned expectations include: recycling all recyclable containers and papers; properly disposing of toxic materials such as batteries; reporting leaks immediately; turning off lights and appliances when not in use; and reducing heat waste in the winter. Other community standards include: using computer power management software; purchasing energy-efficient appliances; taking only as much food as one will eat in the dining hall; and using warm or cold water rather than hot for most laundry loads. Consult the Harvard Green Campus Initiative for further information on campus greening activities.

Questions about recycling may be addressed to the University Operations Recycling Hotline at 617-495-3042.

Care of Furnishings and Personal Property

  1. Students are responsible for all University furniture provided in their rooms or apartments. If students in the Houses or Dudley residences decide not to use some pieces of furniture, they must store them within the building at the direction of the House Building Manager. All first-year dormitory furniture must remain in suites unless approved by the Accessible Education Office. Please note that in the renovated Houses, furniture storage outside of the student suite is no longer available. Any unwanted furniture items must remain in the student suite. In the DeWolfe Street buildings, furniture storage is not available. Written instructions about the process will be made available during move-in. Students are also responsible for returning any stored pieces to the room before they vacate it. Failure to do so will result in a moving fee.
  2. Students may obtain a bed board (plywood for under mattress) for health or comfort from the House Building Manager or Dorm Crew. The student must sign a form agreeing to be charged the cost of replacing the bed board if it is not returned by the end of the academic year. Bedrails are not provided but bedding/linens for added protection can be purchased online or at retail stores.
  3. Waterbeds are prohibited in College buildings.
  4. Furnishings for the House, Dudley residence, and dormitory common areas may not be removed for students’ personal use. Building Managers will remove such furnishings from student rooms when found. Students will be assessed the cost of removing the articles, and the incident may be brought to the attention of the Administrative Board for appropriate disciplinary action.
  5. Students who bring articles of personal property onto the premises of the University do so at their own risk. The University assumes no responsibility and shall not be liable for any articles, including mail or parcels sent to students that are damaged, lost, stolen, or left behind after vacating. The University urges students to leave valuables at home or to obtain appropriate property insurance. The University recommends obtaining private insurance if your belongings are not covered by your family’s homeowner’s or renter’s insurance policy. You may contact the Office of Risk Management for advice regarding insurance options available to Harvard students.
    Retrieval of personal property (jewelry, contact lenses, etc.) from sink, shower, toilet and bathroom drains is the financial responsibility of the student requesting retrieval. The student will be term billed $75 for the cost of the plumber’s time necessary to retrieve the object. This charge applies even if the plumber is unable to retrieve the lost item.
  6. Students must maintain their personal furnishings in a decent state of repair, and remove them from the suite at the time of vacating. Any furnishings that might cause a fire hazard or injury to the cleaning staff must be removed on request.
  7. Students may keep refrigerators in their rooms for personal use if the units meet the following specifications: dimensions not to exceed 36” high x 24” wide x 24” deep; weight not greater than 85 lbs. Building Managers will have a list of some models meeting the guidelines.
  8. It is the students’ responsibility to supply their own telephone equipment, or to rent such at the time they apply for service. All suites are equipped with jacks that accommodate the modern plug-in (modular) cords. Some first-year dormitories now have centrally located emergency call boxes.
  9. Bicycle racks are provided for active use, not for long-term storage. Bicycles left on racks for extended periods of time, or which appear to be unusable may be removed from bike racks. Check with your Building Manager or Quad Bikes for availability of seasonal storage.

Security and Access

For the protection of students, their belongings, and University property, doors must be locked at all times. Students are reminded to always lock their doors even if leaving their room for a moment, never prop open doors, never leave their key in the lock or near the door, never allow visitors to “piggyback” with them when entering their residence hall, request that visitors identify themselves prior to opening the door, and never leave notes indicating one’s absence. Additional crime prevention tips can be found at the HUPD Website. Students are encouraged to call the HUPD at 617-495-1212 if they observe someone acting in a suspicious manner.

Students will be asked to sign a receipt for the coded keys issued for their House or dormitory and, when applicable, their mailbox. Students are responsible for returning these keys, ordinarily in an envelope provided at the time they give up occupancy. Students must request replacements for lost keys from the Building Manager. Each replacement during the term costs $20. A $50 charge is assessed for each key not returned in the manner detailed above when a student vacates a room or suite.

When students lose their keys along with some form of identification, the lock to their suite will ordinarily be changed as soon as it is feasible to do so. An exception will be made in those cases where there is no possibility that the keys can be retrieved. Students will be charged a fee of $150 for the lock change. For those students residing in DeWolfe apartments, these charges will be assessed by Harvard University Housing.

The University must have access to all student suites and the rooms within them. Therefore, students are forbidden to install locks or any other security device (e.g., slide bolts, drop chains, hook and eyes) to any doors of their suite.

Unauthorized or inappropriate possession of any key or passkey, reproduction of any key or passkey, or interference with locks or other security devices is prohibited and makes a student liable to disciplinary action by the Administrative Board and/or criminal prosecution.

Health and Safety

  1. In accordance with College fire safety policy, cooking appliances are prohibited in any room or apartment not equipped with kitchen facilities. One exception to this rule is made for the product called Micro-Fridge, which can be purchased from the manufacturer website or rented through Harvard Student Agencies (HSA). Models 2.3 MF4-7DI, 2.3 MF4-7DIS and 2.3 MF4 – 7DIW are all permitted in student rooms.
  2. No student may keep an animal in a building owned or leased by the College with the exception of approved service or assistance animals.
  3. Trash must be placed at all times in appropriate containers. Students are required to dispose of their trash according to the particular guidelines established for each residential building by the Building Manager and the Custodial Division.
  4. No chemicals, solvents, grease, paint, or toxic or hazardous substances may be disposed of in the sink, toilet, or shower drains. Students must contact the House Building Manager regarding proper disposal of such items.
  5. Students are not allowed on the roofs or any roofing surfaces of any building.
  6. Students are not allowed on fire escapes except in the case of fire or other emergency.
  7. Occupants of rooms must not place objects, including, but not limited to antennae, satellite dishes, or plants on outside walls, window sills, window frames, roofs, fire escapes, or ledges. Decorations are ordinarily not permitted on the outside of buildings. Exceptions require the approval of the respective Faculty Dean, Dudley Community Assistant Dean, or First-Year Experience staff and Building Manager.
  8. Students may use electrical devices, such as hairdryers and electric razors, only if they comply with the standards of the National Electrical Code, Underwriters Laboratories, and Massachusetts laws and regulations, and are not cooking appliances, as stated in item 1 above.
    1. Appliances must not be connected to light sockets.
    2. Do not daisy chain or plug multiple outlet strip plugs or surge protectors together.
    3. No spliced cords are allowed.
    4. Extension cords and stereo speaker wiring must be in good condition and of adequate wire gauge.
    5. Extension cords and stereo speaker wiring must not be attached to wall or floor surfaces, run through doorways or partitions, or be covered by rugs.
  9. Refrigerators may not be installed in closets or bathrooms or covered with blankets or tablecloths. Cords for refrigerators must comply with item 8 above.
  10. The House Building Manager may request inspection by Facilities Maintenance electricians of any electrical device brought to the College. Should Facilities Maintenance declare the device unsafe for any reason, it must be removed immediately from College housing.
  11. The installation of air conditioners is forbidden without the written approval of the Accessible Education Office.
  12. Students may use equipment for capturing direct broadcast satellite signals only if the installation of these devices does not cause damage to College-owned property and if the installation is performed in accordance with items 5, 6, and 7 above. External antennae, dishes, etc. are prohibited. Students with questions should consult the appropriate Building Manager or the manager of First-Year Dormitories.
  13. All halogen floor lamps are prohibited.
  14. Service should be called for all pest control issues. Do not use chemicals or sprays.

Students are urged to be thoroughly familiar with Fire Safety Regulations, Instructions, and Procedures below.

    Fire Safety Regulations, Instructions, and Procedures

    Fire: 911
    University Police: 617-495-1212

    Regulations

    A student who violates any of the fire safety regulations (see Fire Regulations) or the fire emergency procedures below, including those pertaining to the abuse of fire alarm, smoke detector, sprinkler, or fire extinguisher systems, will be subject to disciplinary action, including requirement to withdraw.

    Fire Emergency Procedures

    Any smoke detector in a stairwell or corridor can initiate a general alarm when a predetermined concentration of smoke reaches it. This alarm has the same sound as the alarms initiated manually and is a signal to leave the building. Each room or suite is typically equipped with a 110-volt AC smoke detector. If activated, the alarm sounds in that room only. Additionally, all of the dorms and Houses are equipped with sprinkler systems, which, if activated, produce 18-25 gallons of water per minute. If there is a fire, go to the nearest exit, pull the fire alarm at the pull station, and leave the building.

    If You Find a Fire

    1. Sound the alarm by activating the nearest fire alarm pull station and call the Fire Department at 911 from a safe location. You can also call 617-495-5560, the University Operations Center, who will notify the Fire Department, HUPD, a University fire safety mechanic, the Building Manager, and other key personnel.
    2. Alert your neighbors only if you can do so without delaying your exit.
    3. Leave the building immediately, close doors behind you as you exit the building and proceed to the designated emergency evacuation meeting location.
    4. If you have information on how the fire started or how the alarm was activated, report it to the Fire Department.

    Do not try to put out the fire. Use your common sense. Your safety is more important than property.

    If the Alarm Sounds

    Do not delay evacuation or assume that this is a false alarm. Immediately begin to exit the building.

    1. Feel the door. If it is hot, do not open it. Stay in your room. Put a towel or blanket (preferably wet) under the door to keep the smoke out. If your telephone works, call the Cambridge Fire Department at 911. Also call the Harvard University Police Department at 617-495-1212 to let them know where you are. Attract attention to yourself. Hang a sheet or something out the window.
    2. If the door is not hot, open it slowly. If smoke and heat fill the hall, close the door, stay in your room, and call for help.
    3. If you can safely leave your room, take your key and close your door behind you. Exit by the nearest clear exit stairway. Do not use the elevator – it may fail in a fire or be automatically recalled to the ground floor. Failure to leave when an alarm sounds, unless there are safety reasons for not doing so, is a punishable offense.
    4. If you encounter smoke on your way out, stay low and crawl if necessary. You are more apt to find breathable air close to the floor. Cover your nose and mouth with a wet towel or wet handkerchief, if possible.
    5. So that you may be accounted for, go to the predetermined emergency evacuation meeting location.
    6. Do not attempt to reenter the building until the Fire Department gives permission to do so.

    Fire Safety Instructions

    1. Combustible materials are not allowed in hallways or stairwells, including welcome mats outside suite doors.
    2. Do not overload wiring. Appliances should be plugged into wall outlets, never connected to light sockets. Extension cords should be Underwriters Laboratories or National Electric Code approved cords in good condition and of proper rating. Do not splice extension cords; never run them through doorways or partitions, or cover them with rugs.
    3. Use fireproof draperies. Limit the number of flammable decorations and keep your room neat and clean. Draperies are not allowed in first-year dormitories.
    4. The use of candles and other sources of open flame is prohibited in House, Dudley residence, and dormitory rooms. Any candles found during room inspections will be confiscated. Menorahs may be lit only in House common areas and only with the approval of the Faculty Dean or Dudley Assistant Dean. They must always be attended.
    5. It is illegal to use fireplaces, as they can present a safety hazard to all occupants.
    6. Cooking equipment is prohibited. The City of Cambridge forbids cooking in any room or apartment not equipped with permanent cooking facilities.
    7. Know emergency escape routes: fire doors, window exits, and fire escapes. Never block emergency escape routes or block open or prop open any fire doors. Emergency exit doors within rooms/suites shall not be blocked on either side by furniture or obstructions of any kind.
    8. Student participation in annual fire drills is mandatory.
    9. If you have information on the cause of a fire alarm activation, report information to tutors, proctors, Faculty Deans, Dudley Assistant Dean, Resident Deans, or the Fire Department representatives.

    For further information, contact the Department of Environmental Health and Safety, 46 Blackstone Street, Cambridge, 617-495-2060, or visit their fire safety website

    Carbon Monoxide

    Select rooms may be equipped with carbon monoxide detectors. Carbon monoxide (CO) is an invisible, odorless, tasteless and non-irritating gas created when fuels (e.g. gasoline, propane, natural gas, oil, and wood) are burned. Improperly vented appliances used for heating and cooking can be sources of carbon monoxide. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts requires residential buildings with carbon monoxide-generating appliances to be equipped with carbon monoxide detection devices and alarms.

    Common symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are headaches, runny nose, sore eyes, and are often described as “flu-like symptoms.” Higher-level exposure symptoms may include dizziness, drowsiness, and vomiting. Extreme exposure to carbon monoxide can result in unconsciousness or death.

    Carbon Monoxide Alarm Instructions

    The carbon monoxide alarm will sound four quick “chirps” every few seconds, indicating that carbon monoxide is present.

    1. Everyone in the immediate area of the alarm must immediately move to fresh air outdoors. If anyone is experiencing symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning, call 911 or Harvard University Police Department, 617-495-1212.
    2. If there are no symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning, call the University Operations Center, 617-495-5560, for instructions and assistance. Remain outside until directed by the Police or Fire Department that it is safe to re-enter the building.

    Storage and Vacate Procedures

    1. Bicycles may be stored in the Houses and dormitories only within guidelines established by each appropriate Building Manager. In no case may a bicycle obstruct a corridor, stairway, or path of emergency exit.
    2. Motorcycles or scooters are not allowed in any College building.
    3. Students who take a leave of absence or are required to withdraw may not store any belongings with the University.
    4. Graduating seniors must remove all personal belongings by the date established by the College administration. For seniors graduating in May this will ordinarily mean by 5 pm of the Friday following Commencement. Any belongings left after that time will be disposed of by the University.
    5. Students living in the Houses or dormitories who are leaving in the spring and intending to return to residence in the fall may store belongings in designated areas during the summer on a space available basis.
      1. Please Note: Storage is not available in every House, and students should check with the House Building Manager to learn if storage is available in their particular House.*
      2. In those Houses where summer storage is available, the amount of storage space varies considerably, as does the number of boxes and/or pieces of furniture that students are permitted to store. Students may not store their belongings in a House other than their own. Students assume the risk for all items stored at the University. Since the University will not be responsible for any loss, theft or damage, students are strongly urged not to store items of significant value, important class notes, etc., or to insure them if they must leave them. Students are not permitted to store items that are banned from use in the Houses and dormitories such as halogen lamps, microwave ovens and any other cooking appliances. Per order of the City of Cambridge Fire Department, no items may be stored in basement hallways, stairwells, or any other emergency egress route. Items left in any of these areas will be disposed of immediately.
      3. No storage is available for students who live within 150 miles of the College.
    6. There will be no access to stored belongings until the Houses officially open in the fall, with the single exception of students attending Harvard Summer School. Stored articles will be held until the Course Registration deadline (except in designated areas that must be cleared by the Course Registration deadline). Stored articles that are not removed by the appropriate date will be considered abandoned. The University will then donate the items to charity, sell them, or use them for House purposes.
    7. Students moving out of College housing must remove all personal belongings at the time of departure. Rented refrigerators must be returned to the rental agency before the student leaves. All trash must be removed. The cost of removing excess trash, disposing of abandoned furniture and belongings, and performing extraordinary cleaning of rooms after students’ departure will be charged to departing occupants.

    * Houses undergoing renewal will provide students with new common room furniture and will create new social spaces in rooms formerly used for storage, and so will no longer be able to offer storage to their residents. 

    Vehicle Registration and General Parking Regulations

    Harvard University is very well served by public transportation, allowing access to South Station, Logan International Airport, downtown Cambridge and Boston, and most points of interest. For information on public transportation, walking, bicycling and bike and car share programs visit the CommuterChoice Program website.

    Students who bring their vehicles to school are required to register their cars with Parking Services. The University assumes no responsibility for damages to any vehicle or its contents for reason of fire, theft, vandalism, or other cause.

    Campus Service Center

    Monday through Friday, 8 am–5 pm

    8th Floor, Smith Campus Center, 1350 Massachusetts Avenue

    Tel: 617-496-7827; Fax: 617-496-8278
    Email: parking@harvard.edu
    www.transportation.harvard.edu/parking/students-tenants

    All vehicles parked on Harvard University property require a valid parking permit. Students who purchase permits are permitted to park only in those areas officially assigned by Parking Services. Students must comply with all University parking regulations. These parking regulations are in effect at all times including nights, weekends, and holidays. All vehicles in violation of University parking regulations are subject to ticketing and/or towing.

    On-street Cambridge parking is reserved for city residents with Massachusetts vehicle registrations. For more information on resident stickers, please visit the City of Cambridge website or call 617-349-4700.

    Undergraduates living on-campus may purchase a permit to park at the One Western Avenue Garage. Commuter parking is available at the One Western Avenue Garage on a space-available basis. Applications are available to students during registration in the fall.

    Nonresident Student Driver Statements and Decals

    State law requires Harvard to post the following notice to all students who are not Massachusetts residents:

    “IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR A NONRESIDENT STUDENT TO FAIL TO FILE A NONRESIDENT DRIVER STATEMENT WITH THE POLICE DEPARTMENT LOCATED IN THE SAME CITY OR TOWN AS THE SCHOOL OF COLLEGE ATTENDED, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 3 OF CHAPTER 90 OF THE MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL LAWS. FAILURE TO FILE SUCH STATEMENT IS PUNISHABLE BY A FINE NOT TO EXCEED $200.”

    Under Massachusetts law, if out-of-state students bring cars to campus but elect not to register them with the Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles, then they must file a nonresident driver statement with the local police department, whether or not they apply for on-campus parking. Shortly after filing the nonresident driver statement with the Cambridge/Boston [as applicable] Police Department, students will receive a nonresident student driver decal from the University Parking Office. This decal must be prominently displayed in the uppermost center portion of the vehicle’s windshield.

    Harvard Parking Permit Policies

    In order to register for parking, all students requesting parking must provide the following information:

    1. A valid Harvard ID, or a driver’s license with proof of University affiliation
    2. Proof of residency (e.g., lease or housing agreement with the student’s name and address on it)
    3. Vehicle registration, which clearly states the student’s, parent’s, or spouse’s name.  If the last name on the registration does not match student’s last name, please be prepared to show documentation stating legal connection with the vehicle (insurance papers stating student’s name and the vehicle plate, etc.)

    It is the responsibility of the student operating a motor vehicle at the University to inform Parking Services of any vehicle change or registration change made during the academic year. For the most current information on parking types and rates, please visit the Parking Services student website. All garage occupancy is on a first-come, first-served basis. There are no assigned spaces in the student garages. Priority will be given to students living in Harvard-affiliated housing.

    To effect cancellation and receive a credit, a student must return the issued hang tag and access credentials (e.g., transponders) to the Campus Service Center at 8th Floor, Smith Campus Center, 1350 Massachusetts Avenue during regular business hours. Failure to return the hang tag and access credentials will result in accrual of parking fees.

    All student yearly parking will be prorated on a monthly basis. Please note that parking hang tags and access credentials are non-transferable.

    Tickets, Penalties, and Appeals

    All vehicles not displaying a valid Harvard University parking permit are subject to ticketing and/or towing without notice and at the owner’s risk and expense.

    A student will be held responsible for any violation incidental to the operation of the vehicle, no matter who the driver may be. Citations will be issued for the following parking offenses: safety violations, regulatory violations, or violations of accessible parking accommodations.

    Anyone wishing to appeal a parking violation must do so in writing within 21 days of receiving the violation notice. Appeals can be submitted online through the new eBusiness portal or sent directly to the Campus Service Center at the 8th Floor, Smith Campus Center, 1350 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138.

    Citations can also be paid online through the eBusiness portal or by check made payable to Harvard University within 21 days of violation notice issue; a late charge will be applied to all violations not paid within that period. Unpaid violations will be added to the student’s term bill.

    When an unauthorized vehicle is towed, a citation along with a tow fee is accrued. Students whose cars are towed must pick up their claim checks and pay their fines at the Campus Service Center during regular business hours or at the Harvard University Police Department, 1033 Massachusetts Avenue, after hours.

    Accessible Parking

    All parking policy and parking requests based on disability are managed jointly by the University Disability Services (UDS) and Parking Services. Each school has a Local Disability Coordinator, and students with specific needs should first contact the Local Disability Coordinator at their school. Students needing contact information for their school's Local Disability Coordinator should contact UDS at 617-495-1859 (voice) or by email at disabilityservices@harvard.edu. The Local Disability Coordinator will request any medical documentation or other verification of disability or injury that may be necessary prior to the authorization of parking or shuttle services. Students who require accessible parking as a reasonable accommodation will not be required to pay more than the yearly student rate for comparable parking types (taking into account hours of access and the nature of the parking facility), regardless of whether such students are assigned to a lot or garage generally reserved for faculty or staff.

    Visitor Parking

    Visitor permits for select campus lots may be purchased at the Campus Service Center, 8th Floor, Smith Campus Center, 1350 Massachusetts Avenue, Monday through Friday, during regular business hours. Permits may also be purchased via the Online Permit Purchase System. After-hours visitors can pay and park at the Harvard Business School. Please visit the Parking Services visitor website for the most current visitor parking rates. Parking at all visitor lots is issued on a space-available basis.

     

    Missing Persons Policy

    As required under federal law, Harvard College immediately will refer to the Harvard University Police Department any missing persons report involving a student who lives in on-campus housing.  If any member of the Harvard community has reason to believe that a student who resides in on-campus housing is missing, the member should immediately notify HUPD at 617-495-1212.  If HUPD determines that the student has been missing for more than 24 hours, then, within the 24 hours following this determination, the School or HUPD will:

    (1) notify an appropriate external law enforcement agency, unless the local law enforcement agency was the entity that made the determination that the student is missing;
    (2) contact anyone the student has identified as a missing person contact under the procedures described below; and
    (3) notify others at the University, as appropriate, about the student’s disappearance. In addition to identifying a general emergency contact person, students residing in on-campus housing have the option to identify confidentially a separate person to be contacted by Harvard in the event that the student is determined to be missing for more than 24 hours.

    Students are not required to designate a separate individual for this purpose and if they choose not to do so then Harvard will assume that they have chosen to treat their general emergency contact as their missing person contact.  Students who wish to identify a confidential missing person contact should notify the Registrar.  A student’s confidential missing person contact information will be accessible only by authorized campus officials and by law enforcement in the course of an investigation, and may not be disclosed outside of a missing person investigation.  In addition, if it has been determined that a student who is under 18 years of age and not emancipated has been missing for more than 24 hours, then the School or HUPD will contact that student’s custodial parent or guardian, in addition to contacting any additional contact person designated by the student.  Students are reminded that they must provide the Registrar with emergency contact information and/or confidential missing person contact information if they have not already done so.

     

    Housing Policies and Deadlines

    Housing Policy

    Those Who Will Ordinarily Be Housed

    Those Who Will Be Housed on a Space-Available Basis Only

    Housing Contract

    Summer Occupancy of the Houses

    Occupancy of the Dorms and Houses between Fall and Spring Terms

    Housing Policy

    All first-year students are required to live on campus. Most upperclassmen also live in College housing; those who choose to live elsewhere must submit the Housing Contract Cancellation form via the Residential Portal. Please be sure to check the Dean of Students Office residential fees webpage for housing cancellation related fees.

    All students living in College dormitories and Houses are required to purchase full-board contracts and be familiar with the undergraduate housing license contract. Below is information about applying for and canceling housing:

    1. At the beginning of their residence in the College, all students are required to sign a Housing Contract in the student residential portal. This contract remains binding for all the terms a student is in residence, and is cancelled by graduation or by the submission of a Housing Contract Cancellation form. It is renewed by the timely submission of a Returning Student Housing Application.
    2. Students who are on a leave of absence or required to withdraw and intend to return to College Houses must notify the Dean of Students Office of their intention to return by completing the Returning Student Housing Application via the Residential Portal by the dates given below. A student who has filed an application to return to residential housing for one term and subsequently decides to return for the following term must submit a new Housing Contract Cancellation Form and a new Returning Student Housing Application via the Residential Portal by the dates below.
    3. Students who, while registered, have lived off-campus by choice and wish to return to their previous House of affiliation must submit a Returning Student Housing Application via the Residential Portal to the Dean of Students Office by the dates given below:

    Deadlines

    Consequences of Failure to Notify

    October 18 - if student is returning for the spring term

    Student will be housed on a space-available basis only, and ineligible to apply for an inter-house transfer or enter a housing lottery.

    February 10 - if student is returning for the fall term

    4.   All students who decide not to live in College housing, whether or not they are currently registered and whether or not they have signed a Housing Contract, must inform the Dean of Students Office of their intent by completing a Housing Contract Cancellation form via the Residential Portal by the dates given below. See Students Who Move Off-campus.

    Deadlines

    Cancellation Fee

    May 20 - if not taking up residence for the fall term 2019

    For cancellation fees, please see the Financial Obligations chart and/or the Dean of Students Office residential fees website.

    November 11 - if not taking up residence for the spring term 2020

    5.   A student may leave the House system and/or the College during the academic year to take a leave of absence or move off-campus. Please refer to the chart Students' Financial Obligations for detailed information about payment in the event of a leave or move off-campus.

    Those Who Will Ordinarily Be Housed

    1. Students currently registered in the College and living in a residential House or first-year dormitory who have signed a Housing Contract by the deadline.
    2. Students on a leave of absence who have filed a Returning Student Housing Application.
    3. Students currently registered in the College who by choice are living for at least one term off-campus and who wish to return to their House of previous residence. A Returning Student Application must be filed by the appropriate deadlines.

    Those Who Will Be Housed On a Space-Available Basis Only

    Students who submit the Returning Student Housing Application after the appropriate deadline will be placed on their House’s Space Available Wait List. Students should consult the House Administrator for space availability.

    Housing Contract

    STUDENT HOUSING LICENSE
    HOUSING AND RESIDENTIAL LIFE
    DEAN OF STUDENTS OFFICE
    HARVARD COLLEGE

    Licensee First Name: Licensee Last Name:
    HUID #: Class Year:
    Dorm: Suite Assignment:

    I, the undersigned Licensee, hereby accept from Harvard University a license to occupy, in accordance with and subject to the Harvard College Handbook for Students, other established rules and policies of the University, and the conditions set forth on this page, the living Quarters specified above or any other Quarters to which I may be at any time assigned (the “Quarters”), to be occupied only by me and such other persons as are from time to time assigned to the Quarters. I understand that this license shall apply for any and all periods during which that I am in residence at Harvard College. For this license, I hereby agree to pay to the University an undergraduate room/student services fee as indicated in the Harvard College Handbook for Students for the academic year. And I hereby agree to be bound by and to comply with all such regulations, rules, usages, and conditions.

    I shall have no interest or estate in the land, but only a license to occupy the Quarters assigned to me. The right to occupy the Quarters shall automatically terminate upon my ceasing for any reason to be a full-time registered undergraduate student pursuing a course of instruction at Harvard University, in which case the fee shall be prorated in accordance with the University’s policy then in effect.

    Licensee Signature: Date:

    CONDITIONS

    One-half of the fee shall be due with the first term bill for the fall term and one-half of the fee shall be due with the first term bill for the spring term (unless Licensee uses another University approved payment plan). Licensee will be liable for the fee for an entire academic year, unless the University terminates the license. The University may cancel this license and reassign the Quarters if (before the course registration deadline for upperclass students, before Registration for First-Year Students) for the applicable term Licensee has not started or resumed his or her occupancy of if Licensee has been granted permission to live off-campus, in either of which case there may be a cancellation fee of up to one-quarter of the fee for the term.

    The University reserves the right to terminate this license for any cause it deems reasonable (including without limitation when Licensee’s conduct jeopardizes his or her welfare or the welfare of the community), making an appropriate adjustment of the fee. The University may also reassign Licensee to other Quarters at any time.

    The University shall be under no obligation to furnish heat for the Quarters during any academic vacation. If Licensee chooses to occupy and receives permission from the House Office or Dean of Students Office to occupy the Quarters during any such vacation, then any temporary source of heat utilized by Licensee must be first inspected and approved by the University. Licensee shall have no right to occupy the Quarters between the spring and fall terms and no storage for personal property shall be provided in the building(s) in which the Quarters are located.

    The University shall not be liable for any inconvenience, loss, or damage caused by insufficiency of heat or irregularity in the supply of electric current, or for the loss or theft of or damage to any property of Licensee or Licensee’s visitors, wherever situated. Each occupant of the Quarters is responsible for the care of University property in the Quarters, and the cost of loss or damage will be assessed to Licensee and student(s) judged by University officials to be responsible. All occupants of a suite or room may be held jointly responsible for any loss or damage to the suite or room. Licensee also shares with other residents joint responsibility for the common areas of the suite, floor, entry, residence hall, or other common facilities and may be subject to joint assessment in the event loss or damage to such areas where University officials conclude that individual responsibility cannot be established. A degree will not be granted to Licensee until such assessments are paid in full.

    The University reserves the right to enter the Quarters at times it deems reasonable for standards of safety and/or building maintenance. For routine inspections, students will ordinarily be notified in advance by the Building Manager.

    The Licensee may not share or otherwise allow use of University identification or Keys to the Quarters with any other person(s). The Quarters may not be “sub-licensed” in any manner.

    Summer Occupancy of the Houses

    Individual students may not reside in the Houses during the summer unless enrolled in programs conducted by the Summer School or another College-affiliated program.

    Occupancy of the Dorms and Houses between Fall and Spring Terms

    Students are expected to leave at the end of the fall term and not return to campus until the Houses and dorms reopen at the start of the spring term. During the first part of this period, from December 20, 2019 through January 2, 2020, Harvard College will be closed. Thereafter, from January 2 through January 17, only students with a recognized and pre-approved need to be on campus will be permitted to return to College housing. All students continuing on for the spring 2020 term may move back to campus on January 17, 2020.

     

    Financial Obligations

    A student’s total financial obligation in the event of a leave of absence, requirement to withdraw, or move off-campus, can be determined from the chart below and in Tuition and Fees. In addition to the cancellation fee, room and board charges are prorated and continue to the day a student leaves College residence. During the academic year, cancellation of room and board charges is contingent upon submitting the proper paperwork to the Dean of Students Office. Students who move off-campus during the academic year must submit the proper paperwork via the online Residential Portal to the Dean of Students Office; however, the complete Student Services fee continues to be assessed. For students who do not fall into one of the above categories (i.e., a leave of absence, requirement to withdraw, or move off-campus) but who are absent from Cambridge for whatever reason, room and board charges continue to be assessed through the end of the term. When a student moves into on-campus housing from off-campus during the academic year, room rent and board charges will be assessed from the day the student takes up residence in the College. Full board charges are prorated to the day that the student moves on campus.

    Housing Cancellation Fees

    Because of student feedback that cancellation fee deadlines were confusing and did not align with other deadlines, we have adjusted our fee schedule starting with the Fall Term 2018.

    Fall Term 2019
    On or before May 20, 2019 $0
    May 21, 2019 - June 17, 2019 $200
    June 18, 2019 - July 15, 2019 $300
    July 16, 2019 - August 12, 2019 $400
    August 13, 2019 - September 10, 2019 $500
    September 11, 2019 - December 3, 2019 $58.75/per diem
    After December 3, 2019 $5,463.50
     
    Spring Term 2020
    On or before November 11, 2019 $0
    November 12, 2019 - November 30, 2019 $200
    December 1, 2019 - December 22, 2019 $300
    December 23, 2019 - January 13, 2020 $400
    January 14, 2020 - February 5, 2020 $500
    February 6, 2020 - May 1, 2020 $58.75/per diem
    After May 1, 2020 $5,463.50

    (*The per diem charge is calculated based on the number of days from the first day of classes until the day you move out and return your key. Dudley co-op students will continue to pay the $500 cancellation fee until the per-diem rate breaks even with the $500 fee and is approximately 70% of the usual house rate).

    We are unable to waive cancellation fees except in the most extraordinary circumstances. Per the Harvard College Handbook for Students: "Fees for late housing cancellation, late check-in, late course registration, and change-of-course petitions are waived only when the University is responsible for the difficulty or when the situation involves a serious illness of the student (usually including hospitalization) or a death in the student’s immediate family" (https://handbook.fas.harvard.edu/book/late-fees).

    Students are encouraged to cancel their housing as soon as possible so that students can be taken off the wait list and so that houses can plan lottery and room assignments accordingly.

     

    Effect of Health Issues

    Effect of Health Issues on Dormitory or House Residence

    Responsibilities of Health and Counseling Services

    College Responsibilities

    Procedure for Notice and Consultation

    As a residential college, Harvard takes seriously its obligation to support the well-being of all its students. This charge involves not only meeting to the greatest degree possible the needs of students whose continued residence may require reasonable accommodations in physical space or other arrangements, but also safeguarding the right of all community members to be free from undue disruption in their academic and residential lives. In a residential college, an individual student’s medical illness or behavioral difficulties affect not only the individual, but also may affect others in the community. How these issues may affect a student’s enrollment is discussed elsewhere in this Handbook (see Involuntary Leave of Absence). The principles of consultation outlined here are based on the central importance of preserving suitable living arrangements for all residents, while recognizing that each situation is unique, and that fundamental principles, rather than ironclad rules, must govern consultation and decision-making on residential life.

    Responsibilities of Health and Counseling Services

    Medical care and medical decision-making are the province of clinicians. Thus, in consultation with patients, clinicians recommend hospitalization, arrange procedures, prescribe medications, conduct psychological evaluations, and recommend and implement ongoing treatment. Harvard University Health Services (HUHS) preserves the rights to privacy and confidentiality of students under its care, communicating with others about students only with those students’ knowledge and consent, except as noted elsewhere (see Confidentiality and Consent).

    In addition to providing student health and counseling services, HUHS also acts occasionally as consultants to the College, advising College officers about individual students’ needs, ordinarily with students’ full knowledge and consent. Two situations that routinely call for close coordination and consultation between HUHS and the College involve relief or accommodations for students experiencing difficulties, and leave of absence considerations. A student with a medical illness or exhibiting behavior that affects functioning may need professional evaluation of the condition to determine the appropriateness of temporary or ongoing arrangements, relief or exception to academic requirements, or accommodations, until adequate functioning is restored. In response to a request from a student’s Resident Dean or the Accessible Education Office (AEO), HUHS clinicians may evaluate a student’s condition and make recommendations to the College. In making such recommendations, HUHS clinicians will not ordinarily disclose information they know independently about a student’s medical or mental health condition without the student’s consent and, in all cases, will not disclose information about the student that is not relevant to the recommendations. 

    College Responsibilities

    The College, in consultation with the affected student, determines whether an injured or ill student, or a student exhibiting disruptive behavior, may continue in residence, and whether the student may return to residence after a short or longer-term absence due to accident, illness, or behavioral disturbance. In situations where a student’s medical illness or behavioral disturbance raises concerns about the practicality and appropriateness of the student's residence in a dormitory or House, the College values the expert advice of HUHS and AEO in reaching its informed decision on the student’s remaining in or returning to the College residence.

    Questions about a student’s residence (as opposed to enrollment) most often arise after a significant illness or injury that requires short or longer-term follow-up care, but may also be prompted by situations in which a student seriously disrupts others in the residential community, or requires sustained services or monitoring beyond the capacity of a college to provide or beyond the standard of care that can be expected of a college health service. Such situations include—but are not limited to—the following:

    • any head injury;
    • any injury or illness that affects vision, hearing, speech, memory, balance, physical mobility, or manual dexterity;
    • any illness for which treatment includes medications not readily self-administered, or requiring special equipment for self-administration (IVs, for example);
    • any physical or mental illness whose behavioral manifestations have significantly affected roommates or others in the community, or pose a threat to the individual or community safety as assessed by HUHS clinicians;
    • any condition which requires frequent professional crisis intervention.

    In such circumstances, students may not require hospitalization for clinical reasons, but the level of care and accommodation essential to their stabilization may exceed the physical resources or the appropriate staffing responsibilities of a residential college and/or the standard of care that a college health service can be expected to provide.

    Procedure for Notice and Consultation

    In such circumstances, officers of the College will consult with clinicians at HUHS or, if the student has been treated elsewhere, clinicians at other facilities or in private practice, ordinarily with the student’s permission.  Depending on all of the relevant circumstances, such consultation may be initiated either by appropriate officers of the College or by clinicians at HUHS. Notice by HUHS that a student has been hospitalized or treated in an emergency department of an area hospital may prompt the College to begin a process of consultation, through which it will decide whether and under what circumstances the student may continue in or return to dormitory or House residence (see Confidentiality and Consent). The College may also independently decide that, based on its observations or other information it has about a student, it should initiate the process of consultation with HUHS clinicians, and ascertain whether that student has been hospitalized or treated by an emergency department. Consultation will be focused upon general information regarding concerns raised by the student’s condition or behavior and requirements for continued care, in order to facilitate the College’s decision about the student’s capacity to maintain residence. Neither the student’s medical nor mental health record will be available to officers of the College. College officers, who may consult with other affected students and responsible staff (only as necessary and in accordance with respect for the individual student’s right to privacy), will then determine whether it is appropriate for the student to continue in or return to residence.

    An important consideration in the College’s decision whether a student may continue in or return to residence is the impact of the student’s presence on the community. The College regards as unreasonable the expectation that roommates, suitemates, friends, or residential staff will take on health-care responsibilities for other students. Therefore, the College will consider unacceptable any return-to-residence plan that requires other students to monitor a student’s condition or provide care.

    Any student may refuse to allow consultation between their clinician(s) and officers of the College, but a refusal to allow consultation will not prevent the College from meeting its obligation to reach a decision regarding a student’s return to or continuation in residence. In some circumstances, the level of care recommended by clinicians may cause the College temporarily to change a student’s place of residence or to deny residence, if in the judgment of College officers necessary and recommended care cannot appropriately be provided in a student residential setting or is beyond the capacity and purpose of the College to provide. Since appropriate residential accommodations and follow-up treatment take time to arrange, students who have been hospitalized should expect that consultation between clinicians and officers of the College will need to occur at least twenty-four hours prior to a student’s anticipated return to residence. Both clinicians and College officers will make every effort to resolve questions promptly and, in case of disagreement, to discuss issues immediately and openly with the affected student. Ordinarily, consultation will occur between the student’s attending clinician and the relevant HUHS clinician coordinating the case and the student’s Resident Dean. In the event of disagreement,that HUHS clinician, the Resident Dean, or the student, may ask that the appropriate Chief of Service at HUHS, the Dean of Students, or another senior College official designated by the Dean of Harvard College be involved. While HUHS clinicians and officers of the College will endeavor to respect the wishes of students regarding treatment recommendations and residential arrangements, the final determination about residence in Harvard housing will rest with the Dean of Harvard College.

    Clearance for Return

    Clearance for Return to Residence and/or Continued Enrollment and Participation in Harvard-Related Programs or Activities

    After a hospitalization or emergency room visit by one of its students, Harvard College ordinarily will not permit that student to return to residence or participation in any Harvard-related programs or activities, without making its own assessment of the suitability of the student’s return. (See Procedure for Notice and Consultation in Effects of Health Issues on Dormitory or House Residence.)

    To better inform that assessment, students are expected to notify Harvard University Health Services (HUHS) of any hospitalization or emergency department visit. HUHS can be notified by phone 24 hours a day and 7 days a week at 617-495-5711.

    Reason for Policy

    An important consideration in the College’s decision whether a student may continue in or return to residence is the impact of the student’s presence on the community. A student who is injured, ill, or exhibiting disturbing or disruptive behavior may require ongoing care. Serious alcohol- or drug-related problems, in particular, have the potential to disrupt dormitory life and life in the academic community significantly and impair a student’s ability to function academically and socially. Harvard College regards as unreasonable the expectation that roommates, suitemates, friends, or residential staff will take on health care responsibilities for other students.

    Any student may, of course, refuse to allow consultation between the student's clinician(s) and Harvard College, but such a refusal will not prevent the College from making a decision regarding a student’s return to residence or continued enrollment.

    Consultations and Interventions

    Consultations and Interventions for Behavioral Disturbances Due to Alcohol or Drug Abuse or Other Health Issues

    The College’s concern for students’ well-being encompasses the preservation of a safe environment and the proactive provision of health resources. The College communicates to all students the availability of psychological, psychiatric, and medical resources at Harvard University Health Services (HUHS) for consultation, assessment, education, intervention, and possible ongoing treatment of behavioral disturbances arising from alcohol or drug abuse and other health issues. The College encourages students’ voluntary use of these confidential resources, and proctors, tutors, and Resident Deans routinely refer students to them or remind students of their availability.

    Occasionally, a student with potentially significant problems in the use of alcohol, use of drugs, or other health issues does not voluntarily seek help to ameliorate them. These problems often become apparent to residential staff, Harvard police, or other University officers in the form of significant disruption of, for example, life in the residential community, disturbance of personal relationships, or threats to the safety of individuals or of property. A student’s behavioral problems resulting from substance use or psychological disorder also may recur or persist over time, and thus may pose a significant threat to the student's own health and well-being or the health and well-being of others. The College may initiate disciplinary proceedings in response to the student’s conduct. In addition, regardless of whether disciplinary proceedings are initiated, where a student has not voluntarily sought help, the student’s Resident Dean may formally refer the student to HUHS for evaluation, ideally in consultation and cooperation with the student.

    In the referral the Resident Dean will communicate both to the student and to the clinician the basis of the College’s concerns, and will make note of the referral in the student’s file. Should the student choose to decline the referral, then the Resident Dean and senior officers of the College will assess on the basis of available information whether it is appropriate for the student to continue in residence or remain enrolled in the College. The Dean of Harvard College may, if he deems it necessary and appropriate, place such a student on an involuntary leave of absence from the College.

    Should a student accept the referral, the student will meet with a HUHS clinician, who will assess the student’s use of alcohol or other drugs or other health issues, and make recommendations of further services to the student on the basis of that assessment. With the student’s knowledge, the clinician will inform the Resident Dean of the fact of the meeting, but will not disclose the substance of the meeting unless the clinician believes that the student’s or others’ health and well-being are at significant risk, or unless the student agrees that information be shared.

    Either at that time, based on the concerns that led to the referral, or later, should the student’s problems persist, the Dean of the College, in consultation with the student’s Resident Dean and with HUHS may condition the student’s continued residence or enrollment in the College on the student’s participation in ongoing counseling or other medical treatment. In this case, the Resident Dean will propose a formal agreement with the student, which will summarize the reasons for the College’s concern and the requirement that the College be informed in the event that the student should fail to keep appointments, interrupt counseling against clinical advice, or otherwise undermine the therapeutic process. The student must sign the agreement, and a copy will be given to all members of the student’s treatment team. Another copy will be placed in the student’s file.

    HUHS clinicians will determine the appropriate nature and venue of services for addressing the student’s substance abuse or other health issues. These services may include individual counseling or therapy, medical evaluation by a primary care clinician, ongoing groups for students with substances abuse or behavioral disturbances, and/or other services available to students at HUHS. As with other clinical issues, in certain instances HUHS may deem it appropriate to make a referral of the student to an outside clinician or program. In the event that the student receives ongoing services from an outside resource, the student must agree to permit that clinician or program to inform HUHS and the College if the student does not comply with treatment.

    Should the student decline to participate in counseling, fail actively to engage in ongoing treatment, or continue to manifest behavioral disturbance, the College will assess whether the student may appropriately remain within the residential community and will reserve the right to terminate the student’s residence, or enrollment in the College, if appropriate. In this instance too, the Dean of Harvard College may, if he deems it necessary and appropriate, place such a student on an involuntary leave of absence from the College. A student placed on leave may request to return to the College when clinicians at HUHS are able to conclude, with the student’s voluntary cooperation with their assessment, that the student may appropriately resume their participation in the College community.

    Medical Insurance and HUHS

    Harvard University Health Services (HUHS) and Medical Insurance

    Massachusetts Insurance Requirements

    Waiving the HUSHP Student Health Insurance Plan

    Mental Health Coverage

    Dental Coverage Options

    Confidentiality and Consent

    Patient Advocate

    Accessible Healthcare at Harvard

    Immunizations and Travel Health

    Harvard University Health Services (HUHS) at the Smith Campus Center
    huhs.harvard.edu 
    75 Mt. Auburn Street, Cambridge, MA
    617-495-5711, TTY: 800-439-0183

    HUHS at Harvard Law School
    Pound Hall
    1563 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA
    617-495-4414, TTY: 800-439-0183

    HUHS at Longwood Medical Area
    Vanderbilt Hall
    275 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA
    617-432-1370, TTY: 800-439-0183

    Harvard University Student Health Program (HUSHP)
    hushp.harvard.edu
    75 Mt. Auburn Street, Cambridge, MA
    617-495-2008
    mservices@huhs.harvard.edu

    Massachusetts Insurance Requirements

    Massachusetts law requires that all students enrolled in an institution of higher learning in Massachusetts participate in a qualifying student health insurance program or in a health plan with comparable coverage. All Harvard students are automatically enrolled in the Harvard University Student Health Program (HUSHP) and the cost of the program is applied to their student bill.

    Harvard University Student Health Program (HUSHP)

    hushp.harvard.edu

    The Harvard University Student Health Program (HUSHP) is comprised of two parts:

    • The Student Health Fee is required of all students who are more than half time and studying in Massachusetts. This fee covers most services at Harvard University Health Services (HUHS), including internal medicine, medical/surgical specialty care, mental health/counseling services, physical therapy, radiology, and urgent care.
    • The Student Health Insurance Plan coverage includes emergency room visits, hospitalizations, diagnostic lab/radiology services, ambulatory surgery, specialty care outside HUHS (limited), and prescription drug coverage. Benefit limits and cost-sharing may apply—visit hushp.harvard.edu for more details.

    Waiving the HUSHP Student Health Insurance Plan

    Students enrolled in a comparable health insurance plan may be eligible to waive the Student Health Insurance Plan. Waivers must be completed by the appropriate deadline or the charges will remain on your student bill. The deadline to waive is July 31, 2019 for the fall term (or full academic year) and January 31, 2020 for the spring term.

    • Before waiving, carefully evaluate whether your existing health plan will provide adequate, comprehensive coverage in the Boston area. Visit hushp.harvard.edu to review the waiver checklist for guidance. You will be fully responsible for all medical claims and prescription drug costs if you waive the Student Health Insurance Plan.
    • International students studying on campus at Harvard are not eligible to waive the Student Health Insurance Plan with foreign insurance, including those with a U.S.-based administrator. This is a requirement pursuant to the Massachusetts student health program regulations.

    For detailed information on the Harvard University Student Health Program policies, benefits, limitations, and exclusions, visit hushp.harvard.edu.

    Mental Health Coverage

    The Student Health Insurance Plan covers mental health inpatient and outpatient services outside of Harvard University Health Services (HUHS).

    Students who waive the Student Health Insurance Plan portion are eligible to be seen at HUHS under the Student Health Fee. There is no visit limit at HUHS; the number of visits is based on medical necessity as determined by the provider. Students who waive the Student Health Insurance Plan are responsible for the cost of mental health care outside of HUHS.

    Dental Coverage Options

    An optional dental plan is available for students and their eligible dependents. Rates, enrollment, and benefit information is available at hushp.harvard.edu. Coverage is effective August 1, 2019 - July 31, 2020. Enrollment and renewal is not automatic; the deadline is September 30, 2019.

    Students who do not enroll in a dental plan may choose to receive care on a fee-for-service basis, including Harvard Dental Service, that offers students a preventive care package and a discount on all specialty services and/or HSDM Dental Center that provides dental care to students.

    Confidentiality and Consent

    HUHS protects the confidentiality of all health and health-related records to the full extent of the law. Patient health records are stored electronically and are only accessed by HUHS staff members directly involved in the case. Each and every staff member employed by or affiliated with HUHS must participate in a thorough training and orientation on health information privacy and security laws and standards, and sign a confidentiality statement agreeing to maintain patient privacy within and outside the workplace. Written authorization from the student is necessary to release record information to any third party, except in highly unusual circumstances as required by law, or as indicated in the following paragraphs. Any questions or concerns about issues of confidentiality or patient rights at HUHS should be addressed to the Patient Advocate at 617-495-7583 or patadvoc@huhs.harvard.edu.

    The College may call upon professional staff at HUHS for consultation regarding the impact of a student’s physical or emotional health on residence, on the necessity of a medical leave of absence, or on special academic or residential arrangements or accommodations (see also Effect of Health Issues on Dormitory or House Residence, Clearance for Return, and Attendance, Absences, Reading Period, Examinations, and Extensions). If, as part of the consultation, the College requests medical information from HUHS about a student, then that information may be provided, in ordinary circumstances, only with the student’s permission. Where permission is given, only relevant information about the impact of a physical illness, disability, emotional difficulty, or other health condition on a student’s residential and academic life is discussed; information that is not relevant to the arrangements of residential and academic adjustments under consideration will not be disclosed. When a student chooses not to allow HUHS to provide such information to the College regarding pending academic or residential arrangements or accommodations, then the College will proceed to make decisions in the absence of this information. It is also possible for students to initiate a consultation between their health care providers at HUHS and College administration.

    In certain circumstances it may not be possible or advisable for professional staff at HUHS to obtain a student’s consent to a disclosure of health or health-related information. Two such circumstances worthy of note include the following:

    Danger to self or others

    One exception to obtaining a student’s consent is the rare instance in which a student’s medical condition or behavioral disturbance poses a danger to the student or threat to others or to the community. HUHS professional staff may then disclose any relevant information to any appropriate person, including College officials, for the purpose of protecting the student, others, or the community from harm. Generally, even in this situation, every effort is made to notify the student of the need to disclose and the reason for such disclosure.

    Treatment at area hospitals or medical facilities

    It is the policy of HUHS to notify the College of student transfers to local emergency departments. Such notification is provided to the appropriate Resident Dean, and is documented at HUHS. If a Resident Dean, other residential official, or College administrator has reason to believe that a student is not in residence and may be in a medical facility, that individual may contact HUHS regarding a student’s whereabouts. The HUHS clinician ordinarily will disclose only that the student is safely in care. When, in an HUHS clinician’s medical judgment, a student is in a life-threatening condition, or is psychologically unstable, or has sustained an illness or injury that will likely result in a hospital admission or require care after discharge, that clinician will notify the student’s Resident Dean, residential official, or College administrator. Only information regarding the fact of the admission/discharge, location of the student, general medical condition, and prospects for return to residence is shared; information regarding diagnosis or treatment is not shared. Students returning from emergency care or hospitalization at area facilities are expected to update HUHS and ordinarily will be assessed regarding suitability to return to residence (See Procedure for Notification and Consultation, and Clearance for Return).

    When HUHS is aware that a student who has been hospitalized or received emergency treatment decides to leave a medical facility against medical advice, an HUHS clinician may apprise that student’s Resident Dean or other appropriate College official of this decision, if in the clinician’s judgment the student’s decision may pose a significant risk of physical or emotional danger to the student, to roommates or suitemates, or to members of the residential community. Depending upon the circumstances, the clinician may inform a College official of the student’s location, decision to leave a facility against medical advice, risk of further injury or relapse, or possible threat to the student’s own safety or to that of others.

    Patient Advocate

    The HUHS Patient Advocate is available to help you:

    • Navigate the health care system
    • Explore choices for your medical care
    • Resolve or mediate problems
    • Discuss financial assistance options
    • Coordinate special needs arrangements

    For more information about the ways that the Patient Advocate can help you, please visit https://huhs.harvard.edu/about-us/patient-advocate or contact the HUHS Patient Advocate, Mallory Finne, directly at patadvoc@huhs.harvard.edu or 617-495-7583.

    Accessible Healthcare at Harvard

    HUHS is prepared to meet the general and special health care needs of students. Early contact with a primary care physician is advised to establish a base for continuity of care during a student’s active stay at Harvard. Should a student need accommodations for consulting with their physician, including sign language interpreters or alternative format text, they should consult with the Accessible Education Office in advance. Patient Advocates in HUHS are also available to assist individuals who have unique needs or assistance with follow-up care.

    Immunizations and Travel Health

    Required Immunizations

    Massachusetts has strict immunization requirements that you must meet in order to register for classes. Immunizations help protect you from illnesses and contribute to the overall well-being of our community. We encourage you to receive any required immunizations before you arrive at Harvard, as many private health plans will cover the cost. If you are unable to obtain these prior to your arrival on campus, you may arrange to get immunizations at various locations in the area, including HUHS. Please note that your health plan may not cover immunizations you receive at HUHS, in which case you will be responsible for the cost of the immunizations. Please note that the Student Health Insurance Plan covers preventive immunizations only administered at HUHS.

    All students are required to comply with the Massachusetts immunization regulations and submit a complete immunization history to Harvard University Health Services prior to registration. Non-submission and/or missing required immunizations will place a hold on your account and you will not be able to register for classes.

    Travel Health Immunizations and Information

    HUHS provides immunizations and related services, including expert counseling and advice for individual travel health needs, on a fee-for-service basis. HUHS recommends scheduling travel health appointments six to eight weeks in advance of travel.

    The Student Health Fee covers your care at HUHS, but does not cover your care elsewhere. Students enrolled in the Student Health Insurance Plan are covered throughout the United States and abroad; however, these benefits are limited while traveling. Review Travel in the U.S. and Travel outside the U.S. for details. Students enrolled in non-Harvard insurance should contact their insurance company to verify their coverage while traveling. Be sure to ask about your benefits and potential out-of-pocket costs.

    Policy Regarding Undergraduate Student Organizations

    Statement of Policy Regarding Undergraduate Student Organizations

    Independent Student Organizations

    Department Sponsored Student Organizations

    Recognized Social Organizations

    Unrecognized and Non-Harvard Organizations

    Funding and Finances

    Hazing

    The College views a commitment to non-discrimination as essential to its pedagogical objectives and institutional mission. This commitment is reflected in the expectations outlined below for students as members of our College community and members of undergraduate organizations. Discrimination based on race, color, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion, creed, national origin, age, ancestry, veteran status, disability, military service, or any other legally protected basis is contrary to the principles and policies of Harvard University. (See Discrimination and Unrecognized and Non-Harvard Organizations).

    Harvard College categorizes student organizations in the following way:

    • Independent Student Organizations (ISOs). ISOs receive designated benefits from the College, are responsible for meeting filing requirements with the DSO, and are accountable to the College for responsible use of those benefits.
    • Department Sponsored Student Organizations (DSSOs): DSSOs are led, organized or sponsored by University departments, offices or units and thus do not meet the definition of recognized Independent Student Organizations. DSSOs receive designated benefits afforded to ISOs and file with the DSO to obtain access to those benefits.
    • Recognized Social Organizations (RSOs): RSOs are designed to support organizations comprised primarily of Harvard College undergraduates, whose purpose is primarily social and which do not discriminate on the basis of gender. RSOs work closely with the DSO to be considered for, and to maintain, their recognition.
    • Unrecognized or Non-Harvard Organizations (such as unrecognized single-gender social organizations and other groups not recognized by the DSO): As these organizations are not recognized, the College does not provide them with access, support, or benefits. Individual students involved in such organizations of course remain subject to the College’s policies including the policy with regard to unrecognized single-gender social organizations discussed further below.

    For more on these categories and the process by which they are governed, see the DSO website.

    Independent Student Organizations (ISOs)

    Through recognized undergraduate organizations each new class leaves its special mark on the cultural, social, and intellectual life of the College. In granting recognition to Independent Student Organizations (ISOs), the intention of the College is to support students who wish to pursue their various interests and talents in ways that are separate from formal course study. Recognition of an ISO is not an indication that the University approves or endorses the ISO’s goals, activities, or points of view.

    Provided these ISOs meet and maintain the College’s requirements for recognition, the College is willing to provide them with certain benefits and privileges. However, ISOs are independent and distinct from Harvard University. The College’s recognition of, and provision of benefits and privileges to, an ISO does not mean that the ISO is a unit of the University or controlled by the University. The University is not responsible for an ISO’s contracts or other acts or omissions.

    An ISO is defined as a group of Harvard College students who unite to promote or celebrate a common interest. While the membership of an ISO may include students from other Harvard graduate or professional schools, the majority of the members must be Harvard College undergraduates. Faculty, staff, or community members, as appropriate, may participate in ISO activities, but may not hold leadership roles. Only currently enrolled undergraduates at the College are permitted to serve as officers of recognized ISOs.

    Recognized ISOs must maintain local autonomy. This means that the ISO must make all policy decisions without obligation to any parent organization, national chapter, or charter, and without direction, interference or pressure from any such entity.

    ISOs do not qualify for use of the University’s taxpayer identification number or the University’s tax-exempt status in connection with purchases or sales by the ISO, gifts directly to the ISO, interest or other income of the ISO, or any other activity of the ISO. The College will consider requests to establish an account controlled by the College to which contributions might be made for the benefit of an ISO.

    Benefits Granted to Independent Student Organizations

    ISOs granted recognition by the Committee on Student Life may receive many benefits, which include:

    • Plan Events and Activities on Campus
      • Ability to reserve College rooms, concert halls, and outdoor spaces for events and activities.
      • Permission to publicize, poster and reserve sandwich boards on campus including posting on the College Calendar.
      • Access to ticketing services provided by the Harvard Box Office.
    • Recruit on Campus
      • Participation in the annual student activity fair held in the fall, as well as an opportunity to enter the lottery for the activity fair held each spring for prospective students.
      • Inclusion in the online directory of student organizations.
      • Ability for students to list their ISO or DSSO affiliation in the Harvard College Yearbook.
    • Use the Harvard College Name
      • Permission to use the Harvard College name and trademarks, in accordance with Harvard guidelines.
    • Manage Finances and Fundraising
      • Organization banking account at the Harvard University Employees Credit Union.
      • Ability to apply for and receive grants from University sources, such as the President's Public Service Fund, the Office for the Arts, and the Undergraduate Council.
      • Ability to fundraise with specific permission from DSO.
      • Upon demonstration of a useful contribution to the Harvard College community through the activities of the ISO, the College may determine that a gift or endowment account controlled by the College, to which tax-deductible contributions may be made, may be established at the College for the benefit of the ISO.
    • Access Services and Support
      • Email and website organization accounts through the Harvard Computer Society.
      • Advising and support services from the DSO.
      • Ability to archive organizational materials in University Archives.
      • Ability to apply for and/or receive a mailbox, or storage space in the Student Organization Center at Hilles.

    Responsibilities of Independent Student Organizations

    Independent Student Organizations are expected to meet the following requirements to remain in good standing with the College:

    • Compliance
      • Comply with all local, state, and federal laws and regulations, and with Harvard’s policies and requirements, as set forth in the Harvard College Handbook for Students, the DSO website, and any other written materials from the DSO.
      • Operate in a manner consistent with the goals and standards of the University.
      • Annual Registration with the DSO each spring.
      • File a current constitution and bylaws with the DSO making clear that the ISO does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion, creed, national origin, age, ancestry, veteran status, disability, military service, or any other legally protected basis.
      • File non-hazing attestation forms annually with the DSO, take active steps to understand hazing and identify hazing activities, and undertake only team-building activities that do not involve hazing.
      • Submit to the DSO a complete list of officers and members demonstrating that the ISO meets the requirements listed below. Notify the DSO promptly when there are changes in the roster of officers.
        • All officers and a majority of the members must be enrolled undergraduates in good standing with the College. A minimum of ten undergraduate members is required.
        • All other members must be students from other Harvard graduate or professional schools.
      • Attend all required training sessions, including those held annually.
      • Secure appropriate insurance coverage, when applicable, for organizational activities.
    • Communication
      • Consult with the DSO when planning any activities for which significant attendance is anticipated (including, for example, outdoor events, conferences, parties, or late night socials) or when planning any other event that involves unusual or potentially risky activities or elements.
      • Provide timely notification to the DSO and the Committee on Student Life of any changes in its constitution and by-laws and submit a copy of the amended documents for approval. Inform the DSO of any other changes within the ISO in a timely fashion.
      • Maintain with the DSO an accurate and complete list of officers and members.
      • Communicate with University offices in a timely manner. When services are needed from University offices, ISOs should assume that at least three weeks' prior notice is required.
    • Leadership
      • Manage University resources wisely, ethically, and according to University and College guidelines.
      • Develop and ensure successful officer transitions including good record keeping and new officer orientation.
      • Manage organization’s finances responsibly by maintaining accurate financial records, implementing appropriate procedures, and meeting all financial obligations.
    • Accurate Representation
      • Clearly and accurately identify the ISO’s relationship with the University in print and electronic publications, on websites, and in promotional materials, fundraising, contracts, and other activities. In all dealings with third parties and written materials, the ISO is required to include the appropriate disclaimers.
      • In all written materials, ISOs should describe themselves as: “A student-run organization at Harvard College.”
      • In all contracts, ISOs should include the following two provisions: (1) “The parties hereto agree and understand that Harvard University is not a party to this contract and that Harvard University is not responsible, under any circumstances, for performing any obligations of this contract;” and (2) “[Third Party]’s use of the name “Harvard” (alone or as part of another name) in advertising or promotional materials is not permitted.”
    • Local Autonomy
      • Maintain local autonomy in the governance of the organization. This means that the ISO must make all policy decisions without obligation to any parent organization, national chapter, or charter, and without direction, interference or pressure from any such entity. ISOs that have graduate trusteeships or other advising boards composed of responsible alumni ordinarily will be considered to be in compliance with this rule.
    • Advisers
      • Have an adviser who is an employee of the University and preferably one who holds a personal interest or professional expertise that relates to the organization being advised. Consult regularly with the adviser regarding the activities of the organization.

    Department Sponsored Student Organizations

    Some student organizations are led, organized or sponsored by University departments, offices or units and thus do not meet the definition of recognized Independent Student Organizations. These department sponsored student organizations (DSSOs) generally have the following characteristics:

    • A University department, office or unit acknowledges the organization as part of its activities and works closely in a supervisory capacity with the organization.
    • The mission, purpose, and goals of the organization are aligned with those of the University department, office or unit.
    • The organization’s events and activities are carried out on behalf of the University department, office or unit.
    • The University department, office or unit plays a role in selecting the organization’s members.
    • The University department, office or unit may provide advising and financial resources to support the organization.
    • Funding for the organization’s activities is provided directly by the University department, office or unit.
    • Unlike recognized ISOs, the organization may not sign contracts on its own behalf; instead, all contracts must be signed by an officer of the University.

    Benefits Granted to Department Sponsored Student Organizations

    • Plan Events and Activities on Campus
      • Ability to reserve College rooms, concert halls, and outdoor spaces for events and activities.
      • Permission to publicize, poster, and reserve sandwich boards on campus including posting on the College Calendar.
      • Access to ticketing services provided by the Harvard Box Office.
    • Recruit on Campus
      • Participation in the annual student activity fair held in the fall.
      • Inclusion in the online directory of student organizations.
      • Ability for students to list their ISO or DSSO affiliation in the Harvard College Yearbook.
    • Use of the Harvard College Name
      • Permission to use the Harvard College name and trademarks, in accordance with Harvard guidelines.
    • Access Services and Support
      • Email and website organization accounts through the Harvard Computer Society
      • Advising and support services through the DSO.
      • Ability to archive organizational materials in the University Archives.
      • Ability to apply for and/or receive a mailbox in the Student Organization Center at Hilles.
    • Use of the University's tax-exempt and non-profit status. 

    Responsibilities of Department Sponsored Student Organizations

    In order for the DSO to provide privileges and benefits to DSSOs, the following filing requirements must be met:

    • Officer information
    • Sponsorship Attestation Form signed by the University office or department
    • Non-hazing compliance form
    • A current constitution and bylaws that do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion, creed, national origin, age, ancestry, veteran status, disability, military service, or any other legally protected basis

    Recognized Social Organizations

    The category of Recognized Social Organiation (RSO) is designed to support organizations comprised primarily of Harvard College undergraduates, whose purpose is primarily social and which do not discriminate on the basis of gender. Becoming an RSO is an important milestone marking a group's commitment to becoming an inclusive community aligned with the educational mission and values of Harvard College. Through recognition the College is verifying a social organization's gender-inclusivity and therefore ensuring students (of the Class of 2021 and later) who belong to RSOs have full access to leadership positions and fellowship opportunities at the College.

    RSO Relationship with the College

    RSOs are independent and distinct from Harvard University, as our Independent Student Organizations (ISOs) are. In recognizing an RSO, Harvard College is not adopting its goals, activities, or points of view. Provided that an RSO meets certain requirements, however, the College will verify that an RSO is not an Unrecognized Single-Gender Social Organization for the purposes of the May 2016 social organization policy. In addition, RSOs will be eligible for certain privileges to support their function as positive and inclusive social spaces at Harvard College. The provision of such privileges does not mean a RSO is a unit of the University, or controlled by the University. These privileges are contingent on a RSO’s compliance with all policies outlined for all recognized student organizations. Certain of these policies include that the University is not responsible for an RSO's contracts or other acts or omissions. RSOs, especially those who own or rent space, are therefore encouraged to carry appropriate insurance. RSOs do not qualify for the use of the University’s taxpayer identification number or tax-exempt status in connection with purchases and sales, gifts to the RSO, or any other activity. A full discussion of the applicable policies is set forth in the Recognized Student Organization Resource and Policy Guide.

    Unrecognized and Non-Harvard Organizations

    The regulations for ISOs require that they maintain local autonomy. This means that all policy decisions must be made without obligation to any parent organization. The regulations also require ISOs to comply with the University’s policy that discrimination based on race, color, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion, creed, national origin, age, ancestry, veteran status, disability, military service, or any other legally protected basis is contrary to the principles and policies of Harvard University. (See Discrimination) In this way, the independence and integrity of the College are maintained.

    From time to time, undergraduates raise questions about their membership in unrecognized or non-Harvard organizations. It is important that students make well-informed decisions when considering membership in these organizations. Organizations defined as non-Harvard or as unrecognized single-gender social organizations are not permitted to conduct any activity at Harvard even though their activities involve Harvard undergraduates.

    The College views a commitment to non-discrimination as essential to its pedagogical objectives and institutional mission. It has adopted the following policies with regard to unrecognized-single-gender social organizations:

    1. For students matriculating in the fall of 2017 and thereafter: any such students who become members of unrecognized single-gender social organizations will not be eligible to hold leadership positions in recognized student organizations or athletic teams.
    2. For students matriculating in the fall of 2017 and thereafter: any such students who become members of unrecognized single-gender social organizations will not be eligible to receive College-Administered fellowships.

    For Questions related to this policy, please see the DSO website.

    However, in special circumstances, unrecognized student organizations whose membership consists entirely of Harvard College undergraduates may, at the discretion of a particular Harvard office or department, be permitted to co-sponsor educational programs organized by that office or department.

    Funding and Finances

    ISOs seek funds from a variety of sources that include membership dues, fee-paying events, advertising, alumni/ae endowments, and friends of the organization. Most of these endowments, foundations, and friends’ groups have been established to perpetuate the ISO and to provide financial subsidy for programs. Endowments are usually administered by alumni/ae groups in consultation with the Dean of Students Office. The College encourages the development of such financial arrangements and, when appropriate, will use University resources to assist with fund drives. Such fund drives must have the prior approval of the Dean of Students Office. An ISO must obtain permission through the Dean to solicit support from its alumni/ae.

    The earnings of any ISO may not accrue to individual members. Some ISOs pay salaries to members for services performed by those members. ISOs wishing to pay such salaries or other forms of remuneration must first receive approval from the Dean of Students Office. It is expected that salaries will ordinarily conform to current student wage rates in student employment, although special compensation may be given to managers of ISOs.

    ISOs are responsible for their own finances and for keeping their own financial records, and the College expects that they will be managed in a prudent fashion. The Dean of Students Office provides training for financial officers and guidelines for the maintenance of financial records through workshops held each year.

    Under the conditions of recognition, financial officers will be required to attend a financial seminar, ISOs will be required to present annual financial reports to the Dean of Students Office, and an audit of an ISO’s finances may also be required.

    ISOs that are Massachusetts corporations and federally tax exempt are reminded of the requirement to file special financial reports annually with the Secretary of State in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and with the Internal Revenue Service.

    The College makes a considerable contribution to student organization success by providing: student organization resources in the Student Organization Center at Hilles; rooms for meetings and other facilities; resources for music, debate, drama, and dance; in-kind contributions such as professional advice in fundraising for existing foundations, friends’ groups, and new projects; help in ticketing events through the Harvard Box Office; event planning and support; leadership training; mailboxes and mail delivery for student groups; negotiated transportation options; and more. For more information on how the College can help your ISO, feel free to stop by the Dean of Students Office at University Hall, or email soch@fas.harvard.edu.

    Hazing

    The laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts forbid any form of hazing in connection with initiation into a student organization (see Hazing). As a condition of College recognition, all student organizations must file non-hazing attestation forms with the Dean of Students Office. Students should also consult an important guide, Preventing Hazing at Harvard, available online at the Dean of Students Office website, that explains the College’s policies regarding hazing, how to identify hazing activities, and suggestions for group activities that do not involve hazing. These policies also apply to unrecognized organizations whose membership is made up of Harvard College students. See http://osl.fas.harvard.edu/hazing.

    Regulations for Independent Student Organizations

    Recognition of Independent Student Organizations

    Officers' Responsibility

    General Requirements

    Recognition of Independent Student Organizations

    The Committee on Student Life has the authority to grant official recognition to ISOs and has established regulations for their governance as set forth in the Handbook for Students, including without limitation under the headings Responsibilities of Independent Student Organizations and Regulations for Independent Student Organizations. ISOs also are expected to abide by the regulations of the Dean of Students Office available online at the DSO website. The College expects ISOs to comply with all applicable regulations. If the Committee on Student Life determines that an ISO has failed to do so, it may revoke the ISO’s charter. ISOs must re-register with the Dean of Students Office each year in order to continue their recognition. Should an ISO not meet the registration deadline, fail to turn in any of the registration documents, and/or not reconcile debts with outside vendors, then the ISO will be placed on probation by the Dean of Students Office. During the probationary period, the ISO will be unable to reserve space on campus, advertise for events, use the Harvard name, and/or participate in the visiting program or fall activity fairs.

    The official list of ISOs and rules governing their activities are available from the Dean of Students Office.

    All officially recognized ISOs have the privilege of using Harvard College’s name and its facilities in accordance with the limitations detailed on the Dean of Students Office website. Complete information on the procedures that should be followed to obtain recognition is found online at the DSO website.

    Official recognition follows upon recommendation of the Undergraduate Council (UC) Rules Committee to the Committee on Student Life. Student organization proposals are evaluated by the Committee according to the following criteria:

    • Compliance with all applicable Harvard policies.
    • Demonstrated non-duplication of the mission of previously recognized ISOs and lack of clear similarity with another already-recognized ISO.
    • Clearly articulated objectives and goals.
    • Feasibility of funding the stated goals, projects, or publications.
    • Demonstrated plan for sustainability.
    • Local autonomy (whether all policy decisions will be made without obligation to any parent organization, national chapter, or charter).
    • At least ten undergraduate members. All officers and a majority of the members must be enrolled undergraduates of Harvard College.
    • Adherence to the University's non-discrimination policy.
    • Demonstrated benefit to the members, campus, and/or wider community.
    • Demonstrated need for recognition based on benefits provided to recognized ISOs.

    To maintain official status, ISOs must register with the Dean of Students Office each spring. Failure to meet these requirements will cause an ISO to be placed on probation and to lose all privileges given to recognized ISOs.

    Officers’ Responsibility

    The officers of each ISO are responsible for knowledge of the rules governing independent student organizations and are expected to keep members of their organization informed of all such rules. If there is any doubt about the interpretation or if any ISO wishes an exception made, the Dean of Students Office, University Hall, should be consulted. (Members of ISOs should note that they are of course also subject to all expectations for conduct set forth in the Handbook for Students.) Officers of ISOs are reminded of their accountability under the Drugs and Alcohol Policy. Any violation of the rules may lead to the suspension or revocation of an ISO’s charter by the Committee on Student Life.

    The officers of every ISO are expected to update their information with the Dean of Students Office as needed, depending on the leadership transition of each student organization, in order to assume activities for the academic year in question. As noted above, ISOs that fail to meet the requirements of registration will be placed on probation and/or will lose their recognition status by the College.

    General Requirements

    In addition to the Responsibilities of Independent Student Organizations set forth elsewhere, the following requirements apply to ISOs:

    • Only ISOs that have received approval from the Dean of Harvard College may use “Harvard College” in their names. Approval of the name and recognition by the Dean’s Office constitutes permission to use that name in notices of meetings and written materials. Any regular publication sponsored by the ISO that uses “Harvard” in its title needs advance permission. Permission to use “Harvard” or “Harvard College” in the name of a group applies to undergraduate ISOs, and not to alumni groups (see also The Use of Harvard University’s Trademarks (Names and Insignia) or visit the following website: http://trademark.harvard.edu). Explicit advance permission of the Office of the Dean or Provost is needed before an organization can give permission to a third party to use the Harvard name or to imply connection with the College or University.
    • ISOs must not duplicate the mission of previously recognized organizations.
    • College policy (see General Regulations and Standards of Conduct) requires that students on probation may not engage in any competition or activity that, in the opinion of the Administrative Board, may interfere with their College work. A student on probation must attend all classes and be especially conscientious about all academic responsibilities. If the offense or unsatisfactory academic record is related to participation in extracurricular activity, the Administrative Board may at its discretion restrict participation; in cases in which management of time appears to be the problem, the Administrative Board may ask the student to obtain the Board’s permission for participation in each individual extracurricular activity.
    • Students on leave of absence or requirement to withdraw may not take part in student activities, including student organizations.
    • Faculty members may not be voting members or officers of undergraduate ISOs. They are, however, encouraged to serve as advisers, sponsors, or consultants.
    • No organization shall be allowed to appear on a commercially sponsored radio or television program.
    • No organization shall in any publication, broadcast, public performance, or other venue purport to represent the views or opinions of Harvard University, or its body.
    • No organization may act so as to endanger the tax-exempt status of Harvard University.
    • No organization may be connected with any advertising medium, including the press or other public forum, that makes use of the name of Harvard (see also The Use of the Harvard Name and Insignia and  http://trademark.harvard.edu/.)
    • Students and student organizations are expected to respect the privacy of students and alumni/ae particularly those with FERPA blocks.

    Religion

    The ability to express one’s views regarding religion is a significant freedom of speech that the College upholds. In some instances, this type of expression becomes an avenue for persuasion to affiliate with a particular religion. Discussion in this vein is prohibited when the educational and work environment of an individual or the community is jeopardized. Harassment is defined as actions on the part of an individual or group which demean or abuse another individual because of religious beliefs or that continue after the affected individual has requested a termination of that type of discussion. In all instances in which a particular religion sponsors an event or discussion, the individual or group initiating such contact must clearly identify its sponsorship or the sectarian religious nature of its agenda.

    On occasion, students have expressed concerns about feeling pressure to join a particular religious organization. The Harvard Chaplains, the interfaith association of chaplains at Harvard, are attuned to some of the issues related to religious recruitment through high-pressure tactics and can offer suggestions for intervention and prevention. More information is available in the Harvard Chaplains Office (617-495-5529) located in the basement of the Memorial Church.

    Publications

    An organization or group of undergraduates wishing to create a new student publication must file a full description of the proposed publication with the Dean of Students Office, in addition to fulfilling requirements outlined under Recognition of Independent Student Organizations. Sufficient details as to financing, circulation, and authorship must be included in the description to give assurance that it is a Harvard College student enterprise and financially responsible.

    Publicity and Solicitation

    Distribution of Printed Matter

    Distribution of printed matter in the Houses, dormitories, Dudley residences, Annenberg Hall, or on Harvard property must be approved by the Dean of Students Office. The Faculty Deans, Dudley Assistant Dean, and the First-Year Experience Office have the right to regulate the time, place, and manner of distribution in their areas. In each of the above cases, permission to distribute printed matter may be granted upon application to the Dean of Students Office. Student groups may also wish to use the distribution services of Harvard Student Agencies. For distribution of materials outdoors, all ISOs must register with the Dean of Students Office.

    Should a group of students that is not an independent student organization or department sponsored student organization wish to distribute printed matter on campus, permission to do so may be granted by the Dean of Students Office upon submission of a petition signed by ten enrolled undergraduates. Distribution cannot occur until approval has been made explicit.

    Posters

    Posters may be placed only on bulletin boards and kiosks and not on doors, fences, entry posts, gates, poles, waste containers, sidewalks, or other similar places. Organizations violating these rules may be fined up to $200 per daily violation and may lose postering privileges by the College. The defacement of sidewalks or buildings with posters, chalk, or any other material is prohibited.

    • Every ISO/RSO in good standing with the College, including official House organizations, has the privilege of posting on University bulletin boards and kiosks.
    • “Restricted” bulletin boards (inside classrooms or buildings) are limited to the use of designated departments or organizations. The official representative of the respective department or organization must approve use of these bulletin boards.
    • Prior permission of the Dean of Students Office is required for posters larger than 11” x 17”. Posters are removed from bulletin boards and kiosks every Monday and Thursday, staffing and weather permitting.
    • Unrecognized student organizations must obtain prior permission of the Dean of Students Office to post on University bulletin boards and kiosks and such permission will be granted only in exceptional cases.
    • The bottom right-hand corner of all posters must clearly denote the ISO's/RSO's official name and include details on accessibility. For more information, please visit the Dean of Students Office webpage regarding accessibility considerations.
    • It is against City of Cambridge ordinances to affix posters and notices to utility poles.

    Balloons

    Student organizations are prohibited from advertising events by use of balloons in Harvard Yard. In rare circumstances, permission may be granted by the Dean of Students Office.

    Solicitation

    Solicitation in University buildings and on University property must have prior approval of the proper authority. Permission for each of the following activities must be obtained from the indicated office:

    • Sales of subscriptions to recognized publications, sales of tickets to functions given by ISOs/RSOs, and sales of recordings of ISOs/RSOs (provided all such sales are conducted in the immediate vicinity of College Dining Halls, Sanders Theatre, or by the Science Center): the Dean of Students Office.
    • All other sales: Director of Student Employment and the Dean of Students Office.
    • All solicitation and canvassing must be carried out between the hours of 9 am and 9:30 pm on weekdays only. Exceptions may be granted by the Dean of Students Office.
    • The First-Year Experience Office, Faculty Deans, or Dudley Assistant Dean may deny permission to carry on the above in their dormitories or Houses or Dudley-affiliated space.
    • Permission of the Dean of Students Office must be obtained in order to solicit prior to the first day of classes.

    Use of Harvard University Trademarks

    The Use of Harvard University’s Trademarks (Names and Insignia)

    The Trademark Program (http://trademark.harvard.edu) is charged with the protection and licensing of Harvard’s trademarks worldwide and the administration of the University’s internal Use-of-Name policies and guidelines. The office also provides advice to members of the Harvard community on a wide range of trademark-related issues.

    In its protection efforts, the office registers Harvard’s various trademarks and works to stop their unauthorized use around the world. Through its domestic and international licensing endeavors, the office licenses the University’s trademarks (e.g., Harvard, Harvard University, Harvard College, Harvard Medical School, HBS, Harvard Football, the VERITAS shield, etc.) to qualified companies to produce a variety of insignia items; proceeds from the sales of these items are provided to the Faculty of Arts and Sciences for undergraduate financial aid. The office also administers Harvard’s Use-of-Name policies, which were established by the University to ensure that the Harvard name and insignias are used appropriately and accurately by the University community and in accordance with the principles contained in the policies.

    All Harvard student group names incorporating any of the University’s trademarks are owned by the President and Fellows of Harvard College (Harvard University) and are used by permission of the University. In addition, the use of any of Harvard’s shields/logos by student groups is by permission of the University. Also, any use of Harvard’s names/logos by student groups or students must comply with all relevant University policies, including the policy on the Use of Harvard Names and Insignias.

    Development

    Any ISO wishing to raise funds outside the Harvard University campus—whether from an individual or from an organization—must receive prior approval from the Dean of Students Office. ISOs must also obtain permission of the Dean to solicit support from alumni/ae and may request information on ways to reach alumni/ae for the purpose of development through the Dean of Students Office. Regulations regarding fundraising can be found online at the DSO website.

    Meetings and Events

    Complete information regarding policies and procedures for planning student organization events and activities can be found online at the DSO website.

    Officers of ISOs, RSOs and DSSOs must receive approval for conferences and other large events from the Dean of Students Office prior to planning such events. In addition, officers of ISOs and RSOs should alert the Dean of Students Office before signing any contracts with vendors, hotels, consultants, or performers. (DSSOs may not sign contracts on their own behalf.)

    Indoor Meetings

    College classrooms, lecture halls, and certain other rooms are available to ISOs, RSOs and DSSOs, with the understanding that:

    • Rooms will be kept neat and clean.
    • There will be no unnecessary noise or actions that might disturb other occupants or those in surrounding buildings or in the street or office below.
    • Room Reservation privileges are non-transferable and may not be reserved on behalf of unrecognized organizations, non-College organizations, or other third party entities.
    • Permission to use on-campus spaces and venues must be provided by the appropriate room scheduler.  For a list of venues and how to make a reservation, see the DSO website.

    An ISO, RSO or DSSO may not announce its meeting place until it has received official permission in writing for the use of that location. Meetings sponsored jointly with outside organizations are not permitted in University buildings without explicit permission from the Dean of Students Office.

    Events open to the public ("open to the public" is defined as open to attendees beyond a particular House community, ISO, RSO or DSSO membership) should be planned with accessibility considerations in mind. Organizers should consider wheelchair accessibility, seating arrangements, audio-visual accessibility, alternative print options, podium access, and sign language availability as they plan events. For more information on accessibility, or to receive help in planning for these accommodations, there are several resources available. Pease contact the Dean of Students Office, refer to the DSO website, or seek the assistance of the Accessible Education Office at 617-496-8707 or University Disability Services.

    Outdoor Meetings/Events

    • Outdoor space request forms must be completed and approved by the Dean of Students Office for any outdoor meeting.
    • On University property, outdoor meetings may not be held in the immediate vicinity of classrooms during normal class hours, nor may they be held near residence buildings between 9 pm and 9 am.
    • The use of private property also requires the permission of the owner.
    • Meetings sponsored jointly with outside organizations are not permitted on University property.
    • The use of city streets or other public property also requires written authorization from and compliance with regulations of the City of Cambridge.

    Restricted Dates for Events

    Permission will not be given to hold concerts, dramatic performances, debates, meetings, rallies, contests of any kind, etc., during Examination Periods. Late night social events also will not be approved during the weekend of the Head of the Charles Regatta. In addition, restrictions will be placed on events during Reading Periods if they interfere with residential areas and libraries where exam preparation is underway.

    Paid Admissions

    All public events must be registered and approved in advance through the Dean of Students Office through the Event Registration process. In addition, the Event Registration policy may require the presence of a University police officer and/or tutors or proctors, City of Cambridge licenses, and/or an Event Supervisor or Beverage Server through Student Event Services. The Event Registration Policy and appropriate forms can be found online at the DSO website. Questions about this process may be answered in the Dean of Students Office.

    Motion Pictures

    Any student group or organization in the College and the Houses borrowing commercial films must follow all copyright regulations as outlined below.

    • If admission is charged, any surplus revenue shall be used to further the educational goals of the sponsoring organization, as outlined in its charter.
    • The showing of commercial films in the College and its Houses is subject to the following regulations: (a) advertising must be restricted to the Harvard community; (b) the House Committee, ISO, RSO, or DSSO, or other appropriate committee will ordinarily be responsible for the screening of films and for financial arrangements.
    • Organizations showing films must conform to all applicable city and state fire regulations.

    Copyright Regulations

    The Federal Copyright Act makes it unlawful to show a film in public without the explicit permission of the film’s copyright owner. Renting or purchasing a DVD at a local video store or elsewhere gives the customer the right to view the film but not to show it in public. The Copyright Act defines “public” in this context as “any place where a substantial number of persons outside of a normal circle of a family and its social acquaintances is gathered.”

    Several major production and distribution companies—Columbia, MGM, Paramount, Orion, and others—have given notice that arrangements to show their films publicly on university campuses can be made by calling Swank Motion Pictures of St. Louis (314-289-2102). All students who wish to show films under circumstances that are likely to be considered “public” are urged to call this organization to arrange for appropriate permission.

    Public Performances

    General Requirements in Regulations for Independent Student Organizations.

    Dances

    Dances must end by 2 am, per City of Cambridge ordinance. At any public dance, a University Police detail and/or tutors, proctors, or Student Event Services staff must be present. A complete list of guidelines for dances and the required Event Registration form are available in the Dean of Students Office.

    Working with Minors

    Harvard University is committed to providing a safe environment for everyone on its campuses and in its programs. This includes the thousands of minors who participate in programs and activities both on and off campus.  Members of the Harvard community who interact with minors in any official capacity are expected to foster and maintain an appropriate and secure environment for minors.  The University Policy can be found here: http://youthprotection.harvard.edu/policy

    Guidance for ISOs to comply with this policy can be found on the DSO website: http://osl.fas.harvard.edu/minor-policy-0

    Invitations to Distinguished Visitors

    In order to facilitate the necessary official courtesies for distinguished visitors, the Dean of Students Office must be notified in advance of any invitation and appropriate clearances obtained. Only then may invitations to visit Harvard as guests of an undergraduate ISO be issued to heads of state or governments, past or present, to cabinet members, and/or to ambassadors of foreign nations. The University Marshal’s office, located at Wadsworth House, also must be consulted about plans for distinguished visitors.

    Offices, Lockers, Mailboxes

    Harvard College values and supports the presence and contributions of ISOs. The College provides over 50,000 square feet of space in the Student Organization Center at Hilles (SOCH) to facilitate the productive work of Harvard College ISOs and to encourage collaboration among ISOs in proximity to one another. The SOCH offers student organization offices, lockers, and mailboxes. ISOs at the College are eligible to apply for SOCH space through an allocation process held each spring semester. All offices and lockers are allocated by the Dean of Students Office with the understanding that:

    • Rooms/lockers will be kept neat and clean.
    • There will be no unnecessary noise or actions that might disturb other occupants or those in surrounding buildings or in the street, office, or Cambridge neighborhood nearby.
    • Organizations will abide by the regulations of the Dean of Students Office as described on the websites of the Dean of Students Office and the SOCH.
    • Students with authorized access to individual offices must be registered members of that organization, as well as enrolled students of Harvard College.
    • ISOs may not allow other groups or individuals to use the rooms/lockers assigned to them without the written permission of the Dean of Students Office.
    • No office/locker keys may be duplicated without the permission of the Dean of Students Office.
    • ISOs will not hold the University responsible for property stored in their offices that is stolen or damaged.
    • Personal items belonging to individual students will not be stored in office spaces during summer breaks or any time during the academic year.
    • Alcohol is not allowed in student organization offices or storage spaces located in the SOCH or first-year dormitories.
    • Private parties may not be held in student organization offices.
    • Mailboxes are available in the SOCH by request for recognized organizations. Officers of the group will be expected to pick up mail regularly from their assigned box.
    • An ISO that violates the above regulations may lose its assigned office space/locker/mailbox and/or be subject to disciplinary action by the Student Engagement team of Harvard College.

    Exceptions

    The Dean of Students Office may grant exceptions to the rules for ad hoc groups of enrolled students who wish to hold occasional meetings in College rooms. Ad hoc groups of enrolled students may also petition the Office for permission to poster on campus. Groups petitioning must list at least ten enrolled students and include a contact name on the poster.

    It will be understood that these ad hoc groups must observe the regulations of the College and the policies of the Faculty in the use of Harvard facilities and, in particular, must be autonomous of outside organizations. They may not act to endanger the tax-exempt status of the University nor fail to comply with its policies regarding non-discrimination and harassment.

    Exceptions to the Regulations may be granted only by petition to the Dean of Students Office.

    Student Activities Fee

    The Student Activities Fee of $200 added to all College students’ accounts is used to fund student organizations, and support student life activities and operations for all Harvard College students. In order to waive the Student Activities Fee, please write a letter and deliver or mail it no later than September 30, 2019, to:

    Harvard University Student Accounts Office
    Smith Campus Center 953
    1350 Massachusetts Avenue
    Cambridge, MA 02138

    Include your full name, Harvard ID, and reason for opting out. All requests will be honored. Students charged the Student Activities Fee in the spring semester should contact the Student Accounts Office by February 1, 2020 in order to waive the fee.

    Financial Information

    Tuition and Fees 2019-2020

    Tuition 

    $47,730

    Students granted an Additional Term pay tuition at a per course rate (see Additional Term).

     

    Student Health Fee

    $1,206

    Student Health Insurance Plan

    Blue Cross Blue Shield Hospital/Specialty and Express Scripts Prescription Drug Coverage

    Students may be eligible to waive one or both parts of HUSHP coverage. Waiver requests must be submitted online by July 31 for the fall term or full academic year and by January 31 for the spring term. For more information, visit hushp.harvard.edu.

    $3,700

    Room Rent

    $10,927

    Student Services Fee

    $2,989

    Charged to all students (including students studying out of residence during the term for Harvard degree credit).

     

    Board

    $6,755

    Student Activities Fee

    $200

    A fee charged to all students to fund student life activities and operations, to fund student organizations (see Student Activities Fee). In order to waive the Student Activities Fee, students must write a letter requesting a waiver of the fee and mail or deliver it to: University Student Financial Services Office, 801 Smith Campus Center, 1350 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138 by September 30th for the Fall semester. For students returning from leave in the Spring semester, the letter requesting a waiver must be received by February 1st of the spring semester.

     

    Late Fees and Fees for Special Petitions

    Late Check-In $50
       
    Change of Course (per petition) $10
       
    Late Course Registration (weekly charge until course registration is completed) $40

    Replacement and Laboratory Fees

    Laboratory Fees Each student enrolled in a laboratory course is charged for
    breakage, damage, loss of apparatus, and supplies used.
    HUID Card each $25
    Room Keys: replacement during term time each $20
    Room Keys: not returned at time of departure each $50
    Lock Change $150

    Payment Procedures

    Payment Policy

    Amount Due

    Monthly Payment Plan

    Payment Procedures

    Late Payment of Term Bills

    Information for Degree Candidates

    Acceleration

    Dishonored Payments

    Information for Students Leaving the College

    Payment Policy

    Students are responsible for payment of their charges for tuition and fees. This responsibility includes reviewing your student account on my.harvard upon receipt of an account notification each month and making sure that payments are made by the due dates. Students must ensure that parents and others who make payments on their behalf are able to access the student account. Tuition and fees must be paid in full in order for students to enroll in classes each term. The College may deny enrollment to those students whose charges are not paid by the established deadlines. Payments for Commencement, and the November and March degree periods, must also be made by the designated due dates. No degree can be conferred until all indebtedness to the University is paid in full. Additional charges that may be added to the student account after degrees are conferred must also be paid in full.

    Amount Due

    The amount due includes all charges on your student account on my.harvard that have not been paid, and are not being covered by Anticipated Aid. Email notifications are sent when new charges are added to the account, or when charges are due within the next two weeks. Charges for the fall term are added to the student account in July with a payment due date in mid-August. Spring term charges are added to the account in December and due in January. Upon receipt of the first account notification, students are expected to review the transactions and set up parents and all others (besides sponsors) who need access to the account as delegates. Once set up, delegates will also receive account notifications. More detailed information is available at the University Student Financial Services website or by calling 617-495-2739. 

    Monthly Payment Plan

    The University offers a monthly payment plan that allows eligible students to pay tuition and required fees in four monthly installments each term. Under this plan, fall term installments are due in August, September, October, and November. Spring term installments are due in January, February, March, and April. There is a $35 charge per term for use of this plan.

    Any balance due from a prior term must be paid in full before students can enroll in the payment plan. Once enrolled, payment plan installments must be paid by the due date each month. Students who do not pay their installments on time may not be permitted to continue to use the payment plan.

    You can enroll in the monthly payment plan on my.harvard from your student account. For more information on the payment plan go to the University Student Financial Services website.

    Payment Procedures

    Detailed information about accepted forms of payment can be found at the University Student Financial Services website. All payments must be made in US currency and electronic payments must be drawn from US banks. We encourage you to make an e-payment from your student account whenever possible, as it will be applied to your account immediately. Checks made payable to Harvard University can be delivered or mailed to the Student Accounts Office at 801 Smith Campus Center, 1350 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138. To ensure that all payments are properly credited, checks should always reference the student HUID.

    E-payments - E-payment from the student account is the fastest and preferred way to make a payment. You can make an e-payment from a U.S. checking or savings account by logging into your student account and choosing the Pay Now link below your Amount Due. You will need the account number and bank routing number of your account to make the payment. You can also set up a payment profile to store your account information for future use. In order for parents or others to make e-payments, you must set them up as a delegate here.

    Foreign wire payments - Harvard University contracts with both Western Union and Flywire to provide international students with a convenient way to pay their student account charges by wire transfer. Each company offers various payment methods, a wide range of international currency options, competitive exchange rates, and the convenience of paying through a local bank. There are no transaction fees from Harvard University's bank, though your bank may charge a fee.

    To make an international wire transfer through Western Union, click here.

    To make a transfer through Flywire, click here.

     

    Domestic Wires - Western Union has been contracted to expedite the processing of student domestic wire transfers directly to Harvard. By using Western Union, Harvard can track your payment more efficiently and make sure it gets posted directly to your account after the University receives it. To make a domestic wire transfer, click here.

    Please note that although wires are sometimes subject to fees, neither Harvard University nor its bank charges for the receipt of wire transfers. International wires are subject to a fee from an intermediary bank between the sending and the receiving banks. Please check with your bank to determine what fees may apply to your wire transfer and be sure to adjust the amount of your transfer accordingly.

    Late Payment of Tuition and Fees

    Charges for tuition and fees must be paid in full by the due dates indicated on the student account. Any student whose indebtedness to the University remains unpaid after the designated payment due dates may be deprived of the privileges of the University. Reinstatement is possible only after all charges have been paid and consent of the Dean is obtained.

    Additionally, Students who leave the University with an amount due on their student account and who fail to make acceptable payment arrangements to bring their account current, may be referred to a collection agency. It is further understood that students may be responsible for paying a collection agency fee, which may be based on a percentage at a maximum of 40% percent of their delinquent balance, plus all costs and expenses, including reasonable attorney’s fees, necessary for the collection of their delinquent account. Finally it is understood that their delinquent account may be reported to one or more of the national credit bureaus.

    Information for Degree Candidates

    Students who have applied for graduation must pay any outstanding amount due to the University by the designated due date in order for degrees to be conferred. Additional charges that may be added to the student account after degrees are conferred must also be paid in full.

    Acceleration

    Students who have completed degree requirements in fewer terms than the number required had they worked at an average rate of 16 credits (4 courses per term, 4 credits per course) may petition the Resident Dean for waiver of the residence requirement. (See also Residence Requirement, Rate of Work, and Study Abroad.)

    An accelerated degree program has serious and sometimes complex academic implications. Students should have a discussion with their Resident Dean before undertaking such a plan.

    Dishonored Payments

    A $25 fee is assessed for payments returned by Harvard University's bank. A payment is returned unpaid by the bank due to insufficient funds, no bank account being found, or because it has been stopped by the payer. After the initial return, the University may also require that future payments be made by certified check or money order. 

    Information for Students Leaving the College

    Students who leave the College for any reason must pay all due charges on their student account. Students who leave during the academic year are charged tuition and the Student Services fee to the end of the period in which they leave; room rent and board charges are calculated on a daily basis (see Students’ Financial Obligations in the Event of a Leave of Absence or Requirement to Withdraw).

    The chart does not include any charges for the Harvard University Student Health Insurance Program. Separate policies apply to these fees; additional information regarding changes for Student Health Services fee or Blue Cross Blue Shield insurance can be found at www.hushp.harvard.edu. Room rent charges continue to the day the student leaves College residence. Full-board charges will continue to the day the student submits the proper paperwork to their House office or the Dean of Students Office. The room key must also be returned to the House Office or building manager’s office.

    The fee schedule also applies to those students who move off-campus during the academic year; however, the complete Student Services Fee continues to be assessed. For those students who do not fall into the category of a leave of absence, requirement to withdraw, or move off-campus but who are absent from Cambridge for whatever reason, room and board charges continue to be assessed through the end of term.

    Students' Financial Obligations in the Event . . .

    Students’ Financial Obligations in the Event of a Leave of Absence or Requirement to Withdraw

    If Student Leaves (determined by effective date)

     Tuition

     S.S. Fee †

     Board

    Fall Term 2019

    On or before May 18

     

     -0-

     

     -0-

     

     -0-

    From May 19 to June 30

     -0-

     181.50

     -0-

    From July 1 to Sept 9

     -0-

     272.00

     pro-rated

    From Sept. 10 to Oct. 7

     5,966.25

     373.63

     pro-rated

    From Oct. 8 to Oct. 28

     11,932.50

     747.25

     pro-rated

    From Oct. 29 to Dec. 4

     17,898.75

     1,120.87

     pro-rated

    After December 4

     23,865.00

     1,494.50

     3,377.50

     

    Spring Term 2020

    On or before Mon., Nov. 11 (10th Monday of the term)

     

     -0-

     

     -0-

     

     -0-

    From Nov. 12 to Jan. 1

     -0-

     181.50

     -0-

    From Jan. 2 to Jan. 31

     -0-

     272.00

     pro-rated

    From Feb. 1 to Feb. 24

     5,966.25

     373.63

     pro-rated

    From Feb. 25 to Mar. 31

     11,932.5

     747.25

     pro-rated

    From Apr. 1 to Apr. 30

     17,898.75

     1,120.87

     pro-rated

    After Apr. 30

     23,865.00

     1,494.50

     3,377.50

    All amounts are in US dollars. Harvard in its sole discretion reserves the right to change these rates at any time upon 30 days prior notice to students.

    * For Dudley Cooperative meal plan charges, inquire in the Dudley Community Office, 10 DeWolfe Street, Suites 22 and 23 (617-495-2256).

    † Student Services Fee.

    Housing Cancellation Fees

    Students cancelling their housing for a future term are subject to cancellation fees if the leave of absence is voluntary. You may find the breakdown of housing fees here (See: Financial Obligations). Please inquire in the Dean of Students Office with questions about charges for a future term.

    Because of student feedback that cancellation fee deadlines were confusing and did not align with other deadlines, we have adjusted our fee schedule starting with the Fall 2018 term.

    Fall Term 2019
    On or before May 20, 2019 $0
    May 21, 2019 - June 17, 2019 $200
    June 18, 2019 - July 15, 2019 $300
    July 16, 2019 - August 12, 2019 $400
    August 13, 2019 - September 10, 2019 $500
    September 11, 2019 - December 3, 2019 $58.75/per diem
    After December 3, 2019 $5,463.50
     
    Spring Term 2020
    On or before November 11, 2019 $0
    November 12, 2019 - November 30, 2019 $200
    December 1, 2019 - December 22, 2019 $300
    December 23, 2019 - January 13, 2020 $400
    January 14, 2020 - February 5, 2020 $500
    February 6, 2020 - May 1, 2020 $58.75/per diem
    After May 1, 2020 $5,463.50

    (*The per diem charge is calculated based on the number of days from the first day of classes until the day you move out and return your key. Dudley co-op students will continue to pay the $500 cancellation fee until the per-diem rate breaks even with the $500 fee and is approximately 70% of the usual house rate).

    We are unable to waive cancellation fees except in the most extraordinary circumstances. Per the Harvard College Handbook for Students: "Fees for late housing cancellation, late check-in, late course registration, and change-of-course petitions are waived only when the University is responsible for the difficulty or when the situation involves a serious illness of the student (usually including hospitalization) or a death in the student’s immediate family" (https://handbook.fas.harvard.edu/book/late-fees).

    Students are encouraged to cancel their housing as soon as possible so that students can be taken off the wait list and so that houses can plan lottery and room assignments accordingly.

    Financial Aid

    Committee on Admissions and Financial Aid
    Mon.–Fri., 9 am–5 pm
    86 Brattle Street
    Tel: 617-495-1581
    https://college.harvard.edu/financial-aid
    faoinfo@fas.harvard.edu

    The Committee on Admissions and Financial Aid strives to make a Harvard education affordable for all admitted students. Financial aid awards are need-based and consist of grants and employment.

    Conditions Governing Financial Aid Awards

     

    1. Neither the amount of institutional financial aid granted nor the amount lent to any student shall be altered during any given academic year because of changes in the student’s academic or disciplinary status, so long as the student is permitted to remain at the College. However, adjustments in the amount of financial aid awarded may be made at any time in response to unanticipated changes in a student’s financial circumstances or additional information received about resources or expenses.
    2. The nature and amount of financial aid to be awarded for the following academic year will be reviewed each summer, taking into account the financial need and the academic progress of the individual student and the resources available to the Committee on Admissions and Financial Aid.
    3. All financial aid awards are based on demonstrated need, and students seeking assistance must file a renewal application each year. Renewal application instructions are emailed to students in February and completed application forms are due May 1. Students must comply with the May 1 deadline in order to be assured of continued financial aid eligibility. The Committee on Financial Aid will not consider applications for assistance after August 1 without an appeal in writing.
    4. If an award holder takes a leave of absence or is required to withdraw before completing the period covered by the award, an adjustment of the award will be necessary. That part of the award used to cover educational costs may reduce students' eligibility for scholarship aid in their final term.
    5. If an award holder takes a leave of absence after an award has been made, but before completing the check-in process for the academic year, the award will be canceled. Students may apply for an award when they are ready to return to the College. Returning students will be expected to produce the standard summer savings amount towards their next academic year expenses. Students returning from a leave should be aware that all loan repayments and/or term bill obligations must be current before any financial aid can be granted.
    6. Students returning to the College after an interval of five or more years will ordinarily not be eligible for scholarship aid from institutional sources. Exceptions because of unusual circumstances will be considered by the Committee on Financial Aid with input from the Administrative Board. Petitions for an exception should be made through the Griffin Financial Aid Office.
    7. Awards are available only if the holder is regularly registered in the College as an undergraduate. The Committee will normally reduce the amount of the award if holders choose to live at the home of their parents during the academic year; study abroad for credit at a reduced cost; or are granted permission by the Administrative Board to work and pay at a reduced course rate.
    8. Students may normally receive no more than eight terms of financial aid. If a student has taken a leave in the middle of a term and used a portion of their financial aid eligibility, they will need to petition the Financial Aid Committee to be considered for full eligibility for their final term.
    9. Award holders must notify the Griffin Financial Aid Office of any change in residence during the academic year for which they have an award.
    10. Award holders are required to notify the Griffin Financial Aid Office of any substantial change in their financial resources for the year, such as receipt of additional outside scholarship assistance. The Committee reserves the right to review the award in the event of a change in the student’s resources.
    11. Students who have borrowed from loan funds must report to the Griffin Financial Aid Office for an exit interview prior to graduation or at the time of a leave of absence or requirement to withdraw.

    Basis of Original Award

    Scholarships are awarded to students who need financial assistance in order to pursue their course of studies. Awards are based solely on need and the Committee on Financial Aid makes the final determination of family need. Annual awards range from $500 to more than $68,000.

    All awards are made annually on the basis of financial need as demonstrated through a variety of forms, including the College Scholarship Service PROFILE and the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Financial need is determined in accordance with federal guidelines, and following the general procedures of the College Scholarship Service and the assessment guidelines established by the Committee on Financial Aid. Detailed information regarding financial aid awards and procedures can be found on the financial aid website

    Reapplication of Financial Aid after First Year

    Students in the College must file an application each year to reapply for financial aid. Renewal aid application materials are described on the financial aid website at https://college.harvard.edu/financial-aid/applying-aid/current-students. The nature and amount of financial aid to be awarded for the following academic year will be reviewed each summer, taking into account the financial need and the academic progress of the individual student and the resources available to the Committee on Admissions and Financial Aid.

    Applications for aid are considered carefully every year for changes in financial need, and awards will be adjusted if the family financial resources increase or decrease markedly. The Committee is ready at all times to consider initial or additional requests for assistance from any student in the College whose family encounters financial hardship.

    Expectations Regarding Other Contributions

    Parental Contribution

    The Committee expects parents to provide as much assistance from both income and assets as is feasible, by determination of institutional need analysis guidelines. The Committee also expects parents to provide assistance for the student during the student's entire undergraduate career. When a student’s parents are divorced, both parents are ordinarily required to file financial statements and to provide a portion of the parental contribution. Arbitrary withdrawal of parental support will not ordinarily be met with increased scholarship funds. Students facing irreconcilable differences with their parents should contact the financial aid office to discuss the College’s Independent Student Policy guidelines.

    Parent Loans

    Parents of students in Harvard College have access to various loan plans. Information is available from the Griffin Financial Aid Office website.

    Summer Earnings

    In determining eligibility for scholarship assistance, the Committee expects that students will save up to $2,600 of their summer job earnings to be contributed toward the educational expenses of the following year. This expectation cannot be waived for students choosing to volunteer or participate in unpaid internships, although there are subsidized student loan funds available on request to cover this expectation.

    Students’ Own Savings

    In assessing student resources, the Griffin Financial Aid Office will ordinarily ask that a small percentage of students’ savings be used to pay for college costs.

    Outside Scholarships

    Students receiving scholarship assistance are required to report to the Griffin Financial Aid Office any outside scholarships they receive through the Outside Award Reporting System (OARS). Notifying another office at Harvard (i.e., the Student Accounts Office) of the receipt of an outside award does not satisfy this requirement. Outside scholarships are first used to replace the job expectation in the financial aid package, and can fully replace the summer savings expectation. Only if the amount of outside scholarships exceeds the combined job and summer savings expectations will the Harvard Scholarship be reduced.

    Nonresident, Married, and Out-of-Residence Students

    Nonresident Students

    The charges for nonresident students are Tuition and Student Services and Health Services Fees. Students who receive permission to live off-campus are assumed by the Griffin Financial Aid Office to have the same room, board, and personal expenses as students living on campus. Students desiring to live off-campus may want to consider the fact that actual off-campus costs may be higher than on-campus expenses.

    Married Students

    The College has no scholarship funds with which to provide extra help to married students. It is the policy of the Griffin Financial Aid Office to treat married students as if they are nonresident single students, expecting the student’s parents or spouse to provide the necessary extra support. In some cases, additional loan and/or job assistance may be available.

    Students Studying Out of Residence

    Students studying at other institutions during the academic year who are receiving credit toward Harvard degrees will ordinarily be eligible for financial aid in accordance with the usual conditions.

    Summer School

    Students who are eligible for need-based financial aid from Harvard, and are attending Harvard Summer School, may apply for loan assistance from the Griffin Financial Aid Office. Students choosing to attend Summer School are cautioned that the Committee will not waive their summer savings expectation. Some limited scholarship funding for summer study abroad is available through the Office of International Education with limited need-based loans coordinated through the Griffin Financial Aid Office.

     

    Refund Policy

    If a student who is receiving any form of financial aid takes a leave of absence or is required to withdraw, the refund of institutional funds will be based on the amount of tuition and fees abated and that amount will be returned to the financial aid fund. A special refund rule applies to these funds: Federal Direct Student and Parent Loans, Federal Pell Grants, Federal Supplemental Education Grants, and Massachusetts State Grants. These Title IV federal and state funds will be returned to the agencies based on the amount for which the student is no longer eligible. Copies of these refund policies are available upon request from the Griffin Financial Aid Office.

    Federal Verification

    Harvard University participates in the US Department of Education’s Federal Verification Program which may require additional documentation of certain data elements reported on a student’s FAFSA form.

    Statement of Privacy

    All information submitted for the purpose of securing financial aid is protected under Harvard’s Enterprise Security policy, the Federal Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), and the Gramm-Leach Bliley Act of 2000 (GLB). Under these provisions, Harvard ensures the privacy and safeguarding of all financial aid information. For additional information, please contact the Griffin Financial Aid Office at 617-495-1581.

    Fields of Concentration

    African and African American Studies

    Professor Suzanne Blier, Director of Undergraduate Studies

    The Department of African and African American Studies brings together scholars and scholarship from many disciplines to explore the histories, societies, and cultures of African and African-descended people. The field of African and African American studies is not only interdisciplinary but also comparative and cross-cultural. Africans and people of African descent have developed cultural forms that have profoundly shaped the fine arts and popular culture in the Americas and all around the planet. Comparative and cross-cultural studies of Africa and its diaspora contribute enormously to our understanding of race and ethnicity, and ideas about race are among the central objects of study in the field of African and African American studies. In addressing the ethical, social, and political consequences of racial thinking, the African and African American studies faculty raise questions relevant to the experiences of all peoples.

    The department offers two distinct courses of study: the African track and the African American track. African track concentrators come to the program with a variety of interests (e.g., the environment, public health, music, ethnic relations, religion, politics, economic development, and literature). Components of the African track include study in the African Languages Program, required courses, electives, and the option of study abroad. The department offers seminars and lecture courses on a variety of Africa-related topics. Concentrators in the African track are encouraged to take courses in a variety of departments, including history of art and architecture, music, economics, government, history, anthropology, social studies, Romance languages and literatures, and religion. Courses in the Divinity School, the Graduate School of Education, and Kennedy School of Government may also be available for concentration credit.

    The African American track attracts students with an equally wide range of interests. There are many reasons students pursue African American Studies. First, African American music, literature, and visual arts are significant cultural achievements worthy of study in their own right. Second, African Americans have played a crucial role in the history of the United States, participating in the American Revolution, the Civil War, Reconstruction, women’s suffrage, and the New Deal; and they led the struggle for equality in the second half of the twentieth century. Third, because American political life remains encumbered by racism and its historical legacy, a proper historical, sociological, and economic understanding of race relations continues to be essential for those who seek to make or evaluate public policy. Fourth, some of the social relations that have developed in countries such as the United States, Cuba, Jamaica, Haiti, and Brazil provide important examples of ethno-racial conflict, and through the study of them it is possible to gain insight into what remains a problem across the globe.

    Exploring African and African American cultures requires us to explore aspects of the many other cultures and peoples that have created the mosaic of the modern world. Thus, diaspora studies are integral to each track. In many parts of the Caribbean and Latin America, for example, religions and performance arts are influenced by traditional African belief systems and practices. The cultures of the African Atlantic diaspora have also developed in interaction with other peoples: the many Native American cultures; the Dutch, English, French, German, Irish, Italian, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Scandinavian, Scottish, Spanish, and other European groups that came with colonists and immigrants; and with the traditions that have come with immigrants from East and South Asia.

    Students who graduate with a concentration in African and African American Studies go on to pursue advanced degrees in fields such as history, literature, political science, and sociology. They also go on to work in a wide variety of careers in education, business, medicine, entertainment, law, public policy, and the arts and sciences.

    REQUIREMENTS
    African Studies Track
    Basic Requirements: 12 courses (48 credits)

    1. Required Courses:
      1. AAAS 11: Introduction to African Studies. Students should take this course by the end of their junior year. (Students who transfer into the concentration after their sophomore year will be permitted to substitute for AAAS 11 a course in African studies they have already taken, but only if they can demonstrate to the Director of Undergraduate Studies that they have established a basic familiarity with the material covered in AAAS 11.)
      2. AAAS 10: Introduction to African American Studies. Students should take this course by the end of their junior year. (Students who transfer into the concentration after their sophomore year will be permitted to substitute for AAAS 10 a course in African and African American studies they have already taken, but only if they can demonstrate to the Director of Undergraduate Studies that they have established a basic familiarity with the materials covered in AAAS 10.)
      3. Two courses of an African language. The language requirement is met by attaining a level of competence equivalent to two courses of African language study. Students who can show evidence at the beginning of their concentration that they have a level of competence equivalent to two courses of African language study will be required to substitute other courses offered in the department. Language courses taken outside of Harvard may be substituted upon approval by the Director of the African Language Program and the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
      4. A course in pre-20th century African history. (Students must select from a pre-approved list of courses available on the Department's website or petition the Director of Undergraduate Studies for a substitution.) A course in African history. (Students must select from a pre-approved list of courses available on the Department's website or petition the Director of Undergraduate Studies for a substitution.)
      5. Five courses in African studies, with at least one in the social sciences and one in the humanities. (These courses need not be given in the department.) In selecting these three courses, students should declare a focus. Some students will declare a disciplinary focus or more general focus in the humanities or social sciences; others will choose an area focus or thematic methodological or comparative focus (e.g., comparative literary or historical analysis, comparative economic and political development). These are not the only possibilities, but students are required to make a coherent case for the course of electives they choose.
    2. Tutorials:
      1. Sophomore Tutorial: AAAS 97: Race, Class, and Colonialism in Africa and the Americas. (Restricted to concentrators and others by permission of instructor.)
      2. Junior Tutorial: AAAS 98a, an individual course tutorial that focuses on an African studies topic.
    3. Other information:
      1. Pass/Fail: No course used for the concentration may be taken Pass/Fail, with the exception of AAAS 99.
      2. Teaching: Concentrators may be eligible to obtain certification to teach in middle or secondary schools in Massachusetts and states with which Massachusetts has reciprocity. See information about the Undergraduate Teacher Education Program (UTEP).
      3. Students can take AAAS 11 and 97 in succeeding terms starting in their freshman or sophomore year, and then proceed to do individual tutorials in the junior year. Nevertheless, the tutorial program is designed to allow great flexibility; students who declare late may take AAAS 97 concurrently with AAAS 11, for example. Concentrators may be permitted to substitute for AAAS 11, if they declare late.
      4. Study Abroad: Students are encouraged to explore the options available for study in Africa, either during the regular academic year or the summer. It is recommended that students study abroad in the spring term of their junior year. In either case they must get approval of their plan of study from the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies.

    Requirements for Honors Eligibility: 12-14 courses (48-56 credits)

    1. Required courses: Same as Basic Requirements.
    2. Tutorials:
      1. Same as Basic Requirements.
      2. Same as Basic Requirements.
      3. Senior year: One year of AAAS 99: Senior Thesis Workshop required (see below).
    3. Thesis: Required for eligibility for High and Highest Honors. A student who has not written a thesis but has attained a GPA of at least 3.9 in twelve concentration courses may be recommended for Honors (but not High or Highest Honors).
    4. Other information: Same as Basic Requirements.

    Requirements for Joint Concentration: 8 courses (32 credits), including thesis

    1. Required courses:
      1. AAAS 11: Introduction to African Studies.
      2. A course in African history. (Students must select from a pre-approved list of courses available on the Department's website or petition the Director of Undergraduate Studies for a substitution.)
      3. Two courses of an African language. Students who intend to conduct thesis research in Africa are encouraged to continue African language instruction beyond the first year.
    2. Tutorials:
      1. Sophomore Tutorial: AAAS 97: Race, Class, and Colonialism in Africa and the Americas. (Restricted to concentrators and others by permission of instructor.)
      2. Junior Tutorial: AAAS 98a or junior tutorial equivalent in primary concentration if African and African American Studies is the allied concentration.
      3. Senior year: One year of AAAS 99 required, if African and African American Studies is the primary concentration. If African and African American Studies is the allied concentration, the student should register for the thesis tutorial in the primary concentration.
    3. Thesis: Required. Thesis must be related to both fields. Both departments will participate in evaluating the thesis.
    4. Other information: Same as Basic Requirements.

    Concentration requirements for the Joint Concentration in History and African and African American Studies (African Studies track): 14 courses (56 credits)

    1. Study of an African language (2 courses).
    2. AAAS 11
    3. Sophomore Tutorial: History 97 and AAAS 97
    4. AAAS 98
    5. One History Research seminar focused on Africa and resulting in a 20-page research paper based on primary sources
    6. Senior thesis tutorial: History 99 or AAAS 99 (full year)
    7. 5 courses in History and AAAS Studies which must include:
      1. One U.S. or European history course
      2. One pre-modern history course
      3. Three courses in African / AAAS history (one must be a modern African history course)

    Please also note the following information:

    Two types of courses count automatically toward AAAS/History concentration requirements:

    1. Courses listed in the course catalogue's "History" section and historical courses in the catalogue's "AAAS" section, as determined in consultation with the History DUS.
    2. Courses taught in the General Education and/or Freshman Seminar programs by members of the History or AAAS Department Faculty. Students wishing to count such courses toward their concentration requirements should consult the Undergraduate Office, as they may need to file a petition requiring approval by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students may also apply to do an independent study, or History 91r, with a member of the Department; History 91r can be used to fulfill one of the elective course requirements.

    The joint concentration also regularly accepts credit from Study Abroad toward concentration requirements. With the exception of certain Freshman Seminars taught by History or AAAS faculty (see above), courses taken on Pass/Fail basis may not be counted for concentration credit.

     

    African American Studies Track
    Basic Requirements: 12 courses (48 credits)

    1. Required courses:
      1. AAAS 10: Introduction to African American Studies. Students should take this course by the end of their junior year. (Students who transfer into the concentration after their sophomore year will be permitted to substitute for AAAS 10 a course in African and African American studies they have already taken, but only if they can demonstrate to the Director of Undergraduate Studies that they have established a basic familiarity with the materials covered in AAAS 10.)
      2. AAAS 11: Introduction to African Studies. Students should take this course by the end of their junior year. (Students who transfer into the concentration after their sophomore year will be permitted to substitute for AAAS 11 a course in African studies they have already taken, but only if they can demonstrate to the Director of Undergraduate Studies that they have established a basic familiarity with the material covered in AAAS 11.)
      3. A course in 18th or 19th Century African American history that engages substantially the history of slavery. (Students must select from a pre-approved list of courses available on the Department's website or petition the Director of Undergraduate Studies for a substitution.
      4. Seven additional courses in African American or diaspora studies, at least one of which must be in the humanities and one in the social sciences. (These courses need not be given in the department.) Some students will declare a disciplinary focus or a more general focus in humanities or social sciences; others will choose an area of focus in African American or Afro-Caribbean cultures; still others will elect a thematic, methodological, or comparative focus (e.g., comparative ethnic studies, comparative literary analysis, urban studies). These are not the only possibilities, but students should be prepared to make a coherent case for the course of electives they select.
    2. Tutorials:
      1. Sophomore Tutorial: AAAS 97: Race, Class, and Colonialism in Africa and the Americas. (Restricted to concentrators and others by permission of the instructor.)
      2. Junior Tutorial: AAAS 98, an individual course tutorial that focuses on an African American studies topic.
    3. Other information:
      1. Pass/Fail: No course used for the concentration may be taken Pass/Fail, with the exception of AAAS 99.
      2. Teaching: Concentrators may be eligible to obtain certification to teach in middle or secondary schools in Massachusetts and states with which Massachusetts has reciprocity. See information about the Undergraduate Teacher Education Program (UTEP).
      3. Students can take AAAS 10 and 97 in succeeding terms starting in their freshman or sophomore year, and then proceed to do individual tutorials in the junior year. Nevertheless, the tutorial program is designed to allow great flexibility; students who declare late may take AAAS 97 concurrently with AAAS 10, for example. Concentrators may be permitted to substitute for AAAS 10, if they declare late.

    Requirements for Honors Eligibility: 12-14 courses (48-56 credits)

    1. Required courses: Same as Basic Requirements.
    2. Tutorials:
      1. Same as Basic Requirements.
      2. Same as Basic Requirements.
      3. Senior year: One year of AAAS 99: Senior Thesis Workshop required (see below).
    3. Thesis: Required for eligibility for High and Highest Honors. A student who has not written a thesis but has attained a GPA of at least 3.9 in twelve concentration courses may be recommended for Honors (but not High or Highest Honors).
    4. Other information: Same as Basic Requirements.

    Requirements for Joint Concentration (Honors only): 8 courses (32 credits), including thesis

    1. Required courses:
      1. AAAS 10: Introduction to African American Studies.
      2. A course in 18th or 19th Century African American history that engages substantially the history of slavery. (Students must select from a pre-approved list of courses available on the Department's website or petition the Director of Undergraduate Studies for a substitution.)
      3. Two courses in African American or diaspora studies, one in the humanities and one in the social sciences.
    2. Tutorials:
      1. Sophomore Tutorial: AAAS 97: Race, Class, and Colonialism in Africa and the Americas. (Restricted to concentrators and others by permission of the instructor.)
      2. Junior Tutorial: AAAS 98 or junior tutorial equivalent in primary concentration if African and African American Studies is the allied concentration.
      3. Senior year: One year of AAAS 99 required, if African and African American Studies is the primary concentration. If African and African American Studies is the allied concentration, the student should register for the thesis tutorial in the primary concentration.
    3. Thesis: Required. Thesis must be related to both fields. Both departments will participate in evaluating the thesis.
    4. Other information:
      1. Pass/Fail: No course used for the concentration may be taken Pass/Fail, with the exception of AAAS 99.
      2. Students can take AAAS 10, and 97 in succeeding terms starting in their freshman or sophomore year, and then proceed to do individual tutorials in the junior year. Nevertheless, the tutorial program is designed to allow great flexibility: students who declare late may take AAAS 97 concurrently with AAAS 10, for example. Concentrators may be permitted to substitute for AAAS 10, if they declare late.

    Concentration requirements for the Joint Concentration in History and African and African American Studies (African American Studies track): 14 courses (56 credits)

    1. AAAS 10 (Introduction to African American Studies);
    2. Two courses in African American Studies— one in humanities, one in social sciences
    3. One course in African American History pre-20th century (if not available consult DUS)
    4. Sophomore tutorials: History 97 and AAAS 97

    5. One History Research Seminar (ideally focused on African American History) and resulting in a research paper of at least 20 pages based on primary sources
    6. AAAS 98

    7. Senior thesis tutorial: History 99 or AAAS 99 (full year)
    8. 4 courses in History and AAAS Studies. These must include:
      1. one pre-modern History course

      2. Three African/AAAS history courses, of which one must be a modern African history course

    Please also note the following information:

    Two types of courses count automatically toward AAAS/History concentration requirements:

    1. Courses listed in the course catalogue's "History" section and historical courses in the catalogue's "AAAS" section, as determined in consultation with the History DUS.
    2. Courses taught in the General Education and/or Freshman Seminar programs by members of the History or AAAS Department Faculty. Students wishing to count such courses toward their concentration requirements should consult the Undergraduate Office, as they may need to file a petition requiring approval by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students may also apply to do an independent study, or History 91r, with a member of the Department; History 91r can be used to fulfill one of the elective course requirements.

    The joint concentration also regularly accepts credit from Study Abroad toward concentration requirements. With the exception of certain Freshman Seminars taught by History or AAAS faculty (see above), courses taken on Pass/Fail basis may not be counted for concentration credit.

     

    ADVISING

    Beginning in the sophomore year, concentrators will work directly with their individual advisers and with the Director of Undergraduate Studies to create a plan of study that meets their academic interests. The department requires that students develop a focus as part of their declaration of the concentration. This plan of study will take cognizance of disciplinary requirements and the option of study abroad, yet it will be flexible enough to accommodate students in pursuit of their own specific intellectual interests. At the end of the sophomore year, students are asked to submit a 1-2 page Concentration Focus Statement describing the main area(s) of study they wish to explore. The Director of Undergraduate Studies will meet with students, if they request, in order to assist them in the formulation of the statement of concentration focus.

    For up-to-date information on advising in African and African American Studies, please see the Advising Programs Office website.

    RESOURCES

    The Franklin D. and Wendy F. Raines Library, in the Department of African and African American Studies, is located on the second floor of the Barker Center and contains a non-circulating collection of important books, academic and popular periodicals, and offprints, as well as an extensive audio and video collection. Past undergraduate theses are also available. An important resource for African Studies concentrators is the Committee on African Studies, which offers summer travel grants to assist Harvard juniors with senior honors thesis research. Please see their website for more information. They can also guide you to resources in teaching, research, and advisory work on Africa in a number of departments, centers, and institutes at Harvard. Harvard’s Office of International Education has approved study abroad in eleven African countries. To plan their term in Africa students should meet with the Director of the Office of International Programs.

    HOW TO FIND OUT MORE

    Students should consult the departmental website, which includes information about concentration rules, the senior thesis, model programs, faculty interests, and departmental resources. Additional information is available from the Director of Undergraduate Studies Suzanne Blier (blier@fas.harvard.edu) or the Undergraduate and Graduate Program Officer (617-495-8545). The department is located on the second floor of the Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street.

     

    ENROLLMENT STATISTICS
    Number of Concentrators as of December

    Concentrators 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
    African and African American Studies 21 19 11 13 15 11 9 11 6 6
    African and African American Studies + another field           3 1 6 3 6 7 4 0 2 2
    Another field + African and African American Studies 8 5 6 8 10 15 14 10 11 12

     

     

    Anthropology

    Dr. Rowan K. Flad, Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUS)

    Anthropology brings global, comparative, and holistic views to the study of the human condition, exploring the enormous range of similarities and differences across time and space. It includes the study of how human behavior has evolved as well as how language, culture, and society have shaped and continue to shape the human experience.

    The concentration in Anthropology aims to cultivate a critical understanding of this wide ranging experience. To study the human condition is to confront the familiarity of the seemingly strange, and to interrogate the strangeness of that which seems familiar. What does this mean? At the very least, it means stepping back and seeing ourselves the way others might see us – a shift in perspective that is foundational to human empathy and humility. Anthropology also invites deeper analysis of behaviors that we might think we fully understand but that have histories and complexities that only reveal themselves to careful investigation. This is why we do long term field research in local languages to understand social life in all its richness and depth. And finally, making the familiar strange demands an ethical and political accounting. It means not accepting the world as given. This might well be the heart of the discipline, its moral optimism: the conviction that things can be different and better -- and that knowledge about the world should be oriented towards greater empathy, solidarity, and equality. Through an insistence on the importance of context, anthropologists wrestle with the totality of intersections between human practices and behaviors, beliefs, culture, place, politics, identities, and more. Some develop this awareness of cultural and social context into an engaged participation in the contemporary world through politics, work in the public sector, global health policy, journalism, cultural heritage work, the law, advertising or business. For others the study of anthropology provides a foundation for graduate studies in anthropology or related fields.

    At Harvard the Anthropology Department is divided into two programs: Archaeology and Social Anthropology.

    Archaeology investigates the past human condition primarily through the identification, recovery, and analysis of the material remains of ancient peoples in the field and in the laboratory. Goals of archaeology include understanding such developments as the origins of modern humans, the beginnings and spread of agriculture, and the rise and elaboration of complex societies as well as the roles that archaeologically documented pasts play in the modern world.

    Social Anthropology examines the social and cultural diversity of contemporary human experience, practice, and knowledge. Based on various research methods including ethnography, social anthropology provides a critical perspective for better understanding everyday life in a globalized world, and the political, economic, and cultural interconnections within and among the societies of the world.

    All students are strongly encouraged to take the opportunity to study and/or carry out research abroad, and gain a basic knowledge of both subfields (Archaeology and Social Anthropology). Beyond this, most students focus their studies within one of the two programs, meeting the concentration requirements set forward by the particular program concerned. Some students may choose to pursue a combined focus on both approaches, meeting reduced concentration requirements for both Social Anthropology and Archaeology.

    Senior theses are generally supervised within a program, and the tutorials concentrate on problems of research within the subfields of each program. Anthropology concentrators may, however, take tutorials for credit in both programs if they so choose. Field and laboratory research are encouraged although not required.

    While specialization in either Social Anthropology or Archaeology is the most common pattern of study, the Department also encourages interdisciplinary work across programs or between Anthropology and other disciplines. The Anthropology Department allows students to arrange joint concentrations with other FAS departments when appropriate and possible. Such concentrations are restricted to honors candidates and culminate in an interdisciplinary senior thesis. A joint concentration involves an individualized, coherent plan of study approved by both of the departments involved. Harry Lewis, Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science, best described this as “A joint concentration is meant to be a program that integrates two fields and aims towards a research thesis bridging the areas. In other words, a joint concentration in X and Y is meant for people who have an interest in the intersection of X and Y, not just in both X and Y independently.”  The number of required Anthropology courses and basic program requirements may be reduced.

    REQUIREMENTS
    Archaeology
    Basic Requirements: 10 courses (40 credits), including 2 tutorials

    1. Required courses:
      1. Archaeological Method and Theory. Ordinarily met with GenEd 1105 (fall term) or Anthro1010 (prior to 2019)
      2. Five additional Archaeology courses, any level
      3. One Social Anthropology Course
      4. One course related to human evolution. This course must be approved by the DUS or ADUS
    2. Tutorials:
      1. Sophomore year: Anthropology 97x, Sophomore Tutorial in Archaeology (spring term).
      2. Junior year: Anthropology 98a, Junior Tutorial in Anthropology (fall term).
    3. Thesis: None.
    4. General Examination: None.
    5. Other information:
      1. Pass/Fail: Two courses may be taken Pass/Fail and counted toward the concentration. All Anthropology tutorials are letter-graded.
      2. Languages: The department itself has no language requirement. However, the importance of modern languages for research in all branches of Anthropology cannot be too highly stressed. Concentrators who expect to do work in Anthropology beyond the AB degree are most strongly urged to develop their language skills as undergraduates.
      3. Statistics / Archaeological Science: Concentrators in combined Archaeology and Social Anthropology are encouraged to take courses in statistics, archaeological science and/or computer science (including GIS). Competence in handling quantitative data is extremely important in anthropological research, and such competence is best obtained through formal training in statistics and scientific methods.
      4. Study and Research Abroad: Concentrators in Archaeology are encouraged to investigate the possibilities for studying and/or carrying out research abroad during the summer or during the academic year. If a student has received Harvard degree credit for courses taken in a Harvard-approved overseas studies program, that student may petition the DUS or ADUS for permission to count these courses toward the requirements of the Archaeology concentration. Ordinarily up to two courses per semester may be counted for concentration credit.
      5. Field Experience: Concentrators are required to participate in a field experience. While this is not a course requirement, it may be completed by having an experience, training, or internship, including museum internships, for which there is not credit given.

    Requirements for Honors Eligibility: 12 courses (48 credits)
    THESIS TRACK (Honors, High Honors, and Highest Honors attainable)

    1. Required courses:
      1. Archaeological Method and Theory. Ordinarily met with GenEd 1105 (fall term) or Anthro1010 (prior to 2019)
      2. Four additional Archaeology courses, any level
      3. Graduate-Level Research Seminar (2000-level)
      4. One Social Anthropology Course
      5. One course related to human evolution. This course must be approved by the DUS or ADUS
    2. Tutorials:
      1. Sophomore year: Same as Basic Requirements.
      2. Junior year: In addition to Anthropology 98a (fall term), Archaeology honors candidates are strongly encouraged to enroll in Anthropology 98b, an individual Junior Tutorial, normally taken spring term, in which they carry out study and research directly related to the preparation of the senior thesis. Assignments may include a focused literature review, a grant proposal for summer research funding, etc.
      3. Senior year: Anthropology 99 (year-long 8-credit course: letter graded during the Fall term and  SAT/UNSAT during the spring term), culminating in the submission of a senior thesis and related poster, followed by an oral presentation of and examination on the thesis.
    3. Thesis: Yes with Oral Examination.
    4. General Examination: None.
    5. Other information: Same as Basic Requirements. Honors candidates usually carry out research for their senior theses during the summer between their junior and senior years.

    NON-THESIS TRACK

    Graduating seniors in Archaeology who are not thesis candidates and have taken a 2000 level course may be considered for a non-thesis honors recommendation of Honors (but not High or Highest Honors), provided that their concentration grade point averages calculated at the end of their next to last semester are among the highest twenty-five percent of non-thesis candidates in their graduating class.

    Social Anthropology
    Basic Requirements: 10 courses (40 credits), including 2 tutorials

    1. Required courses
      1. Anthropology 1610: Ethnographic Research Methods (fall term)
      2. Four Social Anthropology courses, any level.
      3. Two courses in Anthropology (Social Anthropology or Archaeology).
      4. ​​​One related course: One additional course in Anthropology or in any social sciences field or advanced foreign language. Students may substitute a relevant course in humanities or science fields with approval from the DUS or ADUS.
    2. Tutorials:
      1. Sophomore year: Anthropology 97z, Sophomore Tutorial in Social Anthropology (spring term).
      2. Junior year: Anthropology 98a, Junior Tutorial in Anthropology (fall term).
    3. Thesis: None.
    4. General Examination: None.
    5. Other information:
      1. Pass/Fail: One course may be taken Pass/Fail and counted for concentration credit. This will ordinarily be in the related course category. All Anthropology tutorials are letter-graded.
      2. Language: No (but strongly encouraged).
      3. Study Abroad: Concentrators are strongly encouraged to participate in study abroad or internship programs. If a student has received Harvard degree credit for courses taken in a Harvard-approved overseas studies program, that student may petition the DUS or ADUS for permission to count up to two courses per semester toward the requirements of the concentration.

    Requirements for Honors Eligibility: 12 courses (48 credits)
    THESIS TRACK (Honors, High Honors, and Highest Honors attainable)

    1. Required courses: Same as Basic Requirements.
    2. Tutorials:
      1. Sophomore and Junior years: Same as Basic Requirements.
      2. Junior year: In addition to Anthropology 98a (fall term), Social Anthropology honors candidates are strongly encouraged to enroll in Anthropology 98b, an individual Junior Tutorial, normally taken spring term, in which they carry out study and research related to the preparation of the senior thesis.
      3. Senior year: Anthropology 99 (year-long 8-credit course: letter graded during the Fall term and  SAT/UNSAT during the spring term), culminating in the submission of a senior thesis and an oral examination on that thesis.
    3. Thesis: Yes with Oral Examination.
    4. General Examination: None.
    5. Other information: Same as Basic Requirements. Honors candidates usually carry out research for their senior theses during the summer between their junior and senior years.

    NON-THESIS TRACK

    All graduating seniors in Social Anthropology who are not thesis candidates may be considered for a non-thesis honors recommendation of Honors (but not High or Highest Honors), provided that their concentration grade point averages calculated at the end of their next to last semester are among the highest twenty-five percent of non-thesis candidates in their graduating class.

    Combining Archaeology and Social Anthropology
    Basic Requirements: 10 courses (40 credits), including 3 tutorials

    1. Required courses:
      1. Archaeological Method and Theory. Ordinarily met with GenEd 1105 (fall term) or Anthro1010 (prior to 2019)
      2. Anthropology 1610: Ethnographic Research Methods (fall term)
      3. One course in Archaeology
      4. One Course in Social Anthropology
      5. One Course in Archaeology or Social Anthropology
      6. One Course in Archaeology or Social Anthropology. Graduate Research Seminar (2000-level) encouraged, but not required.
      7. One related course: One additional course in Anthropology or a related discipline, Human Evolutionary Biology, or human evolution. This course must be approved by the DUS or ADUS.
    2. Tutorials:
      1. Sophomore year: Both Archaeology and Social Anthropology Sophomore Tutorials (Anthropology 97x and 97z, two courses, spring term).
      2. Junior year: Anthropology 98a, Junior Tutorial in Anthropology (fall term)
    3. Thesis: None.
    4. General Examination: None.
    5. Other information:
      1. Pass/Fail: Same as Basic Requirements for each program.
      2. Languages: Same as Basic Requirements for each program.
      3. Statistics / Archaeological Science: Concentrators in combined Archaeology and Social Anthropology are encouraged to take courses in statistics, archaeological science and/or computer science (including GIS). Competence in handling quantitative data is extremely important in anthropological research, and such competence is best obtained through formal training in statistics and scientific methods.
      4. Study Abroad: Study abroad is encouraged. Consult the DUS or ADUS.

    Requirements for Honors Eligibility: 12 courses (48 credits)

    THESIS TRACK (Honors, High Honors, and Highest Honors attainable)

    1. Required courses: Same as Basic Requirements.
    2. Tutorials:
      1. Sophomore and Junior years: Same as Basic Requirements.
      2. Anthropology 99: Senior Tutorial (year-long 8-credit course: letter graded during the fall term and  SAT/UNSAT during the spring term), culminating in the submission of a senior thesis and an oral examination on that thesis.
    3. Thesis: Yes with Oral Examination.
    4. General Examination: None.
    5. Other information: Same as Basic Requirements. Prospective honors candidates are strongly encouraged to enroll in Anthropology 98b (spring term). Honors candidates usually carry out research for their senior theses during the summer between their junior and senior years.

    NON-THESIS TRACK

    All graduating seniors in combined archaelogy and social anthropology who are not thesis candidates may be considered for a non-thesis honors recommendation of Honors (but not High or Highest Honors), provided that their concentration grade point averages calculated at the end of their next to last semester are among the highest twenty-five percent of non-thesis candidates in their graduating class.

    Joint Concentrations

    The programs in Archaeology and Social Anthropology of the Department of Anthropology both encourage a joint concentration with any other department that permits a joint concentration. A joint concentration is meant to be a program that integrates two fields and aims towards a research thesis bridging the areas. The Anthropology part of the joint concentration can serve as either the primary or allied field. Consult the DUS or ADUS and the concentration advisor in the allied field for details.

    Archaeology and another field outside of Anthropology

    For the Archaeology portion of the joint concentration, there is a six course requirement.

    1. Required courses:
      1. Archaeological Method and Theory. Ordinarily met with GenEd 1105 (fall term) or Anthro1010 (prior to 2019)
      2. Anthropology 97x: Sophomore Tutorial in Archaeology (spring term).
      3. Anthropology 98a: Junior Tutorial in Anthropology (fall term).
      4. Three additional Archaeology courses, any level
      5. One additional Archaeology course: ordinarily Research Seminar (2000-level) expected
    1. Because a joint concentration is an honors concentration, if Archaeology is the primary field, the following courses are also required: Anthropology 99: Senior Tutorial (year-long 8-credit course: letter graded during the fall term and  SAT/UNSAT during the spring term), culminating in the submission of a senior thesis and an oral examination on that thesis.
    2. Other information: Prospective honors candidates are strongly encouraged to enroll in Anthropology 98b (spring term). Honors candidates usually carry out research for their senior theses during the summer between their junior and senior years.
    3. Field Experience: Archaeology Joint-Concentrators are encouraged to participate in a field experience, but will depend on the nature of the joint-concentration. While this is not a course requirement, it may be completed by having an experience, training, or internship, including museum internships, for which there is not credit given.

    Social Anthropology and another field outside of Anthropology

    The Social Anthropology portion of the joint concentration consists of a six course requirement.

    1. Required courses:
      1. Anthropology 1610: Ethnographic Research Methods (fall term).
      2. Anthropology 97a: Sophomore Tutorial (spring term).
      3. Anthropology 98a: Junior Tutorial (fall term).
      4. Two Social Anthropology courses, any level.
      5. One additional course in Anthropology.
    2. Because a joint concentration is an honors concentration, if Social Anthropology is the primary field, the following courses are also required:
      1. One Social Anthropology course, any level.
      2. One additional course in Anthropology.
      3. Anthropology 99: Senior Tutorial (year-long 8-credit course).
    3. Other information: Prospective honors candidates are strongly encouraged to enroll in Anthropology 98b (spring term). Honors candidates usually carry out research for their senior theses during the summer between their junior and senior years.

    Concentration requirements for the Joint Concentration in History and Anthropology (Archaeology or Social Anthropology track, or both): 14 courses (56 credits)

    1. Four Anthropology Courses (in Social Anthropology or Archeology or a mix of both), including one of either Anthropology 1610 or GenEd 1105 (or Anthro 1010 prior to 2019)
    2. Sophomore tutorials: History 97; Anthropology 97x or 97z
    3. Junior tutorials/seminars: Anthropology 98a; a seminar in History resulting in a 20-page research paper using primary sources
    4. Senior thesis tutorial History 99 or Anthropology 99 (full-year)
    5. Four additional courses
      1. One Western history course
      2. One Pre-modern history course
      3. One Non-Western history course
      4. Another course in History

    Please also note the following information:

    Two types of courses count automatically toward Anthropology/History concentration requirements:

    1. Courses listed in the course catalogue's "History" section and historical courses in the catalogue's "Anthropology" section, as determined in consultation with the History DUS.
    2. Courses taught in the General Education and/or Freshman Seminar programs by members of the History or Anthropology Department Faculty. Students wishing to count such courses toward their concentration requirements should consult the Undergraduate Office, as they may need to file a petition requiring approval by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students may also apply to do an independent study, or History 91r, with a member of the Department; History 91r can be used to fulfill one of the elective course requirements.

    The joint concentration also regularly accepts credit from Study Abroad toward concentration requirements. With the exception of certain Freshman Seminars taught by History or Anthropology faculty (see above), courses taken on Pass/Fail basis may not be counted for concentration credit.

    ADVISING

    Advising in the Department of Anthropology is carried out by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUS), the Assistant Director of Undergraduate Studies (ADUS), faculty, senior graduate students, and the Undergraduate Program Coordinator. The DUS has overall responsibility for the academic progress of undergraduates and, along with the ADUS, is available by appointment for advice on academic and administrative matters. The Undergraduate Program Coordinator also provides information on departmental and College requirements and on administrative matters, particularly to Social Anthropology students. Starting in the junior year and depending on their interests, undergraduates often begin to work more closely with individual faculty members, senior graduate students (especially in Social Anthropology), and members of the staff of the Peabody Museum (especially in Archaeology) within the tutorial system. Choice of a faculty adviser depends largely upon the academic and research interests of the student.

    For up-to-date information on advising in Anthropology, please see the Advising Programs Office website.

    RESOURCES

    Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology
    Founded in 1866, the Peabody Museum is among the oldest archaeological and ethnographic museums in the world with one of the finest collections of human cultural history found anywhere.

    Alfred P. Tozzer Memorial Library
    Founded in 1866, Tozzer Library is the oldest library in the United States devoted to Anthropology and contains more than 250,000 volumes, with a special emphasis on materials relating to the indigenous peoples of the Americas.

    Archaeological Research Labs
    The Mesoamerican Lab focuses on Mesoamerican archaeology, ethnology, epigraphy, and iconography; the Zooarchaeology Lab focuses on the research and analysis of animal remains form archaeological sites; the Joint Use Lab provides facilities and equipment for materials analysis in Archaeology and related disciplines.

    Additional Resources
    Anthropology’s tradition of cross-cultural understanding and multidisciplinary approach to the study of the human condition has fostered strong links to many other disciplines and research centers across Harvard University. Social Anthropologists can be found in the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, the Asia Center, the Harvard-Yenching Institute, the Fairbank Center for East Asian Research, the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, the South Asia Institute, the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, and the Faculties of Medicine, Public Health, and Education, as well as in other departments of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. There are Archaeologists in the departments of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, Classics, and History of Art and Architecture, as well as a Standing Committee on Archaeology that includes individuals from across FAS who are practicing archaeologists or for whom use of the results of archaeological study are integral to their teaching and research. From time to time distinguished visiting scholars hold teaching appointments in the department. Harvard students have access to an exceptionally large number of professional anthropologists.

    FIELDWORK

    Fieldwork may be taken for credit through an approved university. Institute of Field Research archaeological field schools are pre-approved by the Department of Anthropology. Although concentrators will register directly with the other university, they must first obtain permission from the Department of Anthropology at Harvard and apply for credit through the Office of International Education. Upon completion of this work and receipt of the official transcript, the department will make a recommendation to the Office of International Education regarding the amount of concentration credit to be granted toward the AB degree.

    HOW TO FIND OUT MORE

    The department's website address is www.anthropology.fas.harvard.edu. The undergraduate office is Room 103B, Tozzer Anthropology Building, 21 Divinity Avenue (617-495-3814). Undergraduate Program Coordinator may be reached at anthrouc@fas.harvard.edu. The Director for Undergraduate Studies is Dr. Rowan K. Flad, Peabody Museum 57G, 11 Divinity Avenue (617-495-1966) rflad@fas.harvard.edu. The Assistant Director of Undergraduate Studies is Dr. Zoe Eddy, Tozzer Anthropology Building, Room 207, 21 Divinity Avenue (zeddy@fas.harvard.edu).

    ENROLLMENT STATISTICS
    Number of Concentrators as of December

    Concentrators 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
    Anthropology 126 113 93 69 67 58 59 53 43 45
    Anthropology + another field 6 7 6 10 7 7 7 7 8 11
    Another field + Anthropology 6 2 6 4 5 5 8 7 7 8








     

    Applied Mathematics

    Professor Steven Gortler, Co-Director of Undergraduate Studies

    Professor Jeremy Bloxham , Co-Director of Undergraduate Studies (Fall)

    Dr. Margo Levine, Associate Director of Undergraduate Studies

    Dr. Sarah Iams, Assistant Director of Undergraduate Studies

    Mathematical modeling is ubiquitous throughout the physical, biological, social, engineering, and management sciences. Mathematical scientists who identify themselves primarily as applied mathematicians develop, implement, and study mathematical, statistical, and computational techniques broadly applicable in various fields. In addition, they bring mathematical modeling skills to bear on particular scientific problems, using judicious approximations to obtain insights and predictions when the underlying phenomena are thought to be relatively simple and well understood, or creating conceptual frameworks for quantitative reasoning and measurement when the underlying phenomena are complicated and less well understood. In their methodological role, they may function temporarily as mathematicians, statisticians, or computer scientists; in their phenomenological role, they may function temporarily as physicists, chemists, biologists, economists, engineers, and the like. In both roles, they must possess relevant knowledge, technical mastery, and educated taste; clearly this necessitates specialization. Avowed practitioners of mathematically-oriented segments of other disciplines equally may function temporarily as applied mathematicians.

    The range of activities carried on under the aegis of the principal professional organization in the field, the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM), can serve as an operational definition of the scope of the discipline. Various SIAM publications are readily accessible to Harvard students and student memberships are available. Ideally, over time, an applied mathematician demonstrates substantive involvement with both the mathematical and scientific aspects of their dual roles. In the long run, their contributions must be evaluated based on both methodological and phenomenological impact. Inside academia, their activities are usually carried out in collaboration with students or colleagues; outside academia, they often serve as part of a multidisciplinary team tackling complex problems under time and resource constraints. In either context, a premium is placed on having an outstanding ability to communicate with fellow technical professionals. Applied mathematics is inherently interdisciplinary, in motivation and in operation. This vision informs the design of the concentration.

    The Applied Mathematics concentration consists of a broad undergraduate education in the mathematical sciences, especially in those subjects that have proved vital to an understanding of problems arising in other disciplines, and in some specific area where mathematical methods have been substantively applied. For concentrators, a core learning objective is building and demonstrating foundational knowledge in computation, probability, discrete, and continuous mathematics through the successful completion of the foundation and breadth courses. In addition, through their coursework, concentrators should gain facility and comfort in using approximation to simplify problems and gain insight. They should learn to communicate effectively with fellow technical professionals, and should be prepared, by their senior year, to tackle mathematical modeling problems in their area of application, at the level of a senior thesis. Additionally, students can expect to be able to attain employment or, with appropriate planning, gain admission to graduate study in applied mathematics.

    The concentration requirements are flexible, but structured and demanding. Individual programs should be arranged in consultation with an advisor, and are approved by the advisor and by the Co-Director, Associate Director, or Assistant Director of Undergraduate Studies. The concentration is overseen by an interdepartmental Committee on Undergraduate Studies in Applied Mathematics, and administered by the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).

    Students select the concentration because they like mathematics, and especially the use of mathematics to solve real-world problems. Some want a deeper involvement with an area of application than may be provided within a mathematics, statistics, or computer science concentration. Others want a more mathematically-oriented approach to an area of application than that normally provided within the corresponding concentration; mathematical economics is a prime example. Yet others want a special program not otherwise available, usually involving an area of application in which mathematical modeling is less common. Applied mathematics programs will typically involve a broader range of study within the mathematical sciences and a narrower range of study within the area of application than alternate programs offered by neighboring concentrations. With a little forethought, it is ordinarily straightforward to change the chosen area of application or to transfer between this concentration and neighboring ones until the end of the sophomore year, and often beyond.

    Some concentrators go on to graduate work or to employment in their area of application, or in applied mathematics. Others go on to professional schools in law, medicine, or business. Students interested in entering a PhD program should plan to take more technical electives than the minimum required for concentration, and should plan their program carefully with the Co-Director, Associate Director, or Assistant Director of Undergraduate Studies.

    REQUIREMENTS
    14-15 courses (56-60 credits)

    Prospective concentrators are encouraged to make early contact with concentration representatives. Students wishing to enter the concentration should review the concentration requirements, meet with the Assistant, Associate, or Co-Director of Undergraduate Studies to discuss their proposed program, and then submit a program of study at studyplan.seas.harvard.edu/. Students should be aware that interdisciplinary and interdepartmental programs will usually be more demanding than conventional programs in an established discipline. Prerequisite or corequisite courses not included in the program of study may be needed to provide background or perspective.

    In addition to the courses listed specifically below, more advanced courses may be approved by petition in the context of a particular program of study. A petition must propound in writing a coherent and persuasive argument for the intellectual merit of the proposal in question. In certain areas of application, undergraduates routinely take courses designated as primarily for graduate students. Recommendations or restrictions on course selection may flow from the choice of a particular area of application.

    Total course requirements may be reduced from fifteen to no less than twelve, and the balance of foundation and breadth courses are dependent on placement in Math courses as listed below in item 1a. Such placement is granted based on an appropriate Advanced Placement examination, the Harvard Mathematics Placement Test, or an equivalent college-level course taken elsewhere, provided this bypass is validated by successful completion (honor grades) of more advanced courses. Students seeking placement based on college-level work done elsewhere must submit a petition to the Co-Director, Associate Director, or Assistant Director of Undergraduate Studies, supplemented by suitable supporting materials. Transfer students from other colleges will have their programs considered on a case-by-case basis in response to a petition documenting their previous preparation.

    1. Required courses:
      1. Foundation: Two to five courses (see note 1) in calculus and linear algebra.
        1. Mathematics Ma and Mb or Mathematics 1a
        2. Mathematics 1b
        3. Applied Mathematics 21a, 22b, Mathematics 21a
        4. Applied Mathematics 21b, 22a, Mathematics 21b
      2. Breadth: Seven to five courses (see item 1.1, below) from the following categories. Students must take courses from at least five out of the eight categories listed below. Of those, students must take at least one course in Computation and one course in Probability and Statistics. In addition, students must take a course drawn from at least one “continuous” category (Differential Equations or Analysis) and one drawn from at least one “discrete” category (Algebra, Optimization, or Discrete Mathematics). Students must show evidence of satisfying prerequisites for a course to count towards the concentration.
        1. Computation: First course: Applied Mathematics 111 and/or Computer Science 50. Additional courses: Applied Mathematics 205, 207; Computer Science 51, 61, 181, 182, 205; Statistics 121a, Statistics 121b; MCB 112
        2. Probability and Statistics: First course: either Statistics 110 or Mathematics 154, but not both. Additional courses: Statistics 111, 121, 139; Mathematics 117
        3. Differential Equations: Applied Mathematics 105, 108, 202; Mathematics 110
        4. Analysis: Applied Mathematics 104, 201, 202; Mathematics 112, 113, 114, 115, 118r
        5. Algebra:
          • Linear Algebra: Applied Mathematics 120, Mathematics 121
          • Abstract Algebra: Applied Mathematics 106; Mathematics 122, 123, 124
        6. Optimization: Applied Mathematics 121; Mathematics 116
        7. Discrete Mathematics: Applied Mathematics 107; Mathematics 152, 155r; Computer Science 121, 124, 125
        8. Modeling and Approved Electives: Applied Mathematics 50, 91r, 115; Economics 985; or an approved advanced technical elective from outside of the student’s application area
      3. Application: Five courses from an area of application in which mathematics has been substantively applied, selected to provide a coherent and cumulative introduction to mathematically-oriented aspects of the field.
      4. Notes:
        1. The number of required courses depends on the starting Math course (see Requirements above).
          1. Students starting in Math Ma or 1a: 15 courses
            1. Math Ma (5 Foundation, 5 Breadth, 5 Application)
            2. Math 1a (4 Foundation, 6 Breadth, 5 Application)
          2. Students starting in Math 1b or higher: 14 courses
            1. Math 1b (3 Foundation, 6 Breadth, 5 Application)
            2. Math 21a or higher (2 Foundation, 7 Breadth, 5 Application)
            3. Note: Students starting in AM 21a, 22b, or Math 21a may take Mathematics 101 in their first or sophomore year as a third Foundation course; these students are then required to take only six courses in the Breadth category. Students may count AM 50 only if it is taken before AM115.
          3. Students may take Math 22ab, 23ab, 23ac, 25ab, 55ab in place of AM 21ab, AM 22ab, Math 21ab.  In terms of preparing for future AM coursework, these courses are appropriate for students who have previously taken multivariable calculus and linear algebra at the level of AM 21ab, AM 22ab, Math 21ab.
        2. Honors: Recommendations for honors are based on the grade point average of the final plan of study, the rigor of the overall record, and the satisfaction of the Honors requirement. The Honors requirement is automatically satisfied with a B- or higher grade in Applied Mathematics 115 and satisfactory grades in the 115 prerequisites. The second option is a modeling project, undertaken in AM 91r, in which a mathematical analysis of a problem is undertaken. Papers describing the project must be turned in to the concentration for evaluation by the end of the semester in which the AM 91r is completed.
        3. Recommendations for High or Highest Honors depend on the grade average in the courses included in the final plan of study, the rigor of the overall record, and the completion and evaluation of a senior thesis.
    2. Thesis: Optional (see item 1.2, 1.3).
    3. General Examination: None.
    4. Other information:
      1. Pass/Fail: All courses counted for concentration credit must be letter-graded.
      2. Program of Study: Students entering the concentration must file an Applied Mathematics program of study. The program must be reviewed with the student’s adviser and updated as necessary each term thereafter before the deadline. Programs of study are initially approved by the adviser, and are subsequently approved by the Co-Director, Associate Director, or Assistant Director of Undergraduate Studies.
      3. Joint Concentration: Applied Mathematics may not be combined with any other field of concentration because of its intrinsically interdisciplinary nature; study of an area of application is already an essential part of the program.

    ADVISING

    The Directors, Professor Steven Gortler, sjg@seas.harvard.edu, (617) 496-3751; Professor Jeremy Bloxham, jeremy_bloxham@harvard.edu, (617) 496-0289 (fall term only); Dr. Margo Levine, mlevine@seas.harvard.edu, (617) 496-8129; and Dr. Sarah Iams, siams@seas.harvard.edu, (617) 495-5935—serve as interim advisers to all students entering the concentration. Subsequently, an adviser is assigned. Special arrangements are made for students whose area of application is mathematical economics, in cooperation with the Economics Department. If an adviser becomes unavailable, the student is reassigned to a new adviser. Students may seek further advice from the Co-Directors, Associate Director, or Assistant Director of Undergraduate Studies at any time.

    For up-to-date information on advising in Applied Mathematics, please see the Advising Programs Office website.

     

    ENROLLMENT STATISTICS
    Number of Concentrators as of December

    Concentrators 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
    Applied Mathematics* 101 159 177 196 226 244 275 285 279 305

     


     

    *Applied Mathematics does not participate in joint concentrations.

     

    Art, Film, and Visual Studies

    Professor Matt Saunders, Director of Undergraduate Studies

    The concentration in Art, Film, and Visual Studies (AFVS) cultivates skills in both the practice and the critical study of the visual arts. Its components include photography, filmmaking, animation, video art, painting, drawing, printmaking and sculpture, as well as film and visual studies, critical theory, and the study of the built environment. The department has a strong commitment to fostering dialogue among makers, critics, and theorists. The modes of teaching combine the intensity of conservatory programs with the broad intellectual aims of a liberal arts college.

    Within AFVS, there are three different areas of focus—1) studio arts, 2) film/video making, and 3) film and visual studies—and each have slightly different requirements. In studio arts and film/video, concentrators work toward comprehensive accomplishment in a chosen area of artistic production while simultaneously exploring a variety of other practices. In film and visual studies, concentrators pursue interdisciplinary approaches to the theory and history of images, space, art, and media. In all areas, AFVS concentrators work closely with faculty, predominantly in studios and small seminars, to gain understanding through both study and practice.

    There is a brief application process to concentrate in Art, Film, and Visual Studies.  Sophomores wishing to concentrate in AFVS must have taken at least one AFVS course or be in the process of taking one in their specific area of focus or track, at the time of their application submission, sophomore fall. For example, those students interested in film/videomaking and production must have taken or be in an AFVS film/videomaking and production course; similarly, students interested in studio arts must have taken or be in an AFVS studio arts course, and students interested in the film and visual studies area must have taken or be in a film and visual studies course. Typically, the application is due two weeks prior to the College’s concentration declaration in the fall term. For students who wish to switch in to AFVS from other concentrations after the fall term, the application process is rolling. All students must have a previous academic record of at least a B (3.0) average in any VES/AFVS coursework to date.

    Upon graduation, concentrators in AFVS enter a wide variety of fields. Some pursue careers as artists or filmmakers while others go into media and communications. Among the graduate schools to which AFVS concentrators are admitted are schools of architecture, animation, art, film, and photography, as well graduate schools of arts and sciences, medicine, and business.

    REQUIREMENTS
    12 courses (48 credits)

    Required courses (vary by track):

    STUDIO ARTS AND FILM/VIDEO

    1. Introductory Studios/Film or Video Production Courses: At least two courses should be completed by the end of the sophomore year related to the student's area of focus. Introductory courses are typically numbered with two digits.
    2. Intermediate Studios/Film or Video Production Courses: At least two courses should be completed by the end of the junior year related to the student's area of focus. Intermediate courses are typically numbered with three digits.
      Note: A film/video thesis will be allowed only if it represents the 5th and 6th courses in the medium of the thesis.
    3. Historical and Theoretical Courses: At least two courses are required. These are seminar and lecture courses offered in AFVS that explore the history and theory of the moving image, contemporary art, the built environment, and critical studies. Appropriate courses offered in other departments can count toward the history and theory requirements with prior AFVS department approval.
    4. AFVS 97: Sophomore Tutorial: Required of all AFVS concentrators during their first full term in the concentration, ordinarily sophomore spring
    5. Electives within the concentration: Five additional courses in AFVS, two of which may be AFVS 99, the senior thesis or senior project tutorial. AFVS 99 is considered an elective and is not a required course.

    FILM and VISUAL STUDIES

    1. Introductory Courses: Two courses comprising AFVS70, The Art of Film and one other double-digit seminar or lecture course in film and visual studies offered within the department. AFVS 100: Critical Studies—the Artist and AFVS  181: Film Theory, Visual Thinking and Media may also be counted toward the second introductory course.
    2. AFVS 97: Sophomore Tutorial: Required of all AFVS concentrators during their first full term in the concentration, ordinarily sophomore spring
    3. AFVS 98R: Junior Tutorial: Research-based writing workshop
    4. Advanced Film and Visual Studies Seminars: At least three advanced, three-digit seminars in film and visual studies.
    5. Electives: Three courses directly related to film and visual studies, including an AFVS film production or studio course of the student’s choosing. Offerings under this heading will include both film and visual studies classes offered in AFVS by regular and visiting faculty as well as pertinent film studies classes offered in departments outside of AFVS with prior departmental approval.
    6. Senior Thesis or Senior Project: Students who write a thesis or senior project essay will enroll in AFVS 99, which constitutes two courses. Students are strongly encouraged to write a thesis or senior project essay, though it is not required. Students who choose not to write a thesis will instead take two additional advanced film and visual studies courses (these choices are subject to the approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies). AFVS 99 is considered an elective and is not a required course.
    7. *Note: Students should consult with the Director of Undergraduate Studies or the Manager of Academic Programs to discuss which courses in other departments may count toward AFVS film and visual studies requirements.

    INFORMATION FOR ALL TRACKS

    1. Tutorials and Supervised Study:
      1. AFVS 97: Sophomore Tutorial: Required of all AFVS concentrators during their first full term in the concentration, ordinarily sophomore spring
      2. AFVS 99: Tutorial-Senior Year. Senior Projects/Theses. AFVS 99 is presumed to be a year-long 8-credit course but may be divided if necessary. A thesis or senior project is not required. (For further information please see item 3, below).
      3. AFVS 91R: Special Projects: In very rare instances, open to advanced students who wish to carry out a special project under supervision. Professional specialization is not the aim of this course. It is intended for specially qualified students who wish to extend work begun in a regular department course. Students wishing to enroll in AFVS 91r must find a member of the faculty to advise the project and submit an application to the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
        Note: All tutorials and special projects courses in AFVS are letter-graded only. Application forms for all AFVS tutorials are available in the department office or from the
        department's website.
      4. Thesis: Qualified students may only undertake a thesis upon approval by the AFVS Honors Board. A filmmaking thesis must represent the third year of work in film production. A thesis in video must represent the third year of work in film and/or video production. All theses should be preceded by a related critical or historical course. Students who want to do a thesis should plan their sophomore and junior year courses accordingly. No concentrator in Art, Film, and Visual Studies is required to do a thesis or senior project to be recommended for honors.
        It is also possible to enroll in an AFVS  99 tutorial without doing a thesis. Like a thesis, these senior projects are undertaken with a tutorial adviser but do not undergo some of the rigors associated with the thesis (including thesis reviews, reader evaluations, and the requirement of a finished body of work). A final body of work may or may not result from an AFVS 99 senior project. For further information on the differences between an AFVS 99 tutorial with thesis and an AFVS 99 tutorial without thesis, please consult with the Director of Undergraduate Studies or the
        department’s website.
    2. General Examination: None.
    3. Other Information:
      1. Related courses for concentration credit: Ordinarily, no more than two courses taken outside Art, Film, and Visual Studies or History of Art and Architecture may be so counted. It is strongly recommended that studio concentrators with little background in the history of art take introductory courses in history of art and architecture as soon as possible.
        Concentrators in all areas of the department who wish to receive concentration credit for any non-AFVS course (in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, at another of Harvard’s graduate schools, at MIT, in the Harvard Summer School, or while studying out of residence) must submit a course requirement substitution form, available on
        the AFVS website, even if the course is cross-listed. If the course is not cross-listed, a syllabus must accompany the petition. Syllabi are not required to accompany cross-listed course petitions.
        Courses in history of art and architecture, theater design, and some courses in the field of cultural studies may be counted for concentration credit, subject to the approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies when the Plan of Study is filed.
      2. Students who are interested in pursuing a joint concentration in Art, Film, and Visual Studies and another concentration must meet with the Director of Undergraduate Studies to discuss this potential course of study.
      3. Pass/Fail: Courses counting for concentration credit may not be taken Pass/Fail or SAT/UNS, except that one Freshman Seminar may be counted for elective concentration credit if taught by a department faculty member and consistent with AFVS department offerings, and the student has received a positive evaluation.
      4. Work done out of residence: A student wishing to count work done out of residence toward concentration requirements must have the plan for such work approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies and the Office of International Education prior to undertaking it. No credit will be given for work done out of residence until this work, when completed, is evaluated by the faculty of the department. Ordinarily not more than three courses taken out of residence will be counted for concentration credit. For information on programs recommended by the faculty of the department, please visit the Office of International Education website.
      5. Honors: Ordinarily, no student whose overall grade point average in the concentration falls below B will be recommended for honors. No concentrator in Art, Film, and Visual Studies is required to do a thesis to be eligible for an honors recommendation from the department.

    ADVISING

    Departmental academic advising is provided by the Director of Undergraduate Studies who meets individually with concentrators to discuss course selection. Information and advice are also available throughout the year in the Carpenter Center from Paula Soares, Manager of Academic Programs, who is available on a walk-in basis during most regular office hours. Each new concentrator is assigned a faculty adviser and is required to meet with the adviser at least once at the start of each term to review their plan of study. Students are reminded that they are each ultimately responsible for the fulfillment of concentration requirements, and should check regularly on the current status of their progress.

    For up-to-date information on advising in Art, Film, and Visual Studies, please see the Advising Programs Office website.

    RESOURCES

    Aside from providing the space in which the Department of Art, Film, and Visual Studies holds many of its classes, the Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts, designed by world-renowned architect Le Corbusier, is an important landmark in the recent history of architecture and is the setting in which Harvard evidences its concern for contemporary expression in the visual arts. During the academic year exhibitions, performances, events, film screenings, and lectures are offered. In addition, the Harvard Film Archive, housed in the Carpenter Center, mounts an ongoing program of film screenings.

    The Carpenter Center contains studio classrooms for the practice of the studio arts. The department also holds classes in Sever Hall, where most of the film, video, and animation studio courses are conducted. Studios at 6–8 Linden Street are used by practicing artists and photographers, including members of the faculty and senior concentrators doing thesis work, when applicable.

    Art, Film, and Visual Studies concentrators benefit from the unusually rich University collections of Harvard’s museums: The Harvard Art Museum, The Museum of Natural History, and Semitic, Museum containing Western, Asian, and ethnographic art. Harvard’s library holdings in art and archaeology include more than 250,000 books and more than 1,500,000 photographs and slides.

    The Museum of Fine Arts is one of Boston’s great cultural resources. Other resources are the ICA Boston, the MIT List Visual Arts Center, and the commercial and non-profit galleries of the greater Boston area.

    HOW TO FIND OUT MORE

    Further information about the concentration may be obtained from the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor  Matt Saunders (msaunders@fas.harvard.edu) or the Manager of Academic Programs, Paula Soares (soares@fas.harvard.edu, 617-496-4469). The department has an extensive website, providing a range of information on the faculty, courses, the Carpenter Center lecture series as well as exhibition schedule.

     

    ENROLLMENT STATISTICS
    Number of Concentrators as of December

    Concentrators 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
    Visual and Environmental Studies 80 83 69 65 59 52 37 54 56 59
    Visual and Environmental Studies + another field 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 8 5
    Another field + Visual and Environmental Studies 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 4 7

    Astrophysics

    Professor Karin Öberg, Director of Undergraduate Studies

    The concentration in Astrophysics builds the foundation from which students may consider some of the deepest questions of the physical universe. What was the state and composition of the Universe at the moment of the Big Bang? What is the nature of the force that currently dominates the expansion of the Universe? How do space and time behave in the vicinity of the black hole? How do galaxies form, and how do stars and planets form within those galaxies? Are there habitable worlds other than our own?

    The science of astrophysics involves the study of matter and radiation in the universe as understood through the laws of physics. Astronomical phenomena exhibit an extreme range of physical conditions, from superfluid neutrons in neutron stars, high-temperature nuclear reactions in supernovae, and strong gravitational fields near black holes, to the unique state of the universe during its earliest phases. Theoretical attempts to describe these and more familiar phenomena (such as stars and galaxies) have achieved a useful understanding in many cases. However, our overall knowledge of the universe is still woefully incomplete, and our contemporary physical knowledge is often stretched to its limits in attempting to understand physical conditions that cannot be reproduced in terrestrial laboratories.

    The concentration in Astrophysics introduces students to a broad range of phenomena through a program of both observational and theoretical courses. This program builds from a foundation of modern physics to a general account of the known contents of the universe. Astronomy 16 and 17 provide a complete introductory survey to the major fields of astrophysics. The research tutorial, Astronomy 98, places students in close contact with the wide range of research activities at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Undergraduates are strongly encouraged to pursue research projects (conducted under the mentorship of members of the faculty), which culminate in their junior papers and optional senior theses. Since the emphasis of astrophysics is on the explanation of phenomena in the universe in terms of physical theory, the initial stages of a concentration in Astrophysics closely resemble those of the Physics concentration, and the courses offered by the Department of Astronomy are readily accessible to any student with a good physics background. Our concentration offers avenues similar to Physics for future employment and research opportunities.

    Astrophysics offers joint concentrations with other departments. In general, such concentrations involve meeting requirements for honors candidates in both fields. Joint concentrations combining Astrophysics with either Physics or with Earth and Planetary Sciences are particularly encouraged, although various other combinations are certainly possible. Students interested in joint concentrations are encouraged to contact the Director of Undergraduate studies, Professor Karin Öberg, at 617-496-9062 or koberg@cfa.harvard.edu.

    Students interested in completing a master’s degree in astrophysics during their fourth year can find more detailed information in our section of the Advanced Standing at Harvard College booklet, and should contact the Astronomy department early in their degree program.

    REQUIREMENTS
    12 courses (48 credits)

    1. Required courses:
      1. Astronomy 16 and 17 (2 courses; see 7.a. below).
      2. Physics 15a, 15b, and 15c (3 courses; see 7.b. below).
      3. Mathematics 21a and 21b, or Mathematics 23a and 23b, or Mathematics 25a and 25b, or Applied Mathematics 21a and 21b (2 courses; see 7.c. below).
      4. Astronomy 98: Research Tutorial, generally taken in the spring semester of the junior year (1 course).
      5. Two additional courses in astronomy (2 courses; see 7.d. below).
      6. Two additional courses in astronomy or related fields to complete the requirement of 12 courses (2 courses; see 7.e. below).
    2. Tutorial: Required, see 1.d. above.
    3. Honors Eligibility: Students who wish to be considered for honors must satisfy requirements 1.e. and 1.f. by completing Astronomy 99 and/or courses at the 100 level or above. None of the courses satisfying 1.e. or 1.f. may be taken Pass/Fail. Courses that meet this requirement include:
      1. Astronomy 99, a year-long 8-credit course leading to the senior thesis. The Department of Astronomy is located within the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, one of the world’s largest astrophysical research institutes. The Center for Astrophysics offers significant undergraduate research opportunities, which students are encouraged to pursue through the senior thesis.
      2. Any 100-level or 200-level course in astronomy.
      3. Physics 143a, 143b, 151, 153, or 181.
      4. Earth and Planetary Sciences 100, 121, 132, or 150.
      5. Applied Mathematics 104, 105, 111, or 115.
    4. Thesis: Optional. See item 3 above.
    5. Joint concentrations: Joint concentrations are permitted to enable students to pursue study at the interface of Astrophysics and another field such as Physics or Earth and Planetary Sciences. Students must meet with the Director of Undergraduate Studies to develop the plan of study.
    6. General Examination: None.
    7. Other information:
      1. Astronomy 16 and 17: Together these two courses provide a complete introductory survey of astrophysics using single-variable calculus and freshman mechanics. These courses are not sequential and thus may be taken in either order.
      2. Physics: Physical Sciences 12a and 12b may be substituted for Physics 15a and 15b provided students follow with Physics 15c. Qualified students may replace Physics 15a with Physics 16, to be followed by Physics 15b and 15c.
      3. Math: Math Ma, Mb, 1a, and 1b normally do not count toward concentration credit.
      4. Students may count one course selected from the following list for concentration credit, provided the course is completed prior to enrolling in other courses offered by the Department of Astronomy.
        1. Astronomy 2
        2. Astronomy 5
        3. a freshman seminar in Astronomy, or
        4. a course offered in the Science of the Physical Universe category of the Program in General Education that focuses on astronomy.
      5. Related fields: Includes all departmental courses offered in physics, earth and planetary sciences, mathematics, and applied mathematics that count towards the respective concentration requirements. Appropriate courses in applied physics, computer science, chemistry, engineering sciences, mathematics, and statistics may be counted for concentration credit with permission from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
      6. Graduate Study: Students considering graduate study should contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies to prepare a study plan to meet this goal.
      7. Pass/Fail: At most one of the courses counted for concentration credit may be taken Pass/Fail.

    ADVISING

    Upon joining the concentration, students are assigned a faculty adviser; students continue with the same adviser throughout their three years, unless there is a particular reason for making a change. Students meet with their adviser at least once per term and at other times as needed.

    For up-to-date information on advising in Astrophysics, please see the Advising Programs Office website.

    RESOURCES

    The Department of Astronomy is located within the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, which also contains the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and Harvard College Observatory, at 60 Garden Street and 160 Concord Avenue, Cambridge. The Center for Astrophysics has a large staff of scientists and is among the largest institutions devoted to astronomy and astrophysics in the world. A very broad range of astrophysical research is conducted by the many scientists at the Center, in its divisions of Atomic and Molecular Physics; High-Energy Astrophysics; Optical and Infrared Astronomy; Radio and Geoastronomy; Theoretical Astrophysics; and Solar, Stellar, and Planetary Sciences. Scientists in these divisions encourage students to participate in their research. Full-time summer and part-time academic year employment is often available for Harvard undergraduates at the Center; please contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies for more information.

    Through the Center for Astrophysics students may make use of a wide range of observational, experimental, and theoretical facilities. These include two 6.5-meter Magellan Telescopes in Chile; the Multiple-Mirror Telescope and the 1.5-m and 1.2-m reflecting telescopes of the Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins, Arizona; and the Submillimeter Array on Mauna Kea in Hawaii. In addition, students may participate in the analysis of data from a number of national and international observatories, including X-ray data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory, ultraviolet and optical data from the Hubble Space Telescope, solar data from SOHO, radio data from the Very Large Array and the VLBI network, and infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope.

    HOW TO FIND OUT MORE

    The Director of Undergraduate Studies for the concentration is Professor Karin Öberg. Her Observatory office is 60 Garden Street, MS-16, Center for Astrophysics, Perkins 346  (617-496-9062); her email address is koberg@cfa.harvard.edu. A map showing the location of the Observatory complex can be found at the Center for Astrophysics website. The Astronomy department office is located at the same address in room P-243 (617-495-3753). Online information about the Astronomy department is available at the department's website. If you are interested in study abroad, please contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

    ENROLLMENT STATISTICS
    Number of Concentrators as of December

    Concentrators 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
    Astronomy 3 9 8 6 7 10 9 6 2 5
    Astronomy + another field 1 8 7 12 10 16 12 17 17 11
    Another field + Astronomy 5 7 10 8 6 6 7 5 5 3








     

    Biomedical Engineering

    Professor Conor Walsh, Director of Undergraduate Studies

    Biomedical Engineering lies at the intersection of the physical and life sciences, incorporating principles from physics and chemistry to understand the operation of living systems. As in other engineering fields, the approach is highly quantitative: mathematical analysis and modeling are used to capture the function of systems from subcellular to organism scales. An education in Biomedical Engineering, and engineering more broadly, enables students to translate abstract hypothesis and scientific knowledge into working systems (e.g., prosthetic devices, imaging systems, and biopharmaceuticals). This enables one to both test the understanding of basic principles and to further this knowledge, and it places this understanding in the broader context of societal needs.

    In recognition of the pivotal importance of the life sciences and the technologies they inspire to our society, Harvard is committed to broadly educating engineers who will become leaders in the developing field of Biomedical Engineering. The objectives of this concentration include providing students a solid foundation in engineering, particularly as applied to the life sciences, within the setting of a liberal arts education. The concentration is flexibly structured for a diversity of educational and professional objectives. It enables the acquisition of a broad range of skills and attitudes drawn from the humanities, social sciences and sciences, in addition to engineering, which enhance engineering knowledge and which will contribute to future leadership and technical success.

    The overarching intellectual goal of biomedical engineering is to apply quantitative engineering analysis to understand the operation of living systems and design novel systems to satisfy unmet needs in medicine and industry. Specific objectives for students undertaking the A.B. in Biomedical Engineering are:

    • Utilize mathematical analysis and modeling to capture the function of systems from subcellular to organism scales.
    • Understand and apply the fundamental engineering disciplines (thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, kinetics); sciences (physics, biology, chemistry); and mathematics (statistics, differential equations) to solve biomedical problems.
    • Translate scientific knowledge into working systems (e.g., prosthetic devices, imaging systems, and biopharmaceuticals).
    • Gain depth of knowledge in chemical, biological, materials, and engineering science aspects of bioengineering.

    The AB degree consists of 14 courses (56 credits). This degree prepares students for the practice of Biomedical Engineering and for graduate study in engineering and medicine, and it is an excellent preparation for careers in other professions (business, law, etc.) as it provides an ideal framework for a well-rounded technical and scientific education. The curriculum is highly structured, with advanced courses building on the knowledge acquired in math, science, and introductory engineering science courses. Concentrators are encouraged to complete the common prerequisite course sequence in their first two years at Harvard. This includes Math (21a and 21b, 22a and 22b, 23a and 23b, or Applied Mathematics 21a and 21b, or 22a and 22b), Life Sciences and Chemistry (Life Sciences 1a and 1b), Physics (Applied Physics 50a and 50b; Physics 15a and 15b or 16 and 15b, or Physical Sciences 2 and 3 or 12a and 12b), and Engineering Sciences 53. Students are cautioned that it is more important to derive a solid understanding of these basic subjects than to complete them quickly without thorough knowledge; this material is extensively used in many subsequent courses. The Sophomore Forum provides an opportunity for students to become familiar with the range of engineering disciplines, research opportunities within the School, and to make industrial contacts in an informal setting.

    The technologies that engineers create are changing at an amazing rate, but the fundamental tools of engineering that enable these advances remain more constant. The Biomedical Engineering curriculum emphasizes a solid background in the chemical and biological aspects of the Biomedical Engineering field, with ample opportunity to learn about state-of-the-art technologies. In particular, students will take courses in systems modeling (ES 53 and BE 110) to better understand and mathematically model non-linear, complex biological systems; thermodynamics (ES 181, ES 112, or MCB 199) to appreciate the basic driving forces underlying biological and chemical systems; the fundamental processes of heat and mass transport (ES 123) that often control the rates of system changes; and molecular to tissue level engineering of biological systems (BE 121, 125 or ES 221). Through this coursework students also gain experience in the engineering design process, the engineering activity that requires creative synthesis as well as analysis.

    REQUIREMENTS
    14 courses (56 credits)

    1. Required courses:
      1. Mathematics: Applied Mathematics 21a and 21b; Applied Mathematics 22a and 22b; Mathematics 21a and 21b; Mathematics 22a and 22b; or Mathematics 23a and 23b.
      2. Physics: Applied Physics 50a and 50b; Physical Sciences 2 and 3 or 12a and 12b; or Physics 15a and 15b, or 16 and 15b.
      3. Statistics: Applied Math 101 or Statistics 111.
      4. Organic Chemistry: Chemistry 17 or 20.
      5. Cell Biology and Genetics: Life and Physical Sciences A or Life Sciences 1a, and Life Sciences 1b. Students who take Life and Physical Sciences A should consult with the Director of Undergraduate studies to get advice on advanced class selection.
      6. Engineering Sciences (five courses): ES 53; BE 110; ES 123; one of the following: ES 181, ES 112, or MCB 199; one of the following: BE 121, BE 125, BE 160, BE 191, or ES 227.
      7. Approved Elective (one course): BE 121, BE 125, BE 128, BE 129, BE 130, BE 160, BE 191, ES 120, ES 221, ES 227, ES 228, Chem 27, 30 or 160; CS 50; MCB 60, 80 or OEB 53, or 100- or 200-level engineering courses by prior approval. ES 91r cannot count as an elective.
    2. Sophomore Forum: Sophomore year. Non-credit. Spring term.
    3. Thesis: required for recommendations of high honors and highest honors, and for joint concentrators.
    4. General Examination: None.
    5. Other information:
      1. By prior petition and approval, other advanced undergraduate or graduate courses, as well as courses at MIT, can be used to satisfy general requirements and specialization requirements and electives. Petitions will only be considered for courses that possess technical content at a level similar to other upper-level engineering courses at SEAS.
      2. Pass/Fail and Sat/Unsat: All courses for concentration credit must be letter-graded.
      3. Plan of Study: Concentrators are required to file an approved departmental Plan of Study and to keep their plan up to date in subsequent years. Plan of Study forms may be obtained from the Office of Academic Programs (Pierce 110) or from the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) website.
      4. Independent Project: Students are required to have a substantial research experience in order to deepen their understanding of at least one aspect of the Biomedical Engineering field, and to develop hands-on experience in the scientific method and/or technology development. This typically would be fulfilled through a summer project resulting in a significant written report; alternatively, ES 91r or ES 100hf may be used to fulfill this requirement.
      5. Joint Concentrations: Biomedical Engineering participates in joint concentrations. The requirements for joint concentrators are the same as for sole concentrators; in addition, a joint concentrator is required to write an interdisciplinary thesis that combines the two fields. This thesis is required regardless of whether Biomedical Engineering is the primary or allied concentration.
      6. Any exceptions to these policies must be approved via written petition.

    ADVISING

    Students interested in concentrating in Biomedical Engineering should discuss their plans with the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Conor Walsh, walsh@seas.harvard.edu, (617) 496-4269; or the Assistant Director of Undergraduate Studies, Dr. Linsey Moyer, lmoyer@seas.harvard.edu, (617) 496-2840; or the Undergraduate Academic Programs Manager, Kathy Lovell, klovell@seas.harvard.edu, (617) 496-1524.

    Each undergraduate who elects to concentrate in Biomedical Engineering is assigned a faculty adviser. If students do not request a change in adviser, they have the same adviser until they graduate. Each student is reassigned to another faculty member while the student's original faculty adviser is on leave. It is expected that students will discuss their Plans of Study and progress with their Director or Assistant Director of Undergraduate Studies at the beginning of each term. Students may also seek advice from their faculty adviser, the Director or Assistant Director of Undergraduate Studies, or the Undergraduate Academic Programs Manager at any time.

    HOW TO FIND OUT MORE

    Further information is available from the Undergraduate Academic Programs Manager in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences Office of Academic Programs, Pierce Hall 110 (617-495-2833).

     

    ENROLLMENT STATISTICS
    Number of Concentrators as of December

    Concentrators 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
    Biomedical Engineering 17 41 48 56 52 59 35 33
    Biomedical Engineering + another field   1 1 2 0 2 2 4
    Another field + Biomedical Engineering   1 1 2 2 1 0 3








     

    Chemical and Physical Biology

    Professor Adam Cohen, Co-Head Tutor
    Professor Rachelle Gaudet, Co-Head Tutor

    The Chemical and Physical Biology (CPB) concentration provides students with a broad foundation in the physical and life sciences. This concentration is designed for students interested in applying quantitative tools, physical concepts, and chemical principles to the study of biology.

    Remarkable progress in the last four decades has revealed the atomic structure of proteins, enzymes, and genes; the nature of the genetic code; and how genes can be turned on or off in response to the demands of the environment. As our understanding of fundamental biological processes has increased, so has our appreciation that the focus on information transfer through nucleic acids provides an inadequate basis for understanding living systems. The activities of proteins are regulated by post-translational modifications—chemical changes in protein structure—and are affected by small signaling molecules. Dissecting metabolic pathways and reconstructing cellular networks requires supplementing the traditional arsenal of molecular, genetic, biochemical, and cell biological techniques with advances in chemical and physical methods that make it possible to characterize the state of a biological system under a given set of conditions. Chemical and physical biology provides a link between classical approaches to studying biology and the chemical tools and physical methods required to understand dynamic changes in complex biological systems.

    Students who are interested in understanding living systems in detail will require considerable proficiency in mathematics and physics as well as a broad background in both chemistry and biology. In its emphasis on quantitative, physical, and chemical tools, this concentration represents a significant departure from traditional undergraduate programs of study in the biological and life sciences. Our goal is to provide the next generation of life scientists with the background needed to make new advances in the quantitative understanding of living systems. The CPB concentration is intended primarily for students considering careers in research.

    All students are required to participate in a tutorial unless engaged in thesis research. Tutorials for students in both Chemical and Physical Biology and Molecular and Cellular Biology are offered by the Board of Tutors in Biochemical Sciences, which was established in 1926. Tutors hold a PhD and/or an MD degree and meet with their students, singly or in small groups, about twice a month to discuss topics tailored largely to individual interests and needs. Tutorial sessions typically consist of readings selected from the primary literature or relevant texts. Mentoring on career choices, the research experience, and other academic issues is a logical extension of the tutorial. The tutorial is not taken for credit and therefore does not appear on the my.harvard crimson cart or transcript. A handout that describes the history, goals, and format of the tutorial program is available online.

    All students are required to obtain a minimum of one term of laboratory research experience. This requirement may be fulfilled through a project lab course, a term of laboratory research (Chemical and Physical Biology 91), or research for a senior thesis (Chemical and Physical Biology 99A and B).

    A thesis based on laboratory research is required to be eligible for honors in the Chemical and Physical Biology concentration. Students are encouraged to begin thesis research in a laboratory no later than the start of their junior year.

    REQUIREMENTS
    Basic Requirements: 16 courses (64 credits)

    1. Required courses:
      1. Life Sciences (2 courses): Life Sciences 1a (or Life and Physical Sciences A) and Life Sciences 1b, or equivalent.
      2. Biology (2 courses): MCB 60 and one additional course selected from MCB 63, MCB 64, MCB 65, MCB 68, or MCB 80.
      3. Chemistry (2 courses): One course in general or inorganic chemistry (chosen from Physical Sciences 1, 10 or 11; Chemistry 40 or 160; or a suitable equivalent) and one course in physical chemistry (chosen from Chemistry 60, Molecular and Cellular Biology 65 or 199, Chemistry 161, or a suitable equivalent).
      4. Organic Chemistry (2 courses): Chemistry 20 and 30, or Chemistry 17 and 27, or equivalent.
      5. Mathematics (2 courses): Mathematics 19a and 19b, or 21a and 21b, or Applied Mathematics 21a and 21b.
      6. Physics (2 courses): One course in mechanics (chosen from Physics 16 or 15a, Physical Sciences 2 or 12a, or Applied Physics 50a), and one course in electricity and magnetism (chosen from Physics 15b, Physical Sciences 3 or 12b, or Applied Physics 50b). Students who do not take at least one course at the level of Physics 15 or 16 or Physical Science 12 must take a computational course as one of the upper level courses (see item 1g, below) chosen from CS 50 or 109; Applied Math 111, 115 or 126; MCB 111, 112, 131, or 199; or other computational class approved by the Head Tutor.
      7. Three upper-level courses in the natural sciences, engineering, and/or mathematics. Courses that meet this requirement include any 100-level chemistry, molecular and cellular biology, or physics course. Other courses that meet this requirement are posted here.
      8. Students who do not write a thesis based on laboratory research (see item 3 under Requirements for Honors Eligibility) must take one upper level project lab course (such as Life Sciences 100r or Chemistry 100r) or enroll in one term of Chemical and Physical Biology 91.
    2. Tutorial: The tutorial program is an important component of the concentration. It provides a mechanism for students to engage in mentorship relationships with the MCB faculty and members of the Board of Tutors in Biochemical Sciences. The goals are to (1) provide opportunities for discussions about science and its role in the larger community, (2) provide students with the foundation to apply their education and the scientific method to life outside of the classroom and Harvard and (3) advise and inform students on curricular and pre-professional choices. The tutorial is a non-credit program that spans the whole length of time the student is part of the concentration. A handout that describes the history, goals, and format of the tutorial program is available online.

    Requirements for Honors Eligibility: 16 courses (64 credits)

    1. Required Courses: Same as Basic Requirements.
    2. Tutorial: Same as Basic Requirements.
    3. Thesis: A thesis based on independent laboratory research is required for honors eligibility. Students should therefore enroll in two terms of Chemical and Physical Biology 99, one of which counts towards the upper-level course requirement (see item 1g, above).

    ADVISING

    Professors Adam Cohen and Rachelle Gaudet and Dr. Dominic Mao are available to concentrators and pre-concentrators to provide guidance on course selection, laboratory research, and the fulfillment of concentration requirements.

    RESOURCES

    A tutorial reference library is housed in the CPB Undergraduate Office at 7 Divinity Avenue (95 Sherman Fairchild building), which contains books and hard copies of past senior theses (thesis titles from 2011-present can be viewed here). Four rooms in the upper level of the undergraduate office are used by concentrators for tutorial meetings and as study spaces.

    HOW TO FIND OUT MORE

    The Co-Head Tutors for the Chemical and Physical Biology concentration are Professors Adam Cohen and Rachelle Gaudet, and the Concentration Adviser is Dr. Dominic Mao (dominicmao@fas.harvard.edu or 617-495-4106). Visit https://www.mcb.harvard.edu/undergraduate/chemical-and-physical-biology/ or contact Dr. Dominic Mao (dominicmao@fas.harvard.edu or 617-495-4106) for more information.

    ENROLLMENT STATISTICS
    Number of Concentrators as of December

    Concentrators 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
    Chemical and Physical Biology 33 65 59 57 63 48 42 42 50 45
    Chemical and Physical Biology + another field 22 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1
    Another field + Chemical and Physical Biology 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1

    Chemistry

    Dr. Gregg Tucci, Director of Undergraduate Studies

    Chemistry is the science of the structure, properties, and reactions of matter. It is both a basic science, fundamental to an understanding of the world we live in, and a practical science with an enormous number and variety of important applications. Knowledge of chemistry is fundamental to an understanding of biology and biochemistry and of certain aspects of geology, astronomy, physics, and engineering.

    The most important motivation for a concentration in Chemistry is an intrinsic interest in the subject. Career opportunities in chemistry include the areas of basic research, applied research and development, biotechnology, chemical analysis, manufacturing, and marketing. In addition, a degree in chemistry can be an excellent background for careers in many related fields, including law, medicine, business, environmental science, and other areas of science. Because of the diversity of interests of prospective Chemistry concentrators, the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology has designed a very flexible program of requirements which allows each student to select an area of emphasis. Courses in organic, physical, and inorganic chemistry as well as courses in chemical biology and biochemistry are offered. A few of these courses include required laboratory work, and special laboratory courses are available to advanced students in each area. In addition, concentrators may elect to pursue an individual research project with one of the research groups of the department. Each research group consists of advanced undergraduates, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and a faculty member. In order to introduce students to chemical research and current topics of faculty interest, the department offers a non-credit sophomore tutorial in the spring term, a series of lectures by faculty members on their current research. Concentrators can enroll in the junior tutorial, Chemistry 98r, in which the student joins a research group under the supervision of a faculty member. Often this work is continued throughout the senior year as Chemistry 99. Here the student becomes associated with current research in a particular area either by reading and studying recommended advanced material in that area or by undertaking an individual research project. Such projects often result in publications.

    All of the courses in the department are open to properly prepared undergraduates and most upper-level courses do have some undergraduates. The more advanced courses are designed to be related closely to active areas of research in chemistry. Current research activity is further stressed in the numerous seminars and colloquia in organic, physical, biophysical, and inorganic chemistry as well as in chemical biology, materials, energy and climate. Some seminars are held jointly with other departments at Harvard as well as at MIT. Most research groups have meetings and informal seminars at which topics of interest are discussed.

    In addition to a balanced program of at least eight courses (32 credits) in chemistry, concentrators are able to take courses in physics, biology, biochemistry, engineering, computer science, and mathematics as part of their concentration requirements. Because of the sequence of prerequisites for chemistry courses, the department strongly recommends some work in mathematics as well as chemistry in the first year. Freshmen contemplating this program are urged to consult the Director of Undergraduate Studies of the Chemistry concentration in planning their work for the first year.

    Students graduating with a degree in chemistry will gain skills in a range of areas from reading scientific papers to conducting experiments safety and ethically to learning how to identify and propose solutions to problems that are novel and important. Because research is a foundation for the study of chemistry we believe that all students in the concentration should participate in an authentic research experience by the end of their senior year.

    REQUIREMENTS
    Basic Requirements: 12-14 courses (48-56 credits)

    1. Required courses: Twelve to fourteen courses required, including at least eight courses in chemistry (see item 5a):
      1. General chemistry (two courses): Chosen from Life and Physical Sciences A, Life Sciences 1a, Physical Sciences 1, Physical Sciences 10, and Physical Sciences 11 or satisfactory placement out of the requirement.
      2. Inorganic chemistry (one course): Chemistry 40, or equivalent.
      3. Organic chemistry (two courses): Chemistry 20 and 30, or Chemistry 17 and 27, or equivalent.
      4. Physical chemistry (two courses): Chosen from Chemistry 160 or equivalent; and Chemistry 60, 161, 163, or equivalent.
      5. Advanced laboratory (one course): Chemistry 100r, 135, 145 or 165. Laboratory work performed in Chemistry 91r, 98r, or 99r may not be counted in fulfillment of the advanced laboratory requirement.
      6. Chemistry with a strong biological orientation (one course): Life Sciences 1a, Life and Physical Sciences A or Chemistry 27 or 170, or Molecular and Cellular 60, 63, 64, 65 or equivalent. (Life Sciences 1a and Life and Physical Sciences A may count for both this requirement and 1a above; Chemistry 27 may count for this requirement and 1c above.)
      7. Mathematics (at least one course): Mathematics 21a or equivalent. (e.g., Mathematics 19a, Applied Mathematics 21a, Mathematics 22a, Mathematics 23a, etc.). Mathematics 21b is strongly recommended.
      8. Physics (at least two courses): Physical Sciences 2, 3 or 12a, 12b; Applied Physics 50a, 50b; or the 15a (16), 15b, 15c sequence. Physics 15a and 15b alone do not constitute a complete overview of general physics.
      9. Additional courses as needed to meet the total of twelve in chemistry or in related fields (13 if the student places into Mathematics 1b; 14 if the student must take Mathematics 1a.)
    2. Tutorial:
      1. Sophomore year: Chemistry 91r, optional, for approved students only. A few very well prepared sophomores or first year students who are accepted for laboratory research work may register for Chemistry 91r, graded SAT/UNS only.
      2. Junior year: Chemistry 98r, optional, for approved students only. Graded SAT/UNS only. Each term of Chemistry 98r involves individual reading and research projects under the direction of a member of the staff. Junior concentrators are advised to consult with their advisers and to inquire at the office of the Director of Undergraduate Studies concerning the tutorial program. Students enrolling in Chemistry 98r must register the name of their research mentor at the office of the Director of Undergraduate Studies before registering for Chemistry 98r.
    3. General Examination: None.
    4. Thesis: Not required.
    5. Other information:
      1. Related fields, in the present context, include departmental courses in physics and mathematics, applied physics and applied mathematics, and upper-level departmental courses in biology, biochemistry, and earth and planetary sciences that carry a chemistry prerequisite. Chemistry courses include many biochemistry courses.
      2. Pass/Fail: Two courses counted for concentration credit may be taken Pass/Fail. This does not include SAT/UNS grades given in Chemistry 91r, 98r, or 99r.

    Requirements for Honors Eligibility: 14-16 courses (56-64 credits)

    1. Required courses: 14 courses required, including at least eight courses in chemistry (see item 5a).
      1. Same as Basic Requirements.
      2. Same as Basic Requirements.
      3. Same as Basic Requirements.
      4. Same as Basic Requirements.
      5. Same as Basic Requirements.
      6. Same as Basic Requirements.
      7. Same as Basic Requirements.
      8. Same as Basic Requirements.
      9. Same as Basic Requirements.
      10. Two additional courses in chemistry or biochemistry, or at a suitable advanced level in a related field. Courses that meet this requirement include:
        1. MCB 60, 63. 64, 65.
        2. Other courses significantly related to chemistry may also be accepted on petition to the department.
        3. Physics 15c, 143a, 143b, 151, 153, 181.
        4. Applied Mathematics 104
        5. Mathematics 19b, Mathematics 21b
        6. Life Sciences 1b, Life Sciences 50a, Life Sciences 50b
      11. Total program must include at least four courses in chemistry numbered 100 or higher. Please consult with office of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for a complete list of courses offered by other departments (e.g., MCB 176, MCB 178, EPS 133, ES 135, ES 164) that can be used to satisfy this requirement.
    2. Tutorials:
      1. Sophomore year: Same as Basic Requirements.
      2. Junior year: Same as Basic Requirements.
      3. Senior year: Chemistry 99r, optional, for honors candidates only. Graded SAT/UNS only. Chemistry 99r involves individual reading and research projects under the direction of a faculty member. Students enrolling in Chemistry 99r must register the name of their research mentor at the office of the Director of Undergraduate Studies by the course enrollment deadline.
    3. General Examination: None.
    4. Thesis: Optional. Students enrolled in Chemistry 99r have the option of writing a thesis.
    5. Other information: Same as Basic Requirements.

    ADVISING

    The Director of Undergraduate Studies serves as faculty adviser for all concentrators until they join research groups, usually through the Chemistry 98r tutorial, or otherwise establish a working relationship with another faculty member who agrees to serve as co-faculty adviser. Either the Director of Undergraduate Studies or another faculty adviser may release the advising hold or advise on concentration matters. Students interested in concentrating in chemistry should discuss their plans of study with the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

    For up-to-date information on advising in Chemistry, please see the Advising Programs Office website.

    HOW TO FIND OUT MORE

    Further information is available at the office of the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Chemistry, Dr. Gregg Tucci, Science Center 114 (617-496-4668), tucci@fas.harvard.edu.

    .

    ENROLLMENT STATISTICS
    Number of Concentrators as of December

    Concentrators 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
    Chemistry 90 84 84 78 92 91 91 95 80 65
    Chemistry + another field 3 1 0 1 2 2 4 4 5 8
    Another field + Chemistry 1 0 0 1 0 2 1 1 1 1








     

    Chemistry and Physics

    Professor Howard Georgi, Director of Undergraduate Studies

    Physics and Chemistry are intellectual neighbors, sharing a large and somewhat arbitrary boundary. Scientists in this exciting boundary area study many of the same systems. They use many of the same experimental and theoretical tools. The concentration in Chemistry and Physics is supervised by a committee comprised of members of the Departments of Physics and of Chemistry and Chemical Biology and is administered through the office of the Director of Undergraduate Studies. As the name suggests, the concentration has been established to serve students wishing to explore this boundary who need to develop a strong foundation in both physics and chemistry. Because of the need to cover a wide range of material in considerable depth, only an honors-eligible program is available in this concentration.

    The requirements of the Chemistry and Physics concentration are designed to provide a solid foundation for further study in either or both of these two closely related sciences. Concentrators have gone on to graduate work and careers in chemistry, physics, and other quantitative fields. The concentration is also often chosen by students whose career goals lie in medicine. In addition, the intellectual disciplines involved provide a suitable background for careers in many different professions.

    Because the requirements of the concentration lie between those of Chemistry and of Physics, it is possible that a given set of courses could satisfy the requirements of one of those concentrations as well as those of the concentration in Chemistry and Physics. By the same token, a transfer to or from one of these concentrations, even as late as the junior year, normally causes little difficulty.

    The concentration is structured to assure that all concentrators are introduced to the core subjects of chemistry (organic, inorganic, and physical); of physics (mechanics, electromagnetism, and quantum theory); and of mathematics. Beyond this core, students take additional courses in chemistry, physics, or related sciences, according to their personal interests and objectives.

    Tutorial or individual study and research are optional and may be undertaken within the framework of Physics 90r or 91r, or of Chemistry 91r, 98r, or 99r.

    REQUIREMENTS
    13courses (52 credits)

    1. Required courses:
      1. General Chemistry: Life Sciences 1a and Physical Sciences 1, or Physical Sciences 10 and 11, or satisfactory placement out of the requirement.
      2. Inorganic Chemistry: Chemistry 40 or 158, or equivalent.
      3. Organic Chemistry: Chemistry 20 and 30, or Chemistry 17 and 27. Chemistry 20 and 30 are strongly recommended, but Chemistry 17 and 27 may be a preferred alternative, particularly for students preparing for medical school.
      4. Physical Chemistry or Statistical Mechanics: Chemistry 60 or one of Chemistry 161, Physics 181, or Engineering Sciences 181. One of the statistical mechanics courses is strongly recommended.
      5. Mechanics, Electromagnetism, and Waves: Physics 15a (or Physics 16 or 19), 15b, and 15c. Students may also take Physical Sciences 12a/b or Applied Physics 50a/b in place of Physics 15a/b. These students should contact the Director or Co-Director of Undergraduate Studies, who will work with them to develop a coherent program.
      6. Quantum Mechanics: Physics 143a or Chemistry 160.
      7. Mathematics: Two courses at the level of Mathematics or Applied Mathematics 21a, 21b, or above. While not required, taking one or more additional mathematics courses is strongly recommended. Students should consider especially Applied Mathematics 104 or Mathematics 113; Applied Mathematics 105 or Mathematics 110; Applied Mathematics 111; Applied Mathematics 115; Statistics 110. Students planning to go into research should consider taking a course in computer science and/or numerical analysis.
      8. Additional courses from the list below, to complete the requirement of 13 courses. It is strongly recommended that one course be a laboratory course. In all cases, the student must take at least four physics courses and four chemistry courses.
        1. A course of independent research from the following: Chemistry 91r, 98r, 99r, or Physics 90r.
        2. Any 100- or 200-level chemistry course.
        3. Any 100- or 200-level physics or applied physics course (see 5h).
        4. Any 100- or 200-level math or applied math course.
        5. Any intermediate- or advanced-level course in a science, engineering sciences, or computer science with significant direct application to chemistry or physics. These courses should be approved in advance by the Director or Co-Director of Undergraduate Studies. (No approval is needed for the “related” or “counting as physics” courses listed in the requirements for the Physics concentration.) To fulfill particular needs, a concentrator, with the advisor’s consent, may petition the committee to use other intermediate- or advanced-level science courses for this requirement.
        6. One course from Mathematics 1a and 1b, Life Sciences 1a, and Physical Sciences 1 may count toward the requirement of 13 courses.
    2. Tutorials: Optional. Admission to tutorials requires prior approval by the Director of Undergraduate Studies of the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology.
      1. Junior year: Chemistry 98r.
      2. Senior year: Chemistry 99r.
    3. Thesis: Optional.
    4. General Examination: None.
    5. Other Information:
      1. Satisfactory grades (C- or better) are required in Physics 15a, 15b, and 15c (or higher level substitutions).
      2. Pass/Fail: Two courses counted for concentration may be taken Pass/Fail, but not Physics 15a, 15b, 15c, 16, or 19.
      3. Substitutions: Students can substitute a more advanced course for one or more of the required elementary courses on the same topics, provided they have the written permission of the Director or Co-Director of Undergraduate Studies. However, the total number of concentration courses taken during the student’s college career (including study abroad or transfer credits) must be at least 13. Students who substitute more advanced courses for Physics 15b and/or 15c must complete the lab component of these courses, on a pass/fail basis. See the Co-Director of Undergraduate Studies for further information.
      4. Teaching: Students who are interested in receiving eligibility for the certification needed to teach both physics and chemistry in public schools are invited to look at Degree in Physics with Teacher Certification in both Physics and Chemistry under the Physics concentration. Completing the Chemistry and Physics concentration with eligibility for teacher certification in both physics and chemistry requires taking the UTEP program, in addition to the required courses listed in items 1a–h.
      5. Individual Study and Research courses: Physics 90r/91r and Chemistry 91r/98r/99r are optional.
      6. Applied physics and engineering science courses listed in the requirements for the Physics concentration as “counting as physics” for Physics concentrators are also counted as physics courses in the Chemistry and Physics concentration.

    ADVISING

    Students interested in concentrating in Chemistry and Physics should discuss their Plans of Study with the Co-Director of Undergraduate Studies. When Plans of Study are approved, each undergraduate who elects to concentrate in the field is assigned a faculty advisor from either the Physics or Chemistry department. If students do not request a change in advisor, they have the same advisor until they graduate. It is expected that students will discuss their programs and review their progress with faculty advisors at the beginning of each term. Students are told to seek advice at any time and can see their advisors at regularly scheduled office hours or by making an appointment. Students may also seek advice from the Director or Co-Director of Undergraduate Studies or Chair of the Chemistry and Physics Committee at any time.

    For up-to-date information on advising in Chemistry and Physics, please see the Advising Programs Office website.

    RESOURCES

    The resources and facilities available to this concentration are essentially those of the Chemistry and Physics departments combined. Hence the descriptions of those concentrations should be consulted for further information.

    HOW TO FIND OUT MORE

    The pamphlet The SPS Guide to Physics and Related Fields, available from the Co-Director of Undergraduate Studies in Lyman 238, provides useful information about the opportunities for the study of physics and physics-related areas at Harvard. Much of this information is also relevant to the concentration in Chemistry and Physics.

    Advice and personal consultation concerning the concentration can be obtained from the Director of Undergraduate Studies: Professor Howard Georgi, Jefferson 456, georgi@physics.harvard.edu, 617-496-8293; and the Co-Director of Undergraduate Studies, Dr. David Morin, Lyman Laboratory 238, morin@physics.harvard.edu, 617-495-3257. For office hours, check the website. Students should also seek advice from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Chemistry: Dr. Gregg Tucci, tucci@fas.harvard.edu.

    Official acceptance into the concentration program is made only through the office of the Co-Director of Undergraduate Studies, who must approve the Plan of Study.

     

    ENROLLMENT STATISTICS
    Number of Concentrators as of December

    Concentrators 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
    Chemistry and Physics 36 27 31 37 39 31 23 29 27 37
    Chemistry and Physics + another field 4 5 5 5 1 7 4 5 1 2
    Another field + Chemistry and Physics 1 2 2 2 4 4 1 2 1 1








     

    Classics

    Professor David F. Elmer, Director of Undergraduate Studies

    Classics as an intellectual discipline embraces the study of ancient Greece and Rome, two civilizations whose legacy has played a major role in shaping our modern world. The Greeks and Romans produced literature and philosophy of enduring power and impact; they created art and architecture of unsurpassed grace and beauty; they made discoveries in science and math that anticipate principles and theorems re-discovered in the Renaissance; they grappled with problems of economics and governance that still challenge us today. In short, the Greco-Roman world provides the modern student with a laboratory of the human condition. Hence, the Department of the Classics encourages its students to explore the whole range of Greco-Roman civilization from the Bronze Age through Byzantium and medieval Europe to Modern Greece.

    To study Classics at Harvard, no prior knowledge of an ancient language is required. Students may either start Greek and/or Latin from scratch, or build upon prior knowledge by taking more advanced courses. Two concentration options are offered within the department: Classical Languages and Literatures, for students wishing to emphasize the study of Greek and Latin literature in the original languages; and Classical Civilizations, for those primarily interested in exploring Greco-Roman culture through an archaeological, historical, or philosophical lens. Classics is essentially inter-disciplinary, combining the study of language, linguistics, and literature; archaeology, art, and architecture; history; philosophy, science, and medicine; and myth and religion. Hence, in addition to its dedicated Joint Concentration in Ancient History (Greek and Roman), which is offered in conjunction with History, the department welcomes joint concentrators combining Classics with a large number of allied fields.

    As well as requirements in Greek and/or Latin, all concentrators take at least one of the department’s foundational courses in Greek culture & civilization and Roman culture & civilization (Classical Studies 97a and 97b); in the junior year they choose one of a suite of small-group tutorials in advanced research methods (Classics 98); and in their senior year, all Classics concentrators have the option of writing a thesis under faculty supervision (Classics 99, mandatory for joint concentrators). Beyond these requirements, students have a wide range of courses to choose from, including courses in translation. Furthermore, courses from related departments are regularly cross-listed with Classics, so that students can craft the concentration to accommodate their individual interests.

    Classics concentrators have at their disposal the resources of the Herbert Weir Smyth Classical Library, and they are encouraged to conduct primary research on ancient artefacts, coins, manuscripts, and papyri in the unparalleled collections of Houghton Library and the Harvard Art Museums. During the summer, students are given the chance to complement their experience in the classroom by undertaking an internship at one of Harvard’s classical institutes in Washington DC (the Center for Hellenic Studies and Dumbarton Oaks); participating in an archaeological dig; learning to speak Latin in Rome or Greek in Athens; taking summer courses in Italy or Greece; or traveling to Europe (or elsewhere) to learn one of the modern languages that are fundamental for classical scholarship—typically French, German, or Italian.

    By mastering Greek and/or Latin and acquiring the skills necessary to analyze and interpret the remains of Greek and Roman culture, students learn to make sense of material that is both dauntingly complex and disconcertingly fragmentary. The effort of trying to understand the thoughts and actions of people who are separated from us by a gulf of two millennia teaches our students to test their assumptions in every human situation. The challenge of finding out about an aspect of Greco-Roman civilization for which no substantial evidence appears to survive develops resourcefulness and flexibility—research skills that can be transferred to any walk of life. Concentrators in Classics learn to think rigorously and to express themselves precisely in both speech and writing. They go on to excel in fields as varied as business, diplomacy, education, finance, journalism, law, and medicine. In short, a training in Classics is applicable to everything.

     

    REQUIREMENTS
    Classical Languages and Literatures
    Basic requirements: 12 courses (48 credits)

    1. Two courses providing a broad introduction to Classical civilization, normally Classical Studies 97a and 97b.
    2. Six courses in Greek and/or Latin, at least two of which must be numbered 100 or above (H and K are considered 100-level), and at least one of which must be selected from the following list: Greek 112a, Greek 112b, Latin 112a, Latin 112b (or equivalent in the case of Byzantine/Modern Greek and Medieval Latin). Note: Introductory language courses are intended to be taken sequentially. Students may not earn concentration credit for completion of a course sequentially prior to one in which they have already earned a passing grade.
    3. One semester of Classics 98, a small-group tutorial, is required of all concentrators in the junior year. The tutorial emphasizes the development of research skills through a close examination of a topic in Greek and Roman literature and/or Greco-Roman civilization.
    4. Three additional courses from among those listed under Classics in the course search in courses.my.harvard.edu, including cross-listed courses and either Humanities 10a or Humanities 10b. Other courses may be counted with approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
    5. Note: Two courses counted for concentration may be taken Pass/Fail or, in the case of approved Freshman Seminars, SAT/UNS. Classics 98 must be taken for a letter grade.
    6. Honors: Students wishing to be considered for honors must fulfill the basic requirements as specified above, as well as the following:

    -Either-

      1. A senior thesis, together with two semesters of the senior tutorial, Classics 99. The thesis must be submitted to the department office on or before the Friday before the spring recess. The length of the thesis should be decided upon by the student and the thesis adviser but should not ordinarily exceed 60 pages of text.

        -Or-
      2. Two additional courses in Greek or Latin, both of which must normally be letter-graded with a grade of A- or better:
        • 1. Candidates for High Honors: Two of the following courses: Latin H, K; Greek H, K.
        • 2. Candidates for Highest Honors: Both Latin K and Greek K.
        • 3. Candidates for Honors: Any 100-level course in Greek or Latin, plus one of the following courses: Latin H, K; Greek H, K.

    Note: if a student pursues both routes to Honors, the Department's honors recommendation shall be based upon the higher result in the eligible category.

    Joint concentration: Classical Languages and Literatures and Allied Field
    Basic requirements: Seven letter-graded courses (28 credits) in Classics

    1. Classical Studies 97a or 97b.
    2. Classics 98.
    3. Four courses in Greek and/or Latin, at least two of which must be at the 100 level or above (H and K are considered 100-level), and at least one of which must be selected from the following list: Greek 112a, Greek 112b, Latin 112a, Latin 112b (or equivalent in the case of Byzantine/Modern Greek and Medieval Latin). Note: Introductory language courses are intended to be taken sequentially. Students may not earn concentration credit for completion of a course sequentially prior to one in which they have already earned a passing grade.
    4. One additional course from among those listed under Classics in the course search in courses.my.harvard.edu, including cross-listed courses and either Humanities 10a or Humanities 10b. Other courses may be counted with approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
    5. Additional coursework as required by the allied field.
    6. Honors: Thesis required. Two semesters of either Classics 99 or the equivalent in the allied field, as appropriate.

    Classical Civilizations
    Basic requirements: 12 courses (48 credits)

    1. Two courses providing a broad introduction to Classical civilization, normally Classical Studies 97a and 97b.
    2. Four courses in Greek and/or Latin. Note: Introductory language courses are intended to be taken sequentially. Students may not earn concentration credit for completion of a course sequentially prior to one in which they have already earned a passing grade.
    3. One semester of Classics 98, a small-group tutorial, is required of all concentrators in the junior year. The tutorial emphasizes the development of research skills through a close examination of a topic in Greek and Roman literature and/or Greco-Roman civilization.
    4. Classical Studies 112 Regional Study, a multi-disciplinary and problem-based in-depth survey of a region of the ancient Mediterranean world, to be taken at any stage in the Concentration, provided that both 97a and 97b have been completed or the second of these is being taken concurrently.
    5. Four additional courses from among those listed under Classics in the course search in courses.my.harvard.edu, including cross-listed courses and either Humanities 10a or Humanities 10b. Other courses may be counted with approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
    6. Note: Two courses counted for concentration may be taken Pass/Fail or, in the case of approved Freshman Seminars, SAT/UNS. Classics 98 must be taken for a letter grade.
    7. Honors: In addition to the basic requirements set out above, all concentrators in Classical Civilizations who wish to be considered for honors must write a senior thesis by completing two semesters of the senior tutorial, Classics 99. The thesis must be submitted to the department office on or before the Friday before the spring recess. The length of the thesis should be decided upon by the student and the thesis adviser but should not ordinarily exceed 60 pages of text.

    Joint concentration: Classical Civilizations and Allied Field
    Basic requirements: Seven letter-graded courses (28 credits) in Classics

    1. Classical Studies 97a or 97b.
    2. Classics 98.
    3. Two courses in Greek and/or Latin. Note: Introductory language courses are intended to be taken sequentially. Students may not earn concentration credit for completion of a course sequentially prior to one in which they have already earned a passing grade.
    4. Classical Studies 112 Regional Study, a multi-disciplinary and problem-based in-depth survey of a region of the ancient Mediterranean world, to be taken at any stage in the Concentration, provided either 97a or 97b has been completed or is being taken concurrently.
    5. Two additional courses from among those listed under Classics in the course search in courses.my.harvard.edu, including cross-listed courses and either Humanities 10a or Humanities 10b. Other courses may be counted with approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
    6. Additional coursework as required by the allied field.
    7. Honors: Thesis required. Two semesters of either Classics 99 or the equivalent in the allied field, as appropriate.

    Joint Concentration in Ancient History (Greek and Roman)
    Basic requirements: Fourteen courses (56 credits)

    1. Concentration requirements for the Joint Concentration in Ancient History (Greek and Roman): 14 courses (56 credits)
    2. Classical Language Courses (4 courses): Four courses of study of one or two classical languages.
    3. Additional Coursework (8 courses)
      1. History 97.
      2. Classical Studies 97a or 97b.
        History 97 is offered in the spring term only; if combining with Classical Studies 97b (on Rome), also offered in the spring, students may choose either to take both during their sophomore spring, or to take one in the sophomore spring and the other in the junior spring.
      3. Classics 98. Must be completed by the end of the junior spring, in preparation for the senior thesis.
      4. Classical Studies 112.
      5. One non-Western History course.
      6. One modern History course.
      7. Two additional electives within Ancient History.
        Additional note: One of the four history courses should be a seminar that results in a research paper of at least 20 pages and involving primary source research and that is completed before the end of the junior year.
    4. Senior Thesis (2 courses): either History 99 or Classics 99. Students may select either seminar.

    Please also note the following information:

    Students who complete the thesis will be eligible for honors; the department in which the student chooses to take the senior tutorial will be responsible for making the final determination of honors.

    Two types of courses count toward Ancient History (Greek and Roman) concentration requirements:

    1. Courses listed in the course catalog's "History" section and "Classics" section, including cross-listed courses.
    2. Courses taught in the General Education and/or Freshman Seminar programs by full members of the History or Classics Department faculty. Students wishing to count such courses toward their concentration requirements should request approval from the relevant Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students may also apply to do an independent study, History 91r or Classics 93r, with a member of the relevant Department; History 91r/Classics 93r can be used to fulfill one of the elective course requirements.

    ADVISING

    At the beginning of each semester concentrators meet with the Director of Undergraduate Studies to discuss their Plans of Study and their progress through the concentration. In addition, junior and senior members of the department are available throughout the year to offer advice on particular academic matters as the need arises.

    For up-to-date information on advising in Classics, please see the Advising Programs Office website.

    RESOURCES

    The Smyth Classical Library, on the top floor of Widener Library, is open to all concentrators in the department. It contains an extensive and up-to-date collection of Greek and Latin authors, principal commentaries, works of reference, corpora of inscriptions, and major books on classical archaeology, history, literature, and philosophy. The library is locked at all times because there is no regular attendant. Key-card access will be granted to any concentrator upon request. Items from the McDaniel collection of antiquities illustrating Greek and Roman life, together with an extensive collection of ancient coins, are housed in the Harvard Art Museums. The antiquities are available for study by qualified students.

    HOW TO FIND OUT MORE

    For further information about the concentration, contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor David F. Elmer (classicsDUS@fas.harvard.edu, 617-495-4019).

     

    ENROLLMENT STATISTICS
    Number of Concentrators as of December

    Concentrators 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
    Classics 34 41 42 36 39 38 37 24 26 25
    Classics + another field 4 4 4 4 1 6 5 6 9 7
    Another field + Classics 1 0 2 3 5 7 6 4 5 9








     

    Comparative Literature

    Dr. Sandra Naddaff, Director of Undergraduate Studies

    The undergraduate program in Comparative Literature prepares students to play an active and creative role in today’s globalized world by exploring literature and culture across languages and national borders. Working in more than one language, our students investigate the inter-connections among literatures, cultures, and media to explore the human experience in a comparative and interdisciplinary context.

    The flexible nature of the concentration allows students to develop a program of study both within and beyond the Humanities based on their particular languages and interests. Some students craft a curriculum in Literature and the Arts, linking the study of literature with film, music, theater, digital media, or creative writing. Others design a program that connects literary study to contemporary concerns and disciplines beyond the Humanities, focusing their work on the relationship between Literature and Medicine, or Literature and Law, or Literature and Ethics, for example. Still other students find in the study of Comparative Literature a place for the comparative study of multiple literatures, World Literature, and translation, or the examination of aesthetics, philosophy, and literary and cultural theory. Our concentrators work across many languages—Hindi, French, Spanish, English, Chinese, Hebrew, Italian, Latin, Arabic, Swahili—to name but a few. We welcome work in any foreign language in which a student has an interest. In cases where a student does not have the necessary linguistic competence to undertake literary study, we are happy to help make arrangements towards fluency.

    In consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies and the student’s academic advisor, undergraduate concentrators develop an individually tailored and carefully structured program of study that brings together their particular interests and languages and allows them to take courses in a variety of departments across the Humanities. Central to each student’s curriculum is the tutorial program. The one-semester sophomore tutorial seminar introduces students to various disciplinary methodologies and forms of literary and cultural analysis. Junior tutorial offers students the rare opportunity to design their own reading course in which they work one on one with a tutor and ultimately develop a special field of study. Students may, however, opt out of junior tutorial in order to take additional courses in a non-English language or in Comparative Literature.  (See #2 in Tutorials below.) Senior tutorial is again an individual course of study largely devoted to the research and writing of the senior thesis, which is required of all students. All tutorials are reading and writing intensive, and form the core around which a student develops a larger program of study. For more information about students’ special fields and senior thesis projects, please see the “Undergraduate Concentration” link on our website, www.complit.fas.harvard.edu.

    Students with degrees in Comparative Literature develop habits of mind that serve them well in any number of professional endeavors. The ability to write well, to read critically, to argue analytically, and to speak eloquently, translates fluently to a variety of fields. Our graduates include doctors, lawyers, literary scholars, cultural critics, investment bankers, actors, novelists, consultants, and journalists among many others. For a fuller list of our alumni, please consult the “Lit alumni” link on our website, www.complit.fas.harvard.edu.

    In order to help students determine whether they can meet their academic and intellectual goals in our department, we ask interested students to apply to the concentration during the fall of the sophomore year, although later applications will also be considered whenever possible. Application includes submitting a brief statement of interest and essay, as well as a conversation with two members of the department.

    REQUIREMENTS
    14 courses (56 credits)

    1. Required Courses:
      1. Comparative Literature 97; Comparative Literature 98a and 98b or tutorial alternative. See 2B below; Comparative Literature 99a and 99b (see item 2, Tutorials).
      2. Three courses from among the courses listed under Comparative Literature in the course search in courses.my.harvard.edu, including those courses cross-listed under Comparative Literature. Each of these courses must be passed with a grade of B– or above.
      3. Three courses in one or more non-English literatures, each passed with a grade of B– or above. Note: A student may petition the Director of Undergraduate Studies to take one non-English course at the advanced language level for concentration credit in this category.
      4. Three courses drawn from a variety of related departments. These may include, but are not limited to, additional courses in Comparative Literature; English literature; non-English or classical literatures or folklore and mythology (including additional courses in the literature chosen under 1c above); philosophy; visual and environmental studies; studies of women, gender, and sexuality; linguistics. Students should consult the Director of Undergraduate Studies to determine whether a specific course will count for concentration credit in this category.
    2. Tutorials:
      1. Sophomore year: Comparative Literature 97. A grade of B- or above is required.
      2. Junior year: Comparative Literature 98a and 98b. Graded SAT/UNS. A grade of SAT in both semesters is required in order to continue on to Comparative Literature 99a and 99b. Alternatively, Junior concentrators in Comparative Literature can petition to substitute one or two courses in place of the junior tutorial. These courses must be from the Comparative Literature departmental listings or courses that support non-English language learning at any level. Students must petition the Director of Undergraduate Studies by the end of the second semester of sophomore year.
      3. Senior year: Comparative Literature 99a and 99b (the writing of the senior thesis). Graded SAT/UNS. In order for a student to receive a grade of SAT for the first semester of senior tutorial, one chapter of the thesis must be submitted by the end of the semester in which the thesis work is begun.
    3. A junior essay of 20-25 pages (5,000-6,250 words) is required of all students enrolled in the junior year tutorial. Students who do not enroll in junior tutorial must, in consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies, make arrangements to complete a junior essay.
    4. A senior thesis of 45-70 pages (11,250-17,500 words) is required of all concentrators in the senior year.
    5. General Examination: A 75-minute oral examination at the end of the senior year. This exam will include a thesis defense, as well as an intellectual autobiography. The examination committee will consist of three members, and will ideally include the student’s junior tutor and one reader of the senior thesis.
    6. Study Abroad: Comparative Literature encourages study abroad for one semester of the junior year. Students who study abroad take only one term of junior tutorial, although they must still complete the junior essay and 14 total concentration courses.

    JOINT CONCENTRATION

    It is possible to pursue a joint concentration with Comparative Literature as either a primary or allied field. Please make an appointment with the Director of Undergraduate Studies to discuss specific requirements.

    ADVISING

    Each Comparative Literature concentrator is assigned a tutor who also functions as the student’s adviser. In the sophomore year, this tutor is assigned by the Director of Undergraduate Studies, but in following years a student may either request a tutor from among the faculty members of the Department of Comparative Literature and the Tutorial Board; or the student will be assigned a tutor (generally a member of the Tutorial Board) by the Director of Undergraduate Studies according to the student's interests. Generally, this tutor changes from year to year as the student’s program and interests change. In certain cases, however, a student may request the same tutor for more than one year.

    The department offers a variety of courses that might be of interest to freshmen and first-semester sophomores, but it has no specific course that is a pre-requisite. Students who are interested in the program might wish to take any of the 100-level courses listed in Comparative Literature in the course search in courses.my.harvard.edu. Students interested in Comparative Literature might also wish to take a language course in their language of choice, if they wish to improve their non-English language competency.

    For up-to-date information on advising in Comparative Literature, please see the Advising Programs Office website.

    HOW TO FIND OUT MORE

    Freshmen interested in finding out more about Comparative Literature should contact Dr. Sandra Naddaff by email (snaddaff@fas.harvard.edu) or should make an appointment to see her during office hours by calling 617-495-4186.

    For general information contact Dr. Sandra Naddaff, Director of Undergraduate Studies; or Ms. Isaure Mignotte, Comparative Literature Program Coordinator, at Dana Palmer House, 617-495-4186.

     

    ENROLLMENT STATISTICS
    Number of Concentrators as of December

    Concentrators 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
    Comparative Literature 48 38 41 40 39 33 26 27 16 22
    Comparative Literature + another field 1 1 2 1 2 5 4 2 5 5
    Another field + Comparative Literature 2 0 1 1 2 2 3 3 3 5








     

    Computer Science

    Professor Stephen Chong, Co-Director of Undergraduate Studies

    Professor Boaz Barak, Co-Director of Undergraduate Studies

    Computer science is a dynamic, versatile field, full of open problems and opportunities for creative invention. Computer science is not just about tools and technology. Whether it is swarms of insects, elementary particles, rational agents in a market, or the neurons in the brain, the computational viewpoint has proven an extremely fruitful way to understand natural, social, and engineered systems. Correspondingly, the Computer Science concentration has strong ties not just to engineering, but also economics, law, biology, physics, statistics, mathematics, and more.

    The concentration in Computer Science is designed to teach students skills they will use immediately and ideas they will exploit in the future in ways unimaginable today. Because information technology affects every aspect of society, graduates with computer science degrees have open to them an enormous variety of careers—engineering, teaching, medicine, law, basic science, entertainment, management, and countless others.

    The Computer Science concentration has the following learning objectives. Our graduates should be able to:

    1. Design and code correct solutions to problems.
    2. Design a system, identifying trade-offs on dimensions such as performance, usability, robustness, security, and durability.
    3. Design an algorithm to solve a problem. Reason about the algorithm's properties—correctness, specifications, time complexity.
    4. Starting from an informal, English language description of a problem, give a fully formal description of it, and prove something about the behavior of the system.
    5. Compose a large data set from networked sources, draw some inferences about it, and convey those conclusions effectively to others visually and verbally.
    6. Be able to explain to a novice about how computers work, from the hardware to a user-visible application.
    7. Explain how a solution designed for a specific domain can be applied to another domain.
    8. Explain the appropriateness of alternative system designs to the social context in which the system would be used.
    9. When presented with a technical solution to a problem, formulate a set of questions that probe the solution for its soundness.
    10. Conduct an "experiment" to study an algorithm or system, ideally one designed by someone else.
    11. Pick up and work with new environments (languages, APIs, OS-es, simulators, etc.) independently and efficiently.
    12. After listening to a CS colloquium talk, objectively analyze and critique the work.
    13. Apply computational approaches in the natural sciences, the social sciences, and the humanities.
    14. Decompose a large problem into a collection of manageable, interrelated tasks.

    In addition to these technical objectives, we identified five softer objectives. We hope our graduates will be able to:

    1. Present ideas clearly and forcefully, both orally and in writing.
    2. Solve problems cooperatively and in an ethically principled way.
    3. Apply their strengths to areas of known weakness and discomfort.
    4. Work productively, responsibly, and effectively within a group.
    5. Adapt to changes in the technological landscape.

    REQUIREMENTS

    There are four types of concentrations in Computer Science: Basic Concentration, Honors Concentration, Joint Concentration, and the Mind, Brain, Behavior track of the Computer Science concentration.

    The number of credits required for each degree depends on the student’s mathematics placement. The ranges given here depend on whether the student starts mathematics at the Mathematics 1a, Mathematics 1b, or Mathematics 21a level. (With good planning it is also possible to earn a Computer Science degree starting with Mathematics Ma.) For example, a basic concentration requires 48 credits (12 courses), of which Mathematics 1a and/or Mathematics 1b can be waived, depending on placement, to reduce the number to 44 or 40 credits (11 or 10 courses).

    In all of the requirements below, a student may replace a course with another course covering the same material at a more advanced level. For example, Mathematics 21b can be replaced with Mathematics 25a. For information on which courses are considered acceptable replacement, see our website or ask the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

    No student may reduce concentration requirements by omitting any other course other than Mathematics 1a or Mathematics 1b: any other required course not taken must be replaced by a similar course at a more advanced level.

    The four concentration options share the following common requirement structure.

    • Basic mathematics
    • Basic software
    • Theory
    • Technical electives (including the breadth requirement)

    Basic Requirements: 10-12 courses (40-48 credits)

    1. Required courses:
      1. Basic Mathematics (2-4 courses):
        1. Mathematics 1a and Mathematics 1b, if needed as preparation.
        2. Linear algebra: Any one of Mathematics 21b, Applied Mathematics 22a, Applied Mathematics 21b, Mathematics 22b, Mathematics 23a, Mathematics 25a, or Mathematics 55a, or a more advanced linear algebra course.
        3. Probability/statistics or Multivariable calculus: One of the following. Either Statistics 110 or a more advanced probability or statistics course, or one of Mathematics 21a, Applied Mathematics 22b, Applied Mathematics 21a, Mathematics 22a, Mathematics 23b, Mathematics 23c, Mathematics 25b, Mathematics 55b, or a more advanced multivariable calculus or analysis course.
          Students that take all three of a linear algebra course, multivariate calculus course and probability/statistics course can count the probability/statistics course as a technical elective (see below).
      2. Basic Software (2 courses): Two out of the following three courses: Computer Science 50, Computer Science 51, and Computer Science 61. Students who take all three courses may count one of Computer Science 51 or Computer Science 61 as a technical elective (see below).
      3. Theory (2 courses): Computer Science 121, plus any one additional theory course, including Computer Science courses numbered in the 120s and 220s, and Applied Mathematics 107. The recommended way to satisfy the theory requirement is to take both Computer Science 121 and Computer Science 124.
      4. Technical Electives (4 courses): Courses may be drawn from the following list:
        1. Computer Science courses numbered greater than 50 (including 91r). A student who takes all three of Computer Science 50, Computer Science 51, and Computer Science 61 may count either Computer Science 51 or Computer Science 61 as a technical elective.
        2. Statistics 110 and 195; Computer Science 20; Mathematics 154; Applied Mathematics 106, 107, 120, and 121; at most one of Engineering Sciences 50, 52, or 54; Engineering Sciences 153 or Physics 123; Engineering Sciences 170 and 256; Applied Computation 221.
        3. Many—but not all—MIT “Course 6” courses can be used as technical electives. Consult the DUS before enrolling.
      5. Breadth Requirement: In order to ensure breadth in the program two of the four technical electives must be Computer Science courses from different course groupings from the following lists, as identified by the penultimate digit of the course number:
        Computer Science courses with penultimate digit 0, 1, 2, and 9 are valid technical electives if not used to satisfy other concentration requirements, but do not contribute to the breadth requirement
        1. 3: Economics and Computation (any course of the form CS13x or CS23x)
        2. 4: Hardware and Networks (any course of the form CS14x or of the form CS24x. Physics 123 and Engineering Sciences 153 count in this group as well).
        3. 5: Programming Languages (CS51 if counted as a technical elective, or any other course of the form CS15x or CS25x).
        4. 6: Systems (CS61 if counted as a technical elective, or any other course of the form CS16x or CS26x)
        5. 7: Graphics, Visualization, and User Interfaces (any course of the form CS17x or CS27x).8: Artificial Intelligence (any course of the form CS18x or CS28x).
    2. Tutorial: Optional. Available as Computer Science 91r. This course is repeatable, but may be taken at most twice for academic credit, and only one semester of Computer Science 91r may be counted toward concentration requirements. Students wishing to enroll in Computer Science 91r must file a project proposal to be signed by the student and the faculty supervisor and approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. The project proposal form can be found on the Computer Science website.
    3. Thesis: None.
    4. General Examination: None
    5. Other Information:
      1. Approved courses: With the approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, courses other than those listed above may be used to satisfy requirements. If a course is cross-listed with another department it meets the same requirements for the concentration as the Computer Science numbered course. To satisfy any of the requirements 1.1, 1.2, or 1.3, a substituted course must be in the same area of mathematics or computer science but more advanced than the stipulated course. Students must secure advance approval for course substitutions by filing a Plan of Study to be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. The Plan of Study form and a description of the process to submit the form can be found on the Computer Science website.
      2. Pass/Fail and Sat/Unsat: None of the courses used to satisfy concentration requirements may be taken Pass/Fail. Computer Science 50 will count for concentration credit if it is taken for a grade of SAT.
      3. Credit for prior work: Except for Math 1ab, there is no reduction in concentration requirements for prior work. As noted in 1.2 above, students who skip CS50 must take both CS51 and CS61. Rarely, students wish, on the basis of prior experience, to skip CS51 or CS61 or courses such as Math 21a or Math 21b. They may be allowed to do so, with the prior approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, if they substitute a more advanced course of the same kind: for example, CS152 in place of CS51, CS161 in place of CS61, Math 112 or Applied Math 105 in place of Math 21a, and Math 121 or Applied Math 120 in place of Math 21b.
      4. Plans of study: Concentrators must file a Plan of Study showing how they intend to satisfy these degree requirements, and keep their plan of study up to date until their program is complete. If the plan is acceptable, the student will be notified that it has been approved. To petition for an exception to any rule, the student should file a new plan of study and notify the Director of Undergraduate Studies of the rationale for any exceptional conditions. Approval of a plan of study is the student’s guarantee that a given set of courses will satisfy degree requirements. The Plan of Study form and a description of the process to submit the form can be found on the Computer Science website.

    Requirements for Honors Eligibility: 12-14 courses (48-56 credits)

    1. Required courses:
      1. Basic Mathematics (2-4 courses): Same as Basic Requirements.
      2. Basic Software (2 courses): Same as Basic Requirements.
      3. Theory (2 courses): Same as Basic Requirements.
      4. Technical Electives (6 courses): 6 courses from same list as Basic Requirements.
      5. Breadth Requirement: For the honors track, three of the six technical electives must be Computer Science courses from different course groupings, as identified by the penultimate digit of the course number (see Basic Requirements for list of areas and restrictions).
    2. Tutorial: Same as Basic Requirements.
    3. Thesis: Optional but encouraged. See honors requirements on the Computer Science website. Students writing theses are often enrolled in Computer Science 91r. This course is repeatable, but may be taken at most twice for academic credit, and only one semester of Computer Science 91r may be counted toward concentration requirements. Students wishing to enroll in Computer Science 91r must file a project proposal to be signed by the student and the faculty supervisor and approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. The project proposal form can be found on the Computer Science website.
    4. General Examination: None.
    5. Other information:
      1. Approved courses: Same as Basic Requirements.
      2. Pass/Fail and Sat/Unsat: Same as Basic Requirements.
      3. Credit for prior work: Same as Basic Requirements.
      4. Plans of Study: Same as Basic Requirements.

    Requirements for Joint Concentrations: 36-44 credits for CS field (9-11 courses for CS field)

    Joint concentrations with certain other fields are possible. This option is intended for students who have interests in the intersection of two fields, not simply in the two fields independently; for example, a combined concentration in computer science and linguistics might be appropriate for a student with a special interest in computational linguistics. Course requirements are the same as for the Requirements for Honors Eligibility, except that only three technical electives are required. These three technical electives must satisfy the breadth requirement as stated in Breadth Requirement, with the further provision that one semester of Computer Science 91r may be used to satisfy the breadth requirement for joint concentrations. Such courses may also be double-counted towards the requirements of the other field. Joint concentrations are not “double majors.” Joint concentrators should be interested in the overlap between two fields, not simply in both. A thesis in the intersection of the fields is required for joint concentrators, read by both concentrations. The student is typically awarded the minimum honors recommended by the two concentrations separately. These requirements, including the thesis requirement, are the same whether Computer Science is the primary field or the allied field of the joint concentration. Students interested in combined programs should consult the Director of Undergraduate Studies at an early date and should work carefully with both concentrations to ensure all deadlines and requirements of both concentrations are met. Students with separate interests in more than one field should consider a secondary rather than a joint concentration, or simply using some of their electives to study one of the fields. We advise all our joint concentrators to make sure that they satisfy the non-joint requirements for at least one concentration, in case they are unable to complete a thesis.

    The Mind, Brain, and Behavior Program

    Students interested in addressing questions of neuroscience and cognition from the perspective of computer science may pursue a special program of study affiliated with the University-wide Mind, Brain, and Behavior Initiative, that allows them to participate in a variety of related activities. (Similar programs are available through the Anthropology, History and Science, Human Evolutionary Biology, Linguistics, Neurobiology, Philosophy, and Psychology concentrations.) Requirements for this honors-only program are based on those of the computer science Requirements for Honors Eligibility, as explained below:

    Requirements for Mind, Brain, and Behavior Program: 12-14 courses (48-56 credits)

    1. Required courses:
      1. Basic Mathematics (2-4 courses): Same as Honors Requirements.
      2. Basic Software (2 courses): Same as Honors Requirements.
      3. Theory (2 courses): Same as Honors Requirements, except that Statistics 110 may count towards the second theory course. Statistics 110 is an option for the theory requirement only in the MBB track.
      4. Technical Electives (4 courses):
        1. MCB 80 or MCB 81
        2. One approved biology or psychology course
        3. An approved MBB junior tutorial
        4. Computer Science 181 or 182
      5. Breadth Requirement (2 courses): Two courses from different course groupings, identified by the penultimate digit of the course number (3, 4, 5, 6, 7) (see Basic Requirements for list of areas and restrictions). Group 8 is not an option for the breadth requirement in MBB programs, but Computer Science 91r may also be used to satisfy the breadth requirement. (SLS 20 is not an approved course for the Computer Science MBB track.)
    2. Tutorial: Same as Honors Requirements.
    3. Thesis: A computationally-oriented thesis on a Mind, Brain, and Behavior-related topic is required. Students pursuing thesis research may want to enroll in Computer Science 91r under Technical Electives.
    4. General Examination: None.
    5. Other information:
      1. Approved courses: Same as Honors Requirements.
      2. Pass/Fail and Sat/Unsat: Same as Honors Requirements.
      3. Credit for prior work: Same as Honors Requirements.
      4. Plans of Study: Same as Honors Requirements.

    Students pursuing the Mind, Brain, and Behavior track are assigned an adviser in the field and are expected to participate in the University-wide Mind, Brain, and Behavior research milieu, including a non-credit senior year seminar for Mind, Brain, and Behavior thesis writers. To participate in the MBB track, students must both complete the Computer Science concentration Plan of Study and register at the beginning of every academic year on the MBB website. Interested students should contact the Computer Science liaison to the MBB program, Professor Stuart Shieber (shieber@seas.harvard.edu).

    ADVISING

    Students interested in concentrating in Computer Science are urged to consult the Director of Undergraduate Studies early and often for advice on placement in courses and selection among courses. The Director of Undergraduate Studies is happy to talk with freshmen and sophomores about their Plans of Study and to answer questions. When a student enters the concentration mid-way through the sophomore year, the Director of Undergraduate Studies assigns a professor to serve as the student’s faculty adviser. Every effort is made to match the student’s special interests to the expertise of the adviser. Students should consult their advisers regularly, certainly at the beginning of each term. When a faculty adviser is on leave, the student is temporarily reassigned to a new adviser. Students desiring a change of adviser for any reason should contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies. The Director of Undergraduate Studies is also available to discuss problems or questions of any kind with students in the concentration.

    HOW TO FIND OUT MORE

    Students interested in computer science are invited to join the mailing list for the Computer Science Newsletter, which carries announcements of new courses, colloquia, job and internship opportunities, and a variety of get-togethers for the Harvard computer science community. Information about the newsletter and other community resources can be found on the Computer Science website.

    For further information, students should consult the Director of Undergraduate Studies, (cs-dus@seas.harvard.edu).

    ENROLLMENT STATISTICS
    Number of Concentrators as of December

    Concentrators 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
    Computer Science 86 86 99 143 198 253 263 306 363 394
    Computer Science + another field 4 7 10 13  17 22 32 42 47 59
    Another field + Computer Science 4 8 10 15  7 18 21 24 25 41








     

    Earth and Planetary Sciences

    Professor Miaki Ishii, Head Tutor


    Harvard offers outstanding opportunities for students who wish to pursue studies in Earth and planetary sciences. Research and course work in the Earth and Planetary Sciences (EPS) department encompass a broad range of science disciplines, technology, and applications to environmental and economic endeavors. These studies involve students in the development and application of new tools and technologies, state-of-the-art computational modeling of a wide range of Earth planetary processes, and field work in remote and challenging settings.

    These are intellectually exciting times for the Earth and planetary sciences, which are of unprecedented importance to contemporary society. Our environment is increasingly subject to stresses placed upon it. As never before, we have an imperative to better understand the consequences of human activities for the Earth’s atmosphere, the oceans, the solid Earth, and the organisms that live on it. Exploring for, extracting, and conserving natural resources are vital to the global political economy. We must mitigate the ill effects of earthquakes, landslides, volcanic eruptions, and climate change by learning to predict their time and place. Moreover, new technologies, datasets and computational capacity are allowing us to better understand the functioning of Earth systems and the interplay between tectonics, climate, and life.

    Because the Earth’s natural systems (atmosphere, ocean, biosphere, solid earth) are interconnected, the training of Earth and planetary scientists broadly spans the boundaries between biology, chemistry, engineering, physics, mathematics, and the Earth sciences themselves, and provides a broad intellectual foundation that is beyond what is typically possible in a "pure" science program. The department trains students rigorously in the basic sciences, typically in the same foundational courses as students in Astrophysics, Chemistry, Engineering Sciences, and Physics. These foundational courses are followed by upper-level courses that focus on disciplines within Earth and planetary sciences. Within the EPS department students may focus on atmospheric and ocean science, energy and climate, environmental geoscience, geobiology, geochemistry, geology, planetary sciences, and solid earth geophysics.

    To facilitate and reinforce our interdisciplinary vision, students are required to take at least one course in each of the three major sub-disciplines in the department: Atmosphere(s) and Oceans; Earth History and Geobiology; and Geology, Geophysics and Planetary Science. Moreover, all students are encouraged to participate in department-sponsored field experiences. Many students complete their studies with a senior thesis that affords the opportunity to do original research under the guidance of department faculty.

    Career opportunities in Earth and planetary sciences are diverse, spanning the private, government, and academic sectors. Government service includes research and administration in NASA, the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Agency, the US Geological Survey, the Environmental Protection Agency, and many other agencies and departments. Earth scientists work in and direct a number of oil and mineral exploration and production companies. Many opportunities continue to grow for entrepreneurs who build companies specializing in resources, natural hazards, waste repositories and cleanup, and environmental impacts. There also are abundant opportunities in the academic world for those continuing on to graduate degrees; and in addition to scientific career paths, an undergraduate degree in Earth and planetary sciences provides an excellent background for continuing study in law, business, and medicine.

    The research environment of the department is an unparalleled resource for undergraduate education. Concentrators may work with faculty and graduate students on major research projects as a research or field assistant, in the context of course work, or as part of an undergraduate research project. Class sizes are small and student-professor contact is frequent and informal. Each graduating senior becomes personally acquainted with numerous faculty members in the department. Writing a senior thesis, which may be based on field, laboratory, or theoretical research, provides students with the opportunity to explore beyond the elementary level in one or more of the subspecialties of Earth and planetary sciences.

    REQUIREMENTS
    Requirements: 14 courses (56 credits)

    1. Required courses:

    A. EPS Courses (6 courses): At least one course at the 50- or 100-level sampling all three sub-disciplines: Atmosphere(s) and Oceans; Earth History and Geobiology; and Geology, Geophysics, and Planetary Science.

    i. A minimum of 2 foundational courses from either EPS 10 or GENED 1018, 1085, 1094,1098, 1137 and 30 and all 50-level EPS courses. NB: No more than one of these from EPS 10 or GENED 1018, 1085, 1094,1098, 1137, and 30. Ordinarily, in order for an SPU course to count toward concentration credit a student should take it prior to enrolling in any EPS courses.
    ii. Four additional courses in EPS, at least three of which must be numbered 99 or above.

    B. Basic science requirements (6-7 courses):

    i. Physics: (2-3 courses): Options a and b are preferred.

    a. Physical Sciences 12a and 12b -or-
    b.Physics 15a, 15b, and 15c -or-
    c. Applied Physics 50a and 50b -or-
    d. Physical Sciences 2 and 3 by petition.

    ii. Chemistry (2 courses):

    a. Physical Sciences 11 followed by Chemistry 17 or higher or EPS-ESE 133

    If a student has taken Physical Sciences 1 before declaring EPS concentration, Physical Sciences 1 can be used in place of Physical Sciences 11.

    iii. Mathematics (2 courses) through or above Applied Mathematics 22a and 22b Mathematics 21a and 21b.

    C. Additional courses (ordinarily 1-2 courses) in EPS or selected courses in related fields to complete the requirement of at least 14 courses.

    2. Honors eligibility: EPS 99r, Senior Thesis Tutorial. Students must complete at least one term of EPS 99r to be eligible for honors. EPS 99r must be taken for a letter grade. One semester of EPS 99r will count toward concentration credit in 1.A.ii. An oral presentation of the thesis is required.


    3. Tutorial: Required. (Generally taken in the sophomore year. Non-credit.)


    4. Thesis: Optional for basic concentration; required for departmental (English) honors.


    5. General Examination: None.


    6. Substitutions: Advanced placement may be used to allow students to complete higher-level courses under A-B; but a minimum of two physics, two chemistry, and two mathematics courses must be completed to satisfy concentration requirements. Students interested in substituting a course in place of the above requirements should consult their EPS concentration adviser and submit a petition to the Academic Administrator.

    7. Other information:

    A. None of the courses required for concentrators may be taken Pass/Fail and C– is normally the minimum acceptable grade.

    B. Students must complete the two foundational courses by the end of their first year in the concentration (ordinarily no later than the first semester of the junior year).

    C. Students are strongly encouraged to consult with a faculty adviser during freshman year to plan appropriate choices of coursework in math, chemistry, and physics.

    D. Related fields: Includes selected departmental courses offered in Applied Mathematics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Computer Science, Engineering Sciences, Environmental Science and Public Policy, Mathematics, Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Physics, and Statistics which count towards the respective concentration requirements. Courses offered through the General Education program are not admissible for the related field requirement, except as noted above in 1.

    E. Math Ma, 1a, 1b; Life Sciences 1A and 1B normally do not count toward concentration credit.

    F. Thematic Plan of Study: Students must discuss and develop individual plans of study together with their concentration adviser. Students are strongly encouraged to focus their departmental coursework in a thematic subfield (atmospheric and ocean science, energy and climate, environmental geoscience, geobiology, geochemistry, geology, planetary sciences, or solid earth geophysics).

    G. Summer School/Study Abroad: Courses from study abroad, Harvard Summer School, or other Harvard schools may count toward concentration credit if approved by the EPS Undergraduate Committee prior to the student’s enrollment in these courses. Students must petition for such credit by contacting the Academic Administrator. Freshman Seminars normally do not count for concentration credit.

    H. Freshman Seminars: Freshman Seminars ordinarily do not count for concentration credit because they are Sat/Unsat courses.

    I. Field Trips: An important aspect of the EPS concentration is participation in field trips and/or summer and January field camps, supported by the department.

    Joint Concentration Requirements: 11 courses (44 credits)

    1. Required Courses:

    A. EPS courses (5 courses).

    i. A minimum of 2 foundational courses from either EPS 10 or GENED 1018, 1085, 1094, 1098, 1137, and 30 and all 50-level EPS courses. NB: No more than one of these from EPS 10 or GENED 1018, 1085, 1094,1098, 1137, and 30. Ordinarily, in order for GENED course to count toward concentration credit a student should take it prior to enrolling in any EPS courses.
    ii. Three additional courses in EPS, at least two of which must be numbered 99 or above.

    B. Basic science requirements (6-7 courses):

    i. Physics: (2-3 courses): Options a and b are preferred

    a. Physical Sciences 12a and 12b -or-
    b. Physics 15a, 15b, and 15c 
-or-
    c. Applied Physics 50a and 50b-or-
    d. Physical Sciences 2 and 3 by petition.

    ii. Chemistry: (2 courses)

    a. Physical Sciences 11 followed by Chemistry 17 or higher or EPS-ES 133

    If a student has taken Physical Sciences 1 before declaring EPS concentration, Physical Sciences 1 can be used in place of Physical Sciences 11.

    iii. Mathematics (2 courses) through or above Applied Mathematics 22a and 22b or Mathematics 21a and 21b.

    2. Honors eligibility: EPS 99: Senior Thesis Tutorial, or similar course in the student’s other concentration. Students must complete at least one term as part of the joint concentration. EPS 99 must be taken for a letter grade. One semester of EPS 99 will count toward concentration credit in 1.A.ii. An oral presentation of the thesis is required.


    3. Tutorial: Required. (Generally taken in the first year of declaring. Non-credit.)


    4. Thesis: Required. An oral presentation of the thesis is required. An EPS faculty member must serve as a thesis reader.


    5. General Examination: None.


    6. Substitutions: Advanced placement may be used to allow students to complete higher-level courses under B; but a minimum of two physics, two chemistry, and two mathematics courses must be completed to satisfy concentration requirements. Students interested in substituting a course in place of the above requirements should consult their EPS concentration adviser and submit a petition to the Academic Administrator.


    7. Other information: Same as Concentration Requirements.

     

    ADVISING

    At the beginning of the first term of concentration each student is assigned a faculty adviser. Students normally continue with the same adviser throughout their concentration, although advisers may be changed upon student request. For students writing a thesis, the senior thesis adviser will also act as an additional concentration adviser. Students should meet individually with their advisers at least once each term to discuss course selections and other academic matters. Students may also seek advice from the Head Tutor at any time. Students seeking additional advising about course options in chemistry are encouraged to speak with Professor James G. Anderson Link Bldg 270, 495-5922; Anderson@huarp.harvard.edu)

    For up-to-date information on advising in Earth and Planetary Sciences, please see the Advising Programs Office website.

    RESOURCES

    The Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences is housed partly in the Hoffman Laboratory of Experimental Geology, which is directly connected with department classrooms and offices in the Geological Museum on Oxford Street. Physical oceanography and some of the atmospheric sciences are housed in Pierce Hall, just across Oxford Street from Hoffman Laboratory. Biological oceanography and paleontology are housed in the Geological Museum, with direct connection through the museum to the parts of the department located in Hoffman Laboratory.

    HOW TO FIND OUT MORE

    All essential information about the concentration is included. Additional information may be obtained from the department’s Academic Office, on the fourth floor of Hoffman Laboratory, or from the Head Tutor, or on our website. Outside of the Academic Office, Hoffman 4th floor, is a bulletin board that contains many notices of job opportunities, lectures, fellowships, and other matters of interest.

    Head Tutor Professor Miaki Ishii, Geological Museum 202C, 617-384-8066, ishii@eps.harvard.edu;

    Academic Administrator Chenoweth Moffatt, Hoffman Laboratory Room 402, 617-384-9760, moffatt@eps.harvard.edu.

     

    ENROLLMENT STATISTICS
    Number of Concentrators as of December

    Concentrators 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
    Earth and Planetary Sciences 24 27 17 17 16 12 18 18 21 20
    Earth and Planetary Sciences + another field 4 1 1  2 3 6 5 4 5 4
    Another field + Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 7 6 7 8 5 5 5 2 1

    East Asian Studies

    Professor Ryuichi Abe, Director of Undergraduate Studies

    The concentration in East Asian Studies seeks to develop a critical understanding of the human experience in East Asia. To study East Asia is to be exposed to a world with different forms of political activity and social relations, religious traditions of great depth and philosophical schools with enduring insights, and literatures of unusual range and power. It is also to study a world that since the 19th century has come to share in the dilemmas of modernity that we all confront. For some this inquiry provides a challenging and satisfying addition to a liberal arts education. For some it is an opportunity to restore connections to an ancestral past. For others it leads to graduate studies. And for many others it is the beginning of a professional career with an East Asian component. The program provides preparation for a variety of fields of work and advanced study after graduation. Study abroad is encouraged.

    A concentrator develops skills in a language, participates in the tutorial program, and selects from a rich offering of lecture courses and seminars. The program allows students to learn about East Asia as a whole and also to pursue specialized study of one or more East Asian societies: China, Japan, Korea, or Vietnam. While there are some commonalities among the many cultures and peoples of East Asia, there are also innumerable differences that mark each of these cultures and peoples as distinct in their own right. Thus a primary goal of the Concentration in East Asian Studies is to expose students to both the unity and the multiplicity of this vast and complex region.

    The concentration offers a broad range of possibilities for students interested in the social sciences or the humanities. EAS facilitates course work in social sciences, incorporating approaches to modern East Asia drawn from political science, sociology, anthropology, economics, and psychology. Students with an interest in the humanities can choose to study modern and pre-modern East Asia from the perspectives of history, literature, art history, cultural studies, religion, philosophy, and folklore. EAS faculty are drawn from the departments of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Anthropology, Economics, Government, History, History of Art and Architecture, Sociology; the schools of Business and Law; and the Kennedy School of Government. The sophomore tutorial introduces a variety of perspectives from the humanities and the social sciences, and offers concentrators a forum to interact with Harvard’s East Asia faculty. At the end of the sophomore year, students typically decide on a disciplinary or area focus or choose a comparative perspective (involving one or more than one area or discipline) in consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies and their assigned faculty advisor. Juniors take an EAS 98 offering or an approved course to serve as their junior tutorial, and may choose to spend the summer in East Asia doing research or internships. Honors candidates usually spend the senior year researching and writing the honors thesis.

    The East Asian Studies concentration welcomes joint concentrators. Primary concentrators in another field who are interested in language study take six courses of language, the sophomore tutorial, and two area courses. Those interested in area studies take the sophomore tutorial and five additional courses on East Asia. Please consult the East Asian Studies tutorial office for detailed requirements.

    REQUIREMENTS
    Basic Requirements: 12 courses (48 credits)

    1. Required courses:
      1. Language: At least four, and no more than six, courses in Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Mongolian, Tibetan, or Vietnamese; or an approved combination of courses involving two East Asian languages. The language requirement is met by attaining a level of competence equivalent to four courses of language study; thus it is possible for the requirement to be satisfied in part by work done or experience gained elsewhere than in formal course work at Harvard. However, students who are allowed to take fewer than four courses of language due to previous training or knowledge are required to substitute other courses. No more than six courses of language may be counted for concentration credit.
      2. Tutorials: Two courses of tutorial or courses designated as equivalents. See 2a and 2b for more information.
      3. Area Courses: Four to six non-language courses in East Asian or related subjects, selected from the list available in the undergraduate office. One of these courses must be one of the following survey courses: General Education 1136 Power and Civilization: China (formerly SW 12), History 1023 Japan in Asia and the World (formerly SW 13), or General Education 1100 The Two Koreas in the Modern World (formerly SW 27). It is recommended that at least two area courses be upper-level seminars. The number of courses required depends on the number of East Asian language courses that a student chooses. Together these must total ten, so a student who chooses to count six courses of language requires four additional area courses, and a student who chooses to count four language courses requires six area courses.
    2. Tutorials:
      1. East Asian Studies 97ab: Sophomore Tutorial (may be taken in sophomore or junior year).
      2. East Asian Studies 98: Junior Tutorial. With permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, an approved replacement course may be substituted for EAS 98.
    3. Thesis: None.
    4. General Examination: None.
    5. Other information: Courses counted for concentration credit may not be taken Pass/Fail, except by special petition. EAS 97ab may not be taken Pass/Fail. General Education classes on East Asia can be counted for concentration credit. Content courses taught in an East Asian language can count toward the language or area course requirement. A content course taught in an East Asian language may also count as a junior tutorial replacement course with the written permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies. One Humanities Frameworks 4 credit course may count towards EAS area credit.

    Requirements for Honors Eligibility: 13 courses (52 credits)

    1. Required courses:
      1. Language: Four courses in Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Mongolian, Tibetan, or Vietnamese, or an approved combination of courses involving two East Asian languages (see Basic Requirements, item 1a).
      2. Tutorials: Four courses of tutorial or courses designated as equivalents. See 2 for more information.
      3. Area Courses: Three to five courses selected from among East Asian or related subjects (see item 1c of Basic Requirements), including language courses beyond Basic Requirements. The number of courses required depends on the number of East Asian language courses that a student chooses. Together, these must total nine, so a student who chooses to count six courses of language requires three additional area courses, and a student who chooses to count four language courses requires five area courses.
    2. Tutorials: Same as Basic Requirements. Plus: Senior year: East Asian Studies 99 (two terms), preparation of thesis, required. Letter-graded. The senior tutorial consists of weekly meetings with the graduate student adviser and regular (usually bi-weekly) meetings with the faculty adviser. There are also periodic meetings with other seniors writing theses. EAS 99 counts towards course requirements.
    3. Thesis: Required of all honors candidates.
    4. General Examination: None.
    5. Other information: Courses counted for concentration credit may not be taken Pass/Fail, except by special petition. EAS 97ab may not be taken Pass/Fail. General Education classes on East Asia can be counted for concentration credit. Content courses taught in an East Asian language can count toward the language or area course requirement. A content course taught in an East Asian language may also count as a junior tutorial replacement course with the written permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies. One Humanities Frameworks 4 credit course may count towards EAS area credit.

    Concentration requirements for the Joint Concentration in East Asian History: 14 courses (56 credits)

    Students whose interest in East Asian civilization is primarily historical should consider concentrating in East Asian History. East Asian History is a joint concentration co-sponsored by the History Department and the East Asian Studies concentration. It aims to take advantage of the strengths of both concentrations. The goal of the program is to introduce students to the craft of historical study—the ways historians make sense of the past, and the skills of historical analysis, writing, and research—as well as to promote a critical understanding of the historical experience of East Asian societies. In addition to in-depth language study and substantial course work in the history of East Asia, students enrolling in this concentration will do one half of their tutorial work in the History Department and the other half in the East Asian Studies concentration. The sophomore tutorial in History introduces students to the analysis of historical writing in various genres, while the EAS sophomore tutorial introduces the history, literature and intellectual traditions of China, Japan, and Korea. By taking a History department research seminar or an EALC research seminar, students are introduced to methods of historical research and writing and have the opportunity to conduct in-depth research projects. In the senior year, joint concentrators will work with an appropriate faculty adviser and graduate student tutor to write a thesis, an original work in some aspect of East Asian history.

    1. East Asian Language Courses (4 courses): Four courses of study of an East Asian language.
    2. Additional Coursework (8 courses)
      1. History 97.
      2. East Asian Studies 97. Both 97 tutorials are offered in the spring term only; students may choose to take both during their sophomore spring, or to take one in the sophomore spring and the other in the junior spring.
      3. One seminar focused on East Asian History and culminating in a 20 page research paper involving primary search. Must be completed by the end of the junior spring, in preparation for the senior thesis.
      4. One course that focuses significantly on U.S. or European history.
      5. One course in pre-modern East Asian History.
      6. One course in modern East Asian History.
      7. Two additional electives within East Asian History.
    3. Senior Thesis (2 courses) Students who wish to pursue a joint concentration in East Asian History must write a Senior Thesis, which also requires enrollment in one of two year-long Senior Thesis Seminars: either History 99 or East Asian Studies 99. Students may select either seminar.

    Please also note the following information:

    Two types of courses count automatically toward East Asian History concentration requirements:

    1. Courses listed in courses.my.harvard.edu "History" course search (especially 1600-level courses) and "East Asian Languages and Civilization" section (especially under "East Asian Studies," as well as "Japanese History," "Chinese History," and "Korean History"), including cross-listed courses; and
    2. Courses taught in the General Education and/or Freshman Seminar programs by full members of the History faculty or historical courses taught by faculty in East Asian Languages and Civilizations. Students wishing to count such courses toward their concentration requirements should consult the Undergraduate Office, as they may need to file a petition requiring approval by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students may also apply to do an independent study, or History 91r, with a member of the Department; History 91r can be used to fulfill one of the elective course requirements.

    The joint concentration also regularly accepts credit from both Study Abroad and Advanced Standing toward concentration requirements. With the exception of certain Freshman Seminars taught by History or East Asian Studies faculty (see above), courses taken on Pass/Fail basis may not be counted for concentration credit.

    ADVISING

    All concentrators meet individually with the Director of Undergraduate Studies and the Assistant Director of Undergraduate Studies during the first week of each term. At other times, students are welcome to drop in during office hours as often as is desired or necessary. At the end of the sophomore year, students consult with the Director of Undergraduate Studies and the Assistant Director of Undergraduate Studies regarding their choice of disciplinary and area focus. Students are also encouraged to make appointments to meet with the Director of Undergraduate Studies, the Assistant Director of Undergraduate Studies, and faculty adviser or to come to their office hours.

    For up-to-date information on advising in East Asian Studies, please see the Advising Programs Office website.

    RESOURCES

    Students of East Asia at Harvard, in whatever program, benefit from a number of unusual resources. Among these are the magnificent collections of the Harvard-Yenching Library—the Chinese collection is perhaps the most comprehensive in the world, while those on Japan and Korea also are imposing. The Harvard-Yenching Institute, in addition to its support of the library, operates programs that bring younger East Asian scholars and graduate students to Harvard. The Fairbank Center for East Asian Research and the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies also have a number of scholars on East Asia in residence annually, and sponsor workshops and other enriching activities. Harvard, moreover, sponsors certain study programs abroad, and the existence of these and other opportunities has led to an increasing number of students spending one of their undergraduate years in East Asia.

    HOW TO FIND OUT MORE

    Freshmen or sophomores interested in concentrating on East Asia should contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Ryuichi Abe, or the Coordinator for EAS, Nicole Escolas. They can also stop by the EAS office at 9 Kirkland Place during office hours, come to the office hours of the Director of Undergraduate Studies and the Assistant Director of Undergraduate Studies, or make appointments with them. A copy of our brochure, East Asian Studies at Harvard University, A Guide for Undergraduates is available on the EAS website. More information can be obtained by emailing eas@fas.harvard.edu or calling 617-495-8365.

     

    ENROLLMENT STATISTICS
    Number of Concentrators as of December

    Concentrators 2008 2009 2010  2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
    East Asian Studies 40 32 31 41 46 39 28 22 22 18
    East Asian Studies + another field 1 0 2  2 3 3 7 5 3 1
    Another field + East Asian Studies 13 5 6  11 12 14 15 10 9 13








     

    Economics

    Professor Jeffrey Miron, Director of Undergraduate Studies

    Economics is a social science that is at once broad in its subject matter and unified in its approach to understanding the social world. An economic analysis begins from the premise that individuals have goals and that they pursue those goals as best they can. Economics studies the behavior of social systems—such as markets, corporations, legislatures, and families—as the outcome of interactions through institutions between goal-directed individuals. Ultimately, economists make policy recommendations that they believe will make people better off.

    Traditionally, economics has focused on understanding prices, competitive markets, and the interactions between markets. While topics such as monopolies and antitrust, income inequality, economic growth, and the business cycle continue to be important areas of inquiry, the subject matter of economics has broadened. Today, economists address a remarkable variety of social science questions. Will school vouchers improve the quality of education? Do politicians manipulate the business cycle? What sort of legal regime best promotes economic development? Why do cities have ghettos? What can be done about grade inflation? Why do people procrastinate in saving for retirement—or in doing their homework?

    Economics today is a scientific discipline. Bringing their particular perspective to the questions of social science, economists formulate theories and collect evidence to test these theories against alternative ideas. Doing economic research involves asking questions about the social world and addressing those questions with data and clear-headed logic, employing mathematical and statistical tools whenever possible to aid the analysis.

    An undergraduate education in economics focuses on learning to analyze the world in terms of tradeoffs and incentives—that is, to think like an economist. Students concentrating in economics begin, ordinarily, in their first year, with Economics 10a and 10b, the introductory courses in economics. Because marginal conditions hold a central place among economists' analytical tools, prospective economics concentrators are required to complete math at the level of Math 1a. Students who have already met this requirement may choose to continue their study of mathematics in order to prepare for courses that assume familiarity with more advanced topics in mathematics or for graduate study in economics. Students hoping to graduate with honors must complete additional math courses; see the specific requirements below. First-year students are also encouraged to take the required introductory statistics course. The ability to interpret quantitative data and to understand statistical arguments is essential to understanding the economy. Students who have not completed this requirement their freshman year are advised to fulfill it their sophomore year.

    Concentrators ordinarily take four or five economics courses in their sophomore year. Two courses make up the intermediate theory sequence: one of 1010a or 1011a (Intermediate Microeconomics) and one of 1010b or 1011b (Intermediate Macroeconomics). These courses teach the analytical tools that economists use. The 1011 courses assume a more advanced background in mathematics than the 1010 courses. The third course generally taken in the sophomore year is Economics 970, the Sophomore Tutorial, which is taught in classes of eight to 10 students. The Sophomore Tutorial is an intensive experience aimed at helping concentrators understand the nature of economics research, discuss economic arguments both orally and in writing, and start to carry out their own research. Finally, students are advised to fulfill the econometrics requirement (Economics 1123 or 1126) in the sophomore year. This helps students get the most out of their Sophomore Tutorials as they use the tools learned in econometrics.

    Beyond these foundational courses, all concentrators are required to take three additional elective courses in the Economics Department. Students can pursue Honors either by writing a senior thesis or taking the non-thesis Advanced Course Track (ACT); see the specific requirements below. Honors candidates must also take the economics honors exam in the spring of their senior year.

    In recent years, approximately 25 percent of economics concentrators have chosen to write a senior thesis. Senior thesis topics often spring from a question of interest first raised in an economics elective course. Students are therefore strongly advised to take courses before their senior year in areas in which they might want to write their theses.

    Undergraduates are welcome in graduate courses and often do well in them. Because coverage of the professional literature is a primary objective of such courses, they are generally demanding and time-consuming for undergraduates.

    A more complete description of the Economics Department and its requirements can be found in the handbook, Undergraduate Economics at Harvard: A Guide for Concentrators, available on the Economics Undergraduate Program website.

     

    REQUIREMENTS
    Basic Requirements: 11 courses (44 credits)

    1. Required courses:
      1. Economics 10a and 10b (Principles of Economics). Students may use Economics AP scores of 5, or A levels or IB scores of 7, to place out of either/both parts of Ec 10. However, they must replace each semester of Ec 10 that is skipped with one elective course in economics. Consult the economics concentrator guide or a concentration adviser for details.
      2. Math 1a (or, placement into Math 1b or higher, or an AP Calculus AB or BC score of 5). Students who place out of this course do not need to replace it with an additional course.
      3. Economics 970: Sophomore Tutorial.
      4. Statistics 100, 104, 109, or 110; or Applied Math 101; or Math 154. Note: the first statistics class on your transcript will be the one counted for the economics concentration.
      5. Economics 1010a or 1011a (Intermediate Microeconomics).
      6. Economics 1010b or 1011b (Intermediate Macroeconomics).
      7. Economics 1123 or 1126 (Econometrics).
      8. Three additional courses in economics that include:
        1. one course that satisfies the writing requirement (see item 5a).
        2. one course that has Economics 1010a, 1010b, 1011a, or 1011b as a prerequisite.
          Note: Some courses can be used to satisfy both the “writing” and “prerequisite” requirements simultaneously. However, a total of three economics courses must still be taken.
    2. Tutorials (letter-graded):
      1. Sophomore Tutorial: Economics 970 is required, as mentioned in item 1c.
    3. Thesis: None required for the basic track.
    4. General Examination: None required for the Basic Track.
    5. Other information:
      1. Writing Requirement: A list of courses that satisfy the writing requirement is available from the Undergraduate Office and online.
      2. Pass/Fail: Concentrators may take up to two courses Pass/Fail, except for (i) those courses used to fulfill items 1a–g of the required courses, (ii) tutorials, and (iii) courses used to meet the writing requirement in item 1h.
      3. Joint Concentrations: The Economics Department does not participate in joint concentrations.
      4. Theory Requirement: Starting Fall 2014, concentrators must demonstrate their command of the basic tools of economic analysis by receiving a grade of B- or higher in both Economics 1010a/1011a and Economics 1010b/1011b. (Please see a concentration advisor for questions on Economics 1010/1011ab taken prior to Fall 2014.) Students who receive below a B- in 1010a/1011a must either register for 975a or take an extra economics elective with 1010a/1011a as a prerequisite. Those who receive below a B- in 1010b/1011b must register for 975b or take an extra economics elective with 1010b/1011b as a prerequisite. The Economics 975ab courses involve retaking the corresponding intermediate theory course. In all cases, students must receive a grade of B- or higher in the make-up course. Concentrators will not receive a degree in economics until this requirement is met. Economics 975ab does not satisfy any economics electives required in item 1h; however, it will it be factored into the economics GPA of students pursuing honors.

    Concentrators may take either one approved Harvard Summer School class listed on the Economics Summer School webpage or one approved study abroad course to meet a course requirement for the concentration. Courses from study abroad are approved at the department's discretion as outlined on the Economics Study Abroad webpage. Requirements for Honors Eligibility: 15 courses (60 credits)

    1. Required courses: Same as Basic Requirements, plus:
      1. Math 1b and one of Math 18, Math 21a, or Applied Math 21a. Students who choose to skip Math 1b do not need to replace it with an additional course.
      2. For Thesis Track honors: Economics 985 (two terms) or 990 (two terms) and completion of a thesis.
      3. For Advanced Course Track (ACT) honors: Two additional economics elective courses, which must include an additional “writing” and requirement and an additional “theory prerequisite.” Details in item 5a of this section.
    2. Tutorials (All letter-graded): Same as Basic Requirements, plus:
      1. Thesis Tutorial: As discussed in 1b, Thesis Track honors candidates must enroll in Economics 985 (two terms) or Economics 990 (two terms) during their final two terms. Economics 990 is generally for off-cycle students who are graduating in the fall term.
    3. Thesis: Required for a recommendation for High or Highest Honors in Field. See item 5a of this section.
    4. General Examination: In the spring term of their senior year, all honors candidates must take a general examination covering microeconomics, macroeconomics, and econometrics.
    5. Other information: Same as Basic Requirements, plus:
      1. In order to be considered for an honors recommendation in Economics, a student has two options:
        1. Thesis Track: To be considered for a High or Highest Honors recommendation in Economics, a student must complete a thesis, in addition to the requirements specified above.
        2. Advanced Course Track: To be considered for an Honors recommendation in Economics, a student can pursue the ACT, which is the non-thesis honors option. The requirements are discussed above. As stated in item 1c, two additional courses in economics are required (beyond the three courses and requirements in item 1h in Basic Requirements). Within this total of five courses, the student must have at least two courses that have Economics 1010a, 1010b, 1011a, or 1011b as a prerequisite and at least two courses that satisfies the writing requirement.
      2. A document explaining the Economics Department honors calculations is available on the Department Honors webpage.

    ADVISING

    Students interested in economics are encouraged to visit the Economics Undergraduate Advising Office, located on the first floor of Littauer Center, for information and advice about economics courses and the economics concentration. The office is headed by Jeffrey Miron—the Director of Undergraduate Studies—five PhD economists who serve as concentration advisors, and the Undergraduate Program Coordinator. Concentration advisors are available in the Economics Undergraduate Advising Office (Littauer 109-116) on a walk-in basis, from 10am to 4pm, Monday through Friday, during the semester; they are happy to respond to any student questions or concerns. Concentration advisors can lift advising holds, approve concentration declaration forms, sign add/drop forms, and advise/approve courses for concentrators from study abroad. More importantly, they can explain Department requirements, discuss students’ academic and research interests, offer advice on course choices, and discuss future plans, such as job possibilities or graduate or professional school.

    Each concentrator has an assigned advisor based on their residential House. Students will hear from their concentration advisor periodically, to inform them of office hours, important deadlines, meetings, and requirements. Students may, at any time, contact their concentration advisor for help or for information. Students are also welcomed to seek advice from any of the advisors during walk-in advising office hours.

    For up-to-date information on economics advising, please see the Economics Advising Webpage.

    STUDY ABROAD

    The Economics Department supports study abroad for a term or an academic year. It is generally best for students to study abroad during their junior year. Students may earn concentration credit for one course taken while abroad. Students may postpone Economics 970 (Sophomore Tutorial) if they choose to go abroad during their sophomore year.

    After choosing a university and obtaining College approval for planned courses from the Office of International Education, students should visit their concentration advisor during office hours and, if possible, bring course syllabi to the meeting to have the required pre-departure questionnaire approved and signed. The advisor will grant credit toward fulfilling economics concentration requirements for appropriate courses (although some students choose not to fulfill economics concentration requirements while abroad). To count for concentration credit, a course must be primarily economic in content and methodology and roughly equivalent in difficulty to a Harvard Economics Department course. Courses with an intermediate theory prerequisite may count toward the theory prerequisite requirement. Students who write a paper longer than 15 pages for a course can submit the graded paper to their concentration adviser, who may grant writing requirement credit for the course if the paper has substantial economic content.

    HOW TO FIND OUT MORE

    There is an abundance of information on the Department website. To declare an economics concentration, students must (1) submit their declaration on my.harvard.edu and then (2) bring a completed copy of the Economics Declaration and Plan of Study form to a concentration advisor for approval. A more complete description of the Economics Department and its requirements can be found in the handbook, Undergraduate Economics at Harvard: A Guide for Concent